Special Issue "Soil Phosphorus Dynamics: Agronomic and Environmental Impacts"

A special issue of Agronomy (ISSN 2073-4395). This special issue belongs to the section "Soil and Plant Nutrition".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 February 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Karen Daly
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Crops, Environment & Land Use, The Agriculture and Food Development Authority, TEAGASC, Johnstown Castle, Wexford, Ireland
Interests: soil phosphorus chemistry; biological cycling; water quality; sediment phosphorus dynamics; catchment scale processes

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Phosphorus is an essential element to all known life and an adequate supply is required in agricultural soils to meet the demands for crop growth and grazing animal health. Its use as a fertiliser in agricultural systems across the world has increased crop yields and quality and facilitated intensification. However, as the price of fertilisers continues to rise, farmers are faced with the challenges of managing this resource and promoting nutrient efficiency in their soils.

The agri-environmental landscape has also changed, especially, since the implementation of water quality directives in Europe and on increased consumer demand for sustainably produced food from agriculture. The growing need for economic and environmental sustainability has stimulated interest in efficient P fertiliser utilization and nutrient management on farms that promotes a more targeted and soil specific approach to increase the P supplying capacities of soils under lower P input regimes, and protect against environmental losses.

This Special Issue will focus on “Soil Phosphorus Dynamics: Agronomic and Environmental Impacts”. We welcome novel research, reviews and opinion pieces covering all related topics including soil chemistry, phosphorus cycling, chemical and biologically mediated processes, agronomic P use efficiency, crop uptake, catchment hydrology, alternative fertilisers and products, phosphorus mitigation measures for water quality, soil and catchment scale modelling, in-stream processes, case-studies from the field, and policy positions.

Dr. Karen Daly
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Agronomy is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Soil phosphorus cycling
  • Water quality protection
  • Phosphorus use efficiency
  • Sediment phosphorus
  • Field and catchment scale losses

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Screening Tolerance to Phosphorus Deficiency and Validation of Phosphorus Uptake 1 (Pup1) Gene-Linked Markers in Thai Indigenous Upland Rice Germplasm
Agronomy 2019, 9(2), 81; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy9020081 - 12 Feb 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Phosphorus (P) deficiency is a major factor limiting rice yield throughout the world. Fortunately, some rice accessions are tolerant and can thrive well, even in soils with low P content. The ability to uptake P is heritable, and thus can be incorporated into [...] Read more.
Phosphorus (P) deficiency is a major factor limiting rice yield throughout the world. Fortunately, some rice accessions are tolerant and can thrive well, even in soils with low P content. The ability to uptake P is heritable, and thus can be incorporated into rice cultivars through standard breeding methods. The objective of this study was to screen for tolerance to phosphorus deficiency and validate the tolerant accessions with phosphorus uptake 1 (Pup1) gene-linked markers in Thai indigenous upland rice germplasm. One hundred sixty-eight rice varieties were screened in a solution culture and assigned a phosphorus deficiency tolerance index and plant symptom score. Eleven upland rice accessions (ULR026, ULR031, ULR124, ULR145, ULR180, ULR183, ULR185, ULR186, ULR213, ULR260, and ULR305), together with the lowland rice cultivar (PLD), were classified as tolerant. They were each validated by nine markers linked to the Pup1 locus and observed for the expected polymerase chain reaction (PCR) product of 0 to 9 markers. The presence or absence of the tolerant allele at the Pup1 locus showed only a slight relationship with the tolerance. Moreover, some lines such as ULR183 and ULR213 expressed high tolerance without the Pup1-linked gene product. Both accessions are useful for the exploration of novel genes conferring tolerance to phosphorus deficiency. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Soil Phosphorus Dynamics: Agronomic and Environmental Impacts)
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Open AccessArticle
Effects of White Lupin and Groundnut on Fractionated Rhizosphere Soil P of Different P-Limited Soil Types in Japan
Agronomy 2019, 9(2), 68; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy9020068 - 02 Feb 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Phosphorus (P) is an essential nutrient for crop production, while most soil P is the less labile P associated with Aluminum (Al) and Iron (Fe) in acidic soils of Japan. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effects of two contrasting [...] Read more.
Phosphorus (P) is an essential nutrient for crop production, while most soil P is the less labile P associated with Aluminum (Al) and Iron (Fe) in acidic soils of Japan. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effects of two contrasting P-efficient legumes (white lupin, WL (Lupinus albus L.); and groundnut, GN (Arachis hypogaea L.)) on rhizosphere soil P dynamics in different soil types of Japan, such as Al-rich volcanic-soil, Fe-rich red-yellow-soil, and sandy-soil, with or without historical fertilization managements (3 soil types × 2 managements = 6 soil samples). We conducted a 56-day pot experiment, and analyzed the plant P uptake and fractionated P of rhizosphere and bulk soils, based on the Hedley-fractionation method. We observed that GN P uptake was generally larger than that in WL in most soil types and managements. WL significantly decreased the labile P in most soils and also decreased the less labile inorganic P (Pi) and organic P (Po) in fertilized Red-yellow-soil, which has much crystalline Fe, though GN did not. In contrast, both WL and GN significantly decreased the less labile Pi in fertilized volcanic-soil, which has much non-crystalline Al. These results indicate that (1) characteristics of less labile P uptake by P efficient legumes were different between the soil types and managements, and (2) WL efficiently solubilized the less labile P than GN in fertilized red-yellow soil, while GN efficiently absorbed the larger amount of P than WL, especially in volcanic- and sandy-soil. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Soil Phosphorus Dynamics: Agronomic and Environmental Impacts)
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Open AccessArticle
Phosphate Sources and Their Placement Affecting Soil Phosphorus Pools in Sugarcane
Agronomy 2018, 8(12), 283; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy8120283 - 27 Nov 2018
Cited by 2
Abstract
Phosphate fertilizer placement at sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) establishment can strongly influence the distribution of soil P pools over crop cycles, and has a great influence in the availability of this nutrient to plant uptake. Our main objective was to evaluate sugarcane yield [...] Read more.
Phosphate fertilizer placement at sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) establishment can strongly influence the distribution of soil P pools over crop cycles, and has a great influence in the availability of this nutrient to plant uptake. Our main objective was to evaluate sugarcane yield as well as changes in the distribution of soil P pools, under phosphate fertilizer sources and their management, over two years of sugarcane cultivation. The experiment was established in August 2013 with two phosphate sources (TSP (triple superphosphate) and RP (Bayovar rock phosphate)) and three application methods: as broadcast, at planting furrow and combining half broadcast/half plant furrow, all at the rate of 180 kg ha−1 soluble P2O5 being applied at crop establishment. Sugarcane yield and P uptake was evaluated, and soil was sampled after harvest in August 2015 to analyze P fractions. Substantial amounts of P derived from fertilizers were accumulated as inorganic and/or organic moderately labile P. Broadcast application of TSP was not able to enhance total P in 0–40 cm layer compared to control treatment. In general, TSP was more effective to supply P for sugarcane and keep more of this nutrient in all labile fractions in the soil. However, the potential residual effect of RP (Ca-P) is expected in the following years, slowly solubilizing over the time. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Soil Phosphorus Dynamics: Agronomic and Environmental Impacts)
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Review

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Open AccessFeature PaperReview
Harnessing Soil Microbes to Improve Plant Phosphate Efficiency in Cropping Systems
Agronomy 2019, 9(3), 127; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy9030127 - 08 Mar 2019
Cited by 5
Abstract
Phosphorus is an essential macronutrient required for plant growth and development. It is central to many biological processes, including nucleic acid synthesis, respiration, and enzymatic activity. However, the strong adsorption of phosphorus by minerals in the soil decreases its availability to plants, thus [...] Read more.
Phosphorus is an essential macronutrient required for plant growth and development. It is central to many biological processes, including nucleic acid synthesis, respiration, and enzymatic activity. However, the strong adsorption of phosphorus by minerals in the soil decreases its availability to plants, thus reducing the productivity of agricultural and forestry ecosystems. This has resulted in a complete dependence on non-renewable chemical fertilizers that are environmentally damaging. Alternative strategies must be identified and implemented to help crops acquire phosphorus more sustainably. In this review, we highlight recent advances in our understanding and utilization of soil microbes to both solubilize inorganic phosphate from insoluble forms and allocate it directly to crop plants. Specifically, we focus on arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, ectomycorrhizal fungi, and phosphate-solubilizing bacteria. Each of these play a major role in natural and agroecosystems, and their use as bioinoculants is an increasing trend in agricultural practices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Soil Phosphorus Dynamics: Agronomic and Environmental Impacts)
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