Special Issue "Quantitative Trait Locus Mapping for Crop Plants"

A special issue of Agronomy (ISSN 2073-4395).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Arron H. Carter

Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, Washington State University, Pullman, WA, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Plant breeding, genomics-assisted selection, high-throughput phenotyping, abiotic and biotic stress resistance, end-use quality

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Recent advances in crop phenotyping and genotyping has brought about new abilities to effectively identify QTL in genomic regions associated with important plant traits. The increasing number of molecular markers available for a broadening range of crops and the ease and lowering cost of genotyping has allowed many plant breeders to re-evaluate how they use markers for both research and selection. Couple this with emerging technologies which enhance the ability to phenotype for complex traits, and our ability to identify QTL associated with important traits has significantly increased.

We have found that identification of QTL is not the end-point, but that validation of these QTL in diverse genetic backgrounds plays an essential role in understanding their usefulness in plant breeding. Identification and validation of QTL for important traits across crop plants allows useful and efficient ways to do marker-assisted selection and to combine this with genomic selection methods. As we continue to identify and validate QTL, and as genomic technologies and methods continue to progress, plant breeders will have the tools necessary to select for traits important to their respective crops.

This Special Issue will focus on “Quantitative Trait Locus Mapping for Crop Plants”. We welcome novel research and reviews which provide information on novel QTL, new markers associated with useful QTL, and QTL validation, on a variety of traits and crops, which will provide the molecular marker tools necessary for plant breeders to employ genomic informed selection of new varieties.

Dr. Arron H. Carter
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Agronomy is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Crop genetics
  • Plant breeding
  • Genome-wide association analysis
  • QTL analysis
  • QTL validation
  • Marker-assisted selection
  • Abiotic stress resistance
  • Biotic stress resistance
  • Agronomics and end-use quality

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Mapping Quantitative Trait Loci for Agronomic Traits in Winter Wheat under Different Soil Moisture Levels
Agronomy 2018, 8(8), 133; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy8080133
Received: 1 July 2018 / Revised: 23 July 2018 / Accepted: 29 July 2018 / Published: 31 July 2018
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Abstract
Due to variable moisture conditions in the U.S. Great Plains, it is important to understand genetic control of crop traits under a range of soil moisture levels. Our objective was to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) for yield, phenology, and morphological traits in
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Due to variable moisture conditions in the U.S. Great Plains, it is important to understand genetic control of crop traits under a range of soil moisture levels. Our objective was to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) for yield, phenology, and morphological traits in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) under different soil moisture conditions. Field evaluation of a winter wheat doubled haploid population (n = 185) derived from a cross between CO940610 and ‘Platte’ was carried out in Fort Collins and Greeley, Colorado, USA in 2007–2008 and 2008–2009, respectively. At each location, trials were grown under moderate drought stress and fully irrigated conditions. A total of 33 QTL for 11 traits was detected in two or more environments. A cluster of QTL for nine traits was found on chromosome 2B in the vicinity of the photoperiod response gene Ppd-B1. Other stable QTL clusters were detected on chromosome 6A and near the vernalization response gene Vrn-D3 on chromosome 7D. A QTL for grain yield on chromosome 5A was detected in three environments. With minor exceptions, the large-effect QTL were detected in both the water limited and fully irrigated environments, rather than being detected only under specific moisture levels. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Quantitative Trait Locus Mapping for Crop Plants)
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Open AccessArticle Genetic Diversity of Clinal Freezing Tolerance Variation in Winter Wheat Landraces
Received: 6 May 2018 / Revised: 9 June 2018 / Accepted: 12 June 2018 / Published: 14 June 2018
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Abstract
Wheat (Triticumaestivum L.) is a major cereal crop grown across a wide range of environments, but its productivity around the world is challenged by various biotic and abiotic factors. Wheat landraces from around the world are a source of unexploited genetic
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Wheat (Triticumaestivum L.) is a major cereal crop grown across a wide range of environments, but its productivity around the world is challenged by various biotic and abiotic factors. Wheat landraces from around the world are a source of unexploited genetic diversity that can be essential for modern wheat-breeding programs in search of resistance to abiotic stresses like freezing tolerance. This genetic diversity study of 553 winter wheat landraces based on single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) revealed separate clusters of landraces related to the latitude of origin. Linkage block analysis revealed genomic regions with specific alleles skewed towards landraces from higher latitudes, suggesting that migration to higher latitudes resulted in the fixing of specific alleles. Electrolyte leakage was used to measure the tolerance of freezing to −14 °C, −16 °C, and −18 °C of 192 landraces. There was a significant negative correlation between latitude and electrolyte leakage, with an R2 value of 0.14, (p < 0.0001), in a regression analysis indicating greater freezing tolerance in landraces from higher latitudes. Genome-wide association studies identified regions in chromosomes 4A and 6A associated with higher latitudes and freezing tolerance, respectively. Landraces with freezing tolerance may be useful in developing new germplasm as novel sources of greater cold hardiness. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Quantitative Trait Locus Mapping for Crop Plants)
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Open AccessArticle Genome-Wide Linkage Mapping of Quantitative Trait Loci for Late-Season Physiological and Agronomic Traits in Spring Wheat under Irrigated Conditions
Received: 28 March 2018 / Revised: 17 April 2018 / Accepted: 21 April 2018 / Published: 25 April 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (5328 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Many late-season physiological traits affect grain yield in wheat, either directly or indirectly. However, information on the genetic control of yield-related traits is still limited. In this study, we aimed to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) for canopy temperature and chlorophyll content index
[...] Read more.
Many late-season physiological traits affect grain yield in wheat, either directly or indirectly. However, information on the genetic control of yield-related traits is still limited. In this study, we aimed to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) for canopy temperature and chlorophyll content index during anthesis (CTa and CCIa, respectively), the mid grain-filling stage (CTg1 and CCIg1, respectively), and the late grain-filling stage (CTg2 and CCIg2, respectively) as well as for plant height (PH), thousand kernels weight (TKW), and grain yield (GY) using genome-wide linkage mapping. To this end, a double haploid population derived from a cross between two high yielding wheat cultivars, UI Platinum and SY Capstone, was phenotyped in four irrigated environments and genotyped using the wheat 90K iSelect platform and simple sequence repeats. The genotypic data were used to construct a high-density genetic map of 43 linkage groups (LGs) with a total length of 3594.0 cm and a marker density of 0.37 cm. A total of 116 QTL for all nine traits was detected on 33 LGs, spreading to all wheat chromosomes, except for Chr. 7D. Of these, six QTL (CTa.ui-4B.1, Q.CTg1.ui-5B-2.1, Q.CTg2.ui-6B.1, Q.PH.ui-6A-2.1, Q.TKW.ui-2D-1, and Q.GY.ui-6B) were consistently detected in more than three irrigated environments, called as stable QTL. Additionally, we identified 26 QTL clusters for more than two traits, of which the top four were located on Chromosomes 4A-1, 1B-1, 5B-2, and 2D-1. Overall, the stable QTL significantly related with grain yield, QTL clusters, and linked molecular markers identified in this study, may be useful in marker-assisted selection in early generation and early growth stage for grain yield improvement. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Quantitative Trait Locus Mapping for Crop Plants)
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