Plant Production and Microorganism Potential in Modern Agro-Ecosystems-2nd Edition

A special issue of Agronomy (ISSN 2073-4395). This special issue belongs to the section "Farming Sustainability".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2024 | Viewed by 2728

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Guest Editor
Department of Soil Science and Microbiology, Poznan University of Life Sciences, 60-656 Poznan, Poland
Interests: plant-growth-promoting microorganisms; biofertilizers; sustainable plant production; soil biodiversity
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Guest Editor
Department of Agricultural Chemistry and Environmental Biogeochemistry, Poznan University of Life Sciences, Wojska Polskiego 71F, 60-625 Poznan, Poland
Interests: soil chemistry; nutrient recycling; fertilizers; biowastes; environmental science; ecology; trace elements; contamination
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Soil Science and Microbiology, Poznan University of Life Sciences, 60-656 Poznan, Poland
Interests: environmental microorganisms; biofertilizers; sustainable agriculture; microbiological indicators of soil fertility

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Meeting the nutritional needs of a dynamically developing global population is a major challenge. According to the forecast of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), by 2050, the world population will have exceeded nine billion, which will increase the demand for food.

Sustainable development strategies and programs implemented around the world include restrictions not only on the use of plant protection products and mineral fertilizers but also stimulating the development of organic farming, changing the eating habits of society, protecting and restoring ecosystems, and increasing the biodiversity of natural resources. To meet future food needs, research is required to maximize crop productivity without negatively impacting the environment.

For this Special Issue, we encourage you to submit your research and reports on the following topics:

  1. Modern aspects of the cultivation, fertilization, and protection of crops;
  2. Soil health and quality;
  3. Farming simplifications as a response to the challenges of sustainable agriculture;
  4. New sources of nutrients for plants;
  5. Biological methods aiming to improve the sustainability of agroecosystems;
  6. Current threats and prospects for the protection of agroecosystems.

Dr. Agnieszka Wolna-Maruwka
Prof. Dr. Jean Bernard Diatta
Dr. Justyna Starzyk
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Agronomy is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • agroecosystems
  • farming systems
  • sustainable agriculture
  • biodiversity
  • bioindicators
  • ecological quality

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

13 pages, 984 KiB  
Article
The Influence of Combined Pruning and the Use of Root Application of Two Biostimulants and Foliar Nutrition on the Growth and Flowering of Panicle Hydrangea Plants
by Sławomir Świerczyński and Ilona Świerczyńska
Agronomy 2024, 14(4), 687; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy14040687 - 27 Mar 2024
Viewed by 392
Abstract
The aim of this experiment was to assess how the interaction of two treatments influenced the growth and flowering of two varieties of Panicle hydrangea shrubs. The first treatment was plant pruning. Simultaneously, the plants received one of the three following treatments: root [...] Read more.
The aim of this experiment was to assess how the interaction of two treatments influenced the growth and flowering of two varieties of Panicle hydrangea shrubs. The first treatment was plant pruning. Simultaneously, the plants received one of the three following treatments: root application of Trichoderma atroviride, root application of BlackJak biostimulant, or foliar application of a multi-component fertilizer. Simultaneous pruning and inoculation of the plants with the Trichoderma atroviride mycelium improved the length of hydrangea shoots the most, as compared with the control plants (18%). These two treatments also increased the number of flowers (16–47%, depending on the variety) and the fresh weight of plants (10–28%) compared with the control plants. T. atroviride alone improved the number of flowers in both varieties (19–24%) and the diameter of inflorescences in the ‘Silver Dollar’ one (17%). The foliar nutrition increased the fresh weight of plants by 7–57%, depending on the cultivar and pruning. It also increased the diameter and number of inflorescences in one of the varieties. Together with pruning, it intensified the growth of shoots in both cultivars (5–10%). The BlackJak biostimulant treatment gave ambiguous results. In combination with pruning, it improved the length of shoots (15%) in one cultivar and the fresh weight in the other (18%). Without pruning, the treatment increased the number of flowers (16%) and the diameter of inflorescences (9%) in one cultivar. It increased the fresh weight of plants in both cultivars (19–21%). Regardless of the other treatments, pruning increased the length of the shoots and the fresh weight of the plants. On the other hand, it reduced the number of flowers and their diameter. In most cases, the biostimulant treatment and foliar fertilization improved the growth and flowering of the plants. In combination with pruning, they improved the growth of the hydrangea shrubs but reduced the number and diameter of flowers. The simultaneous Ta treatment and pruning were the most beneficial for the growth and flowering of the panicled hydrangea plants grown in containers in a nursery. Full article
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16 pages, 1466 KiB  
Article
Synergistic Interaction of Rhizobium tropici, Rhizophagus irregularis and Serendipita indica in Promoting Snap Bean Growth
by Hayet Beltayef, Mouna Mechri, Wafa Saidi, Taqi Raza, Rim Hajri, Afef Othmani, Khedija Bouajila, Cristina Cruz, Abeer Hashem, Elsayed Fathi Abd_Allah and Mongi Melki
Agronomy 2023, 13(10), 2619; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy13102619 - 14 Oct 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1400
Abstract
The overuse of chemical pesticides and fertilizers in crop farming has led to a decrease in crop quality and negative impacts on soil and the environment. It is crucial to adopt alternative strategies to maintain soil and environmental quality while enhancing crop growth [...] Read more.
The overuse of chemical pesticides and fertilizers in crop farming has led to a decrease in crop quality and negative impacts on soil and the environment. It is crucial to adopt alternative strategies to maintain soil and environmental quality while enhancing crop growth and yield. To explore this, a study was conducted under greenhouse conditions to investigate the effect of Rhizobium tropici CIAT 899 alone, as well as in association with mycorrhizae (Rhizophagus irregularis) and endophytic fungus (Serendipita indica), on the growth, yield, and nutrient status of snap bean plants. At harvest, the rhizobial strain CIAT 899 demonstrated the highest effectiveness. It significantly increased the number of nodules in both Contender and Garrafal Enana varieties by 6.97% and 14.81%, respectively, compared with the control without inoculation. Furthermore, the results indicated that co-inoculation of Rhizobium and symbiotic fungi had positive effects on nitrogen content, phosphorus availability, and overall plant growth. Regardless of the variety, plants inoculated with R. tropici CIAT 899 and Serendipita indica exhibited the highest values for plant growth parameters. This combination resulted in 168% and 135% increases in root dry biomass, as well as 140% and 225% increases in the number of pods for Contender and Garrafal Enana, respectively, compared with the control at harvest. Additionally, this study highlights the potential benefits of combining R. tropici with either Serendipita indica or Rhizophagus irregularis in terms of nitrogen and phosphorus uptake. These symbiotic microorganisms demonstrated synergistic interactions with snap bean plants, leading to improved mineral nutrition and enhanced growth. Overall, these findings suggest that utilizing these symbiotic microorganisms can effectively enhance the mineral nutrition and growth of snap bean plants. Full article
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21 pages, 2920 KiB  
Article
The Effect of Biofumigation on the Microbiome Composition in Replanted Soil in a Fruit Tree Nursery
by Robert Wieczorek, Zofia Zydlik, Agnieszka Wolna-Maruwka, Alicja Niewiadomska and Dariusz Kayzer
Agronomy 2023, 13(10), 2507; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy13102507 - 28 Sep 2023
Viewed by 701
Abstract
The imbalance of the soil microbiome is a primary indicator of ARD (apple replant disease). Biofumigation is a treatment that enables the restoration of microbiome balance. This study involved an analysis of the taxonomic and functional diversity of bacterial communities in replanted soil [...] Read more.
The imbalance of the soil microbiome is a primary indicator of ARD (apple replant disease). Biofumigation is a treatment that enables the restoration of microbiome balance. This study involved an analysis of the taxonomic and functional diversity of bacterial communities in replanted soil (ARD), in replanted soils with forecrops of French marigold (Tagetes patula L.), white mustard (Sinapis alba), and oilseed radish (Raphanus sativus var. oleifera), and in agricultural soil. The biofumigation treatment with phytosanitary plants changed the structure and abundance of the replanted soil microbiome in a fruit tree nursery. The count of operational taxonomic units (OTU) of the Proteobacteria, Bacteroidota, Patescibacteria, Chloroflexi, and Verrucomicrobiota phyla increased, whereas the count of the Firmicutes, Acidobacteriota, and Actinobacteriota phyla decreased. Biofumigation caused an increase in the content of some dominant bacterial genera, such as Flavobacterium, Massila, Sphingomonas, Arenimonas, and Devosia, in the replanted soil. Their presence in the soil may improve the growth of plants, induce their systemic resistance, and thus improve the production properties of soil with ARD. The research results led to the conclusion that the use of phytosanitary plants in nursery production can be an effective alternative to the chemical fumigation of soil. Full article
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