Special Issue "Effects of Crop Disease and Pesticide on Crop Production"

A special issue of Agronomy (ISSN 2073-4395). This special issue belongs to the section "Innovative Cropping Systems".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2019.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Spyridon D. Koutroubas
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Agricultural Development, Democritus University of Thrace, Orestiada, Greece
Interests: Agronomy, Crop Science, Crop Physiology, Plant Nutrition
Dr. Christos A. Damalas
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Agricultural Development, Democritus University of Thrace, GR-68200 Orestiada, Greece
Interests: production agriculture; crop physiology; weed biology; pesticide use and safety issues; risk assessment; farmers’ behavior
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Crop diseases can cause significant losses to farmers and threaten food security. The spread of crop diseases has increased dramatically in recent years, with agricultural intensification, globalization, trade, and climate change playing a role. Climate change will probably influence the occurrence, prevalence and severity of plant diseases. This will also affect disease management with regard to timing, preference and efficacy of chemical, physical and biological measures of control. Therefore, assessment of crop yield losses is needed for the improvement of production systems that contribute to the incomes of rural families and food security worldwide. Chemical control has been critical in preventing losses due to crop diseases, especially with the development of numerous specific-action fungicides. However, intensive use of chemical control measures has in turn led to its own challenges, including resistance to pesticides. Therefore, improved knowledge, risk assessment, and monitoring will be vital to improve management decisions and safeguard both existing and future chemistry. For this Special Issue on “Effects of Crop Disease and Pesticide on Crop Production”, we are ready to accept papers that enhance our understanding of the role of crop diseases in current or alternative production systems and discuss opportunities for new solutions and desicion support systems for the management of crop diseases with chemical and non-chemical methods.

Prof. Dr. Spyridon D. Koutroubas
Dr. Christos A. Damalas
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Agronomy is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Agronomic practices
  • Crop productivity
  • Desicion support
  • New crop diseases
  • Food security
  • Risk assessment
  • Yield losses

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

Open AccessReview
Rice Blast: A Disease with Implications for Global Food Security
Agronomy 2019, 9(8), 451; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy9080451 - 15 Aug 2019
Abstract
Rice blast is a serious fungal disease of rice (Oryza sativa L.) that is threatening global food security. It has been extensively studied due to the importance of rice production and consumption, and because of its vast distribution and destructiveness across the [...] Read more.
Rice blast is a serious fungal disease of rice (Oryza sativa L.) that is threatening global food security. It has been extensively studied due to the importance of rice production and consumption, and because of its vast distribution and destructiveness across the world. Rice blast, caused by Pyricularia oryzae Cavara 1892 (A), can infect aboveground tissues of rice plants at any growth stage and cause total crop failure. The pathogen produces lesions on leaves (leaf blast), leaf collars (collar blast), culms, culm nodes, panicle neck nodes (neck rot), and panicles (panicle blast), which vary in color and shape depending on varietal resistance, environmental conditions, and age. Understanding how rice blast is affected by environmental conditions at the cellular and genetic level will provide critical insight into incidence of the disease in future climates for effective decision-making and management. Integrative strategies are required for successful control of rice blast, including chemical use, biocontrol, selection of advanced breeding lines and cultivars with resistance genes, investigating genetic diversity and virulence of the pathogen, forecasting and mapping distribution of the disease and pathogen races, and examining the role of wild rice and weeds in rice blast epidemics. These tactics should be integrated with agronomic practices including the removal of crop residues to decrease pathogen survival, crop and land rotations, avoiding broadcast planting and double cropping, water management, and removal of yield-limiting factors for rice production. Such an approach, where chemical use is based on crop injury and estimated yield and economic losses, is fundamental for the sustainable control of rice blast to improve rice production for global food security. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effects of Crop Disease and Pesticide on Crop Production)
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