Special Issue "Rhizobial Symbiosis in Crop Legumes: Molecular and Cellular Aspects"

A special issue of Agronomy (ISSN 2073-4395). This special issue belongs to the section "Crop Breeding and Genetics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 November 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Anna Tsyganova
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biotechnology, All-Russia Research Institute for Agricultural Microbiology Podbelsky chaussee 3, St. Petersburg, Pushkin 8, 196608, Russia
Interests: cell biology of plant–microbe interactions; legume–rhizobial symbiosis; plant–microbe interface
Dr. Viktor E. Tsyganov
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Department of Biotechnology, All-Russia Research Institute for Agricultural Microbiology Podbelsky chaussee 3, St. Petersburg, Pushkin 8, 196608, Russia
Interests: genetics and cell biology of plant–microbe interactions; legume–rhizobial symbiosis; legume–mycorrhizal symbiosis
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent years, sustainable agriculture has been actively developing all over the world, aimed at the production of high-grade, ecologically friendly, and health-improving agricultural products. The widespread use of legumes in sustainable agriculture will increase biological nitrogen fixation, reduce energy costs, improve the physical properties of soil, and increase its biodiversity. In addition, legumes are important food and forage crops, being the main crops in some regions. In recent years, significant progress has been achieved in deciphering the molecular and cellular mechanisms of the development of symbiotic nodules.

We invite you to please share your findings on the molecular and cellular mechanisms of symbiotic nitrogen fixation in crops in this Special Issue. Submissions on the following topics (but not limited to) are invited: (1) omics sciences in the crop symbiotic nitrogen fixation, (2) interactions of macro- and micro-symbionts during the development of the plant–microbe interface, (3) signal transduction during the formation and development of a symbiotic nodule, (4) plant cell reorganization during rhizobia accommodation, and (5) the participation of phytohormones and reactive oxygen species in the formation and development of a symbiotic nodule. Original research papers, methods, reviews, and short communications are also welcome.

Dr. Anna Tsyganova
Dr. Viktor E. Tsyganov
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Agronomy is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Crop legume
  • Symbiotic nodule
  • Plant-microbe interface
  • Infection thread
  • Symbiosome
  • Nod factors and receptors
  • Signal transduction
  • Symbiotic genes
  • Transcriptomics
  • Proteomics
  • Metabolomics
  • Phytohormones
  • Reactive oxygen species
  • Symbiotic effectiveness

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Increasing the Legume–Rhizobia Symbiotic Efficiency Due to the Synergy between Commercial Strains and Strains Isolated from Relict Symbiotic Systems
Agronomy 2021, 11(7), 1398; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy11071398 - 12 Jul 2021
Viewed by 297
Abstract
The phenomenon of rhizobial synergy was investigated to increase the efficiency of nitrogen-fixing symbiosis of alfalfa (Medicago varia Martyn), common vetch (Vicia sativa L.) or red clover (Trifolium pratense L.). These plants were co-inoculated with the respective commercial strains Sinorhizobium [...] Read more.
The phenomenon of rhizobial synergy was investigated to increase the efficiency of nitrogen-fixing symbiosis of alfalfa (Medicago varia Martyn), common vetch (Vicia sativa L.) or red clover (Trifolium pratense L.). These plants were co-inoculated with the respective commercial strains Sinorhizobium meliloti RCAM1750, Rhizobium leguminosarum RCAM0626 or R. leguminosarum RCAM1365 and with the strains Mesorhizobium japonicum Opo-235, M. japonicum Opo-242, Bradyrhizobium sp. Opo-243 or M. kowhaii Ach-343 isolated from the relict legumes Oxytropis popoviana Peschkova and Astragalus chorinensis Bunge. The isolates mentioned above had additional symbiotic genes (fix, nif, nodnoe and nol) as well as the genes promoting plant growth and symbiosis formation (acdRS, genes associated with the biosynthesis of gibberellins and auxins, genes of T3SS, T4SS and T6SS secretion systems) compared to the commercial strains. Nodulation assays showed that in some variants of co-inoculation the symbiotic parameters of plants such as nodule number, plant biomass or acetylene reduction activity were increased. We assume that the study of microbial synergy using rhizobia of relict legumes will make it possible to carry out targeted selection of co-microsymbionts to increase the efficiency of agricultural legume–rhizobia systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Rhizobial Symbiosis in Crop Legumes: Molecular and Cellular Aspects)
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