Special Issue "Integrated Pest Management of Field Crops"

A special issue of Agriculture (ISSN 2077-0472). This special issue belongs to the section "Crop Protection, Diseases, Pest and Weeds".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 March 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Renata Bažok
Website SciProfiles
Guest Editor
Department for Agricultural Zoology, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Zagreb, Svetosimunska 25, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia
Interests: western corn rootworm; wireworms; pests of sugar beet; pests of potato and brassica crops; resistance of insect pests to pesticides; other pests of field and vegetable crops; side effects of insecticides (beneficial organisms and ecotoxicology); integrated pest management; biological and botanical insecticides
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Special Issue Information

Respected Colleagues,

In this Special Issue, we focus on recent advances in and methods for integrated pest management (IPM) in field crops. As a cornerstone of sustainable agriculture, IPM seeks to improve farmer practices in order to create higher profits while improving the environment’s quality. The implementation of IPM principles in agricultural production requires new and updated knowledge generated by science and accepted by farmers. We welcome papers dealing with the development of long-term strategies for the minimization of pest and disease occurrence, preferably by enhancing natural control mechanisms to grow a “healthy crop”. We are interested in all varieties of field crops. Specifically, we are interested in papers dealing with the use of resistant cultivars and varieties, cultural practices that minimize pressure from and maximize biological control over pests and diseases, the development of indicators for quantitative assessment of the balance between pests and beneficial organisms, the development and application of novel techniques for pest and disease forecasting, the use of non-chemical pest and disease management practices, and the development and testing of alternatives to chemical pesticides, biological pest control agents that include microbial and botanical pesticides, and semiochemicals, all of which can be valuable components of IPM.

If you are unsure as to whether your manuscript falls within the scope of this Special Issue, please feel free to send us an abstract.

Prof. Renata Bažok
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Agriculture is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • integrated pest management
  • field crops

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Neonicotinoid Residues in Sugar Beet Plants and Soil under Different Agro-Climatic Conditions
Agriculture 2020, 10(10), 484; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture10100484 - 19 Oct 2020
Abstract
European sugar beet was mostly grown from seeds treated by neonicotinoids which provided efficient control of some important sugar beet pests (aphids and flea beetles). The EU commission regulation from 2018 to ultimately restrict the outdoor application of imidacloprid, thiamethoxam, and clothianidin could [...] Read more.
European sugar beet was mostly grown from seeds treated by neonicotinoids which provided efficient control of some important sugar beet pests (aphids and flea beetles). The EU commission regulation from 2018 to ultimately restrict the outdoor application of imidacloprid, thiamethoxam, and clothianidin could significantly affect European sugar beet production. Although alternative insecticides (spinosad, chlorantraniliprole, neem) are shown to have certain effects on particular pests when applied as seed treatment, it is not likely that in near future any insecticide will be identified as a good candidate for neonicotinoids’ substitution. The aim of this research is to evaluate residue levels (LC-MS/MS method) of imidacloprid and thiamethoxam applied as seed dressing in sugar beet plants during two growing seasons in fields located in different agro-climatic regions and in greenhouse trials. In 2015, 25 to 27 days post planting (PP) maximum of 0.028% of imidacloprid and 0.077% of thiamethoxam were recovered from the emerged plants, respectively. In 2016, the recovery rate from the emerged plants 40 days PP was 0.003% for imidacloprid and 50 days PP was up to 0.022% for thiamethoxam. There were no neonicotinoid residues above the maximum residue level in roots at the time of harvesting, except in case of samples from thiamethoxam variant collected from greenhouse trials in 2016 (0.053 mg/kg). The results of this research lead to the conclusion that the seed treatment of sugar beet leaves minimal trace in plants because of the complete degradation while different behavior has been observed in the two fields and a glasshouse trial regarding the residues in soil. Dry conditions, leaching incapacity, or irregular flushing can result in higher concentrations in soil which can present potential risk for the succeeding crops. The results of our study could provide additional arguments about possible risk assessment for seed treatment in sugar beet. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Integrated Pest Management of Field Crops)
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Open AccessArticle
Farmers’ Knowledge and Management Practices of Fall Armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith) in Benin, West Africa
Agriculture 2020, 10(10), 430; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture10100430 - 25 Sep 2020
Abstract
Spodoptera frugiperda has caused significant losses of farmer income in sub-Saharan countries since 2016. This study assessed farmers’ knowledge of S. frugiperda, their perceptions and management practices in Benin. Data were collected through a national survey of 1237 maize farmers. Ninety-one point [...] Read more.
Spodoptera frugiperda has caused significant losses of farmer income in sub-Saharan countries since 2016. This study assessed farmers’ knowledge of S. frugiperda, their perceptions and management practices in Benin. Data were collected through a national survey of 1237 maize farmers. Ninety-one point eight percent of farmers recognized S. frugiperda damage, 78.9% of them were able to identify its larvae, and 93.9% of the maize fields were infested. According to farmers, the perceived yield losses amounted to 797.2 kg/ha of maize, representing 49% of the average maize yield commonly obtained by farmers. Chi-square tests revealed that the severity of the pest attacks was significantly associated with cropping practices and types of grown maize varieties. About 16% of farmers identified francolin (Francolinus bicalcaratus), village weaver (Ploceus cucullatus), and common wasp (Vespula vulgaris) as natural enemies and 5% of them identified yellow nutsedge, chan, shea tree, neem, tamarind, and soybean as repellent plants of S. frugiperda. Most farmers (91.4%) used synthetic pesticides and 1.9% of them used botanical pesticides, which they found more effective than synthetic pesticides. Significant relationships exist between farmers’ management practices, their knowledge, organization membership, and contact with research and extension services. More research is required to further understand the effectiveness of botanical pesticides made by farmers against S. frugiperda and to refine them for scaling-up. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Integrated Pest Management of Field Crops)
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