Applications of Pre- and Post-harvest Techniques in Horticultural Products

A special issue of Agronomy (ISSN 2073-4395). This special issue belongs to the section "Horticultural and Floricultural Crops".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 November 2024 | Viewed by 3624

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
College of Horticulture, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, China
Interests: postharvest biology and technology; germplasm resources; fruit development and quality formation
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Horticultural products include fruits, vegetables, flowers, and tea, which are indispensable elements for people's daily food security, dietary structure improvement, micronutrient supplementation, and life beautification. However, most of the horticultural products are fresh agricultural products with a high physiological metabolism and high water content, which are not ideal for storage and transportation after harvesting, and post-harvest aging and pathogen infection seriously affect the flavor and nutritional quality. Pre-harvest and post-harvest treatments, especially technological innovations, play an important role in guiding the preservation and storage of horticultural products. Post-harvest pre-cooling, refrigerated storage, post-harvest heat treatment, improved atmospheric packaging, the application of exogenous chemicals, and other physical or chemical methods are common practices to minimize post-harvest losses of horticultural products.

This Special Issue, entitled “Applications of Pre- and Post-harvest Techniques in Horticultural Products”, will focus on new developments in our understanding of horticultural product storage technology, pre-harvest factors and storage effects, post-harvest physiology, and commercialization treatment technology.

We invite researchers to contribute both original research articles and reviews to this Special Issue.

Dr. Mengyao Li
Prof. Dr. Ya Luo
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • horticultural products
  • pre-harvest and post-harvest techniques
  • biological characteristics
  • nutritional quality

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

22 pages, 10705 KiB  
Article
Effects of Pre-Harvest Spraying with Salicylic Acid (SA) and Sodium Nitroprusside (SNP) on Storage Quality and Pathogenic Fungal Species in ‘Manaohong’ Cherries
by Ni Zhang, Ning Ji, Renchan Liu, Rui Wang, Cunkun Chen, Chao Ma, Huali Nie, Jiqing Lei and Qiuyun Tao
Agronomy 2023, 13(12), 2853; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy13122853 - 21 Nov 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1101
Abstract
Chinese cherries, with their delightful blend of sourness and sweetness, are highly favored for their taste and nutritional benefits. However, they mature in conditions of high temperatures and rainfall, making them vulnerable to fungal infections which compromise their post-harvest quality. Our research aimed [...] Read more.
Chinese cherries, with their delightful blend of sourness and sweetness, are highly favored for their taste and nutritional benefits. However, they mature in conditions of high temperatures and rainfall, making them vulnerable to fungal infections which compromise their post-harvest quality. Our research aimed to study the effects of pre-harvest spraying with salicylic acid (SA) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) on the pathogenic fungi in Manaohong cherries and their subsequent storage quality. We discovered that using SA and SNP at varying fruit development stages preserved fruit hardness, texture, appearance, and respiratory rate during storage, although it did not significantly alter the fruit’s dimensions. Furthermore, this pre-harvest treatment preserved levels of titratable acids, total phenols, and other antioxidants in the cherries, bolstered the activities of certain antioxidant enzymes (SOD, APX), and inhibited the activity of PPO and POD enzymes.Notably, the SA treatment alone demonstrated superior storage performance compared to combined treatments. Our research also identified Alternaria alternata and Colletotrichum godetiae as the primary pathogens in Manaohong cherries. In in vitro experiments, neither SA nor SNP inhibited these fungi’s growth. Consequently, we evaluated 12 pesticides and determined that 5% hexaconazole and 50% benomyl were most effective against these pathogens. Thus, to enhance the shelf life of Manaohong cherries and ensure their post-harvest quality, we recommend a pre-harvest spray of a SA, and combined with 5% hexaconazole and 50% benomyl. This approach not only promises enhanced cherry longevity but also lays a foundational strategy for the flourishing Manaohong Cherry industry. Full article
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18 pages, 56407 KiB  
Article
Pre-Harvest Application of Strigolactone (GR24) Accelerates Strawberry Ripening and Improves Fruit Quality
by Mengyao Li, Min Yang, Xiaoyang Liu, Guoyan Hou, Yuyan Jiang, Musha She, Caixia He, Yuting Peng, Yuanxiu Lin, Yunting Zhang, Yan Wang, Wen He, Qing Chen, Yong Zhang, Xiaorong Wang, Haoru Tang and Ya Luo
Agronomy 2023, 13(11), 2699; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy13112699 - 27 Oct 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 913
Abstract
GR24, a synthetic strigolactone analogue, plays a crucial role in a wide range of life processes. Studying the effects of the pre-harvest application of GR24 on strawberry ripening and fruit quality provides a scientific basis for the application of GR24 in horticultural crop [...] Read more.
GR24, a synthetic strigolactone analogue, plays a crucial role in a wide range of life processes. Studying the effects of the pre-harvest application of GR24 on strawberry ripening and fruit quality provides a scientific basis for the application of GR24 in horticultural crop production. GR24 solutions at concentrations of 0, 0.5, 1 and 2 µmol/L were applied to strawberries at the de-greening stage. The results showed that pre-harvest treatment with 1 µmol/L GR24 increased fruit weight and size; promoted fruit softening; increased the content of sugars, total flavonoids, total phenolics, and anthocyanins, and increased antioxidant activity. These results proved that GR24 effectively accelerated fruit ripening and improved fruit quality. In addition, to gain more insight into the biological mechanism of GR24 in fruit ripening, we conducted a combined transcriptomic and metabolomic analysis. It was found that the differences were related to sugar and flavonoid biosynthesis, particularly in the later stage of fruit ripening. qRT-PCR analysis revealed that GR24 increased gene expression activity and metabolite accumulation in the anthocyanin and sugar biosynthetic pathway, thereby promoting strawberry color and flavor. Full article
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14 pages, 3094 KiB  
Article
Postharvest Application of Sodium Selenite Maintains Fruit Quality and Improves the Gray Mold Resistance of Strawberry
by Yuanxiu Lin, Wenhao Liang, Shuaipeng Cao, Rui Tang, Zhi Mao, Gongchun Lan, Song Zhou, Yunting Zhang, Mengyao Li, Yan Wang, Qing Chen, Yong Zhang, Xiaorong Wang, Ya Luo and Haoru Tang
Agronomy 2023, 13(7), 1689; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy13071689 - 23 Jun 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 986
Abstract
Strawberry is a worldwide demanded edible fruit with high economic and nutritional value; however, a very short storage life largely limits its supply and marketing. In this study, strawberries were treated using sodium selenite with different concentrations (6, 12, 18, and 24 mg/L), [...] Read more.
Strawberry is a worldwide demanded edible fruit with high economic and nutritional value; however, a very short storage life largely limits its supply and marketing. In this study, strawberries were treated using sodium selenite with different concentrations (6, 12, 18, and 24 mg/L), and the postharvest fruit quality and resistance to Botrytis cinerea were substantially assessed. Among all concentrations, 12 mg/L Se was the most effective treatment, which maintained fruit skin brightness, reduced natural decay incidence, severity, and weight loss, increased the Se content in fruit, and thus maintained the postharvest fruit quality of the strawberry. Furthermore, strawberries treated with 12 mg/L Se had lower flavonoid, phenolic, anthocyanins, proanthocyanidins, H2O2, and O2 contents compared to the control and, correspondingly, lower antioxidant capacity; moreover, 12 mg/L Se treatment decreased the decay incidence and severity caused by the infection of B. cinerea. Collectively, our findings may provide a reference for developing safe and environmentally friendly alternative methods to sustain quality and manage gray mold in postharvest strawberries as well as other horticultural crops. Full article
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