Special Issue "Magnetorheological Fluids, Devices, and Integrated Adaptive Systems"

A special issue of Actuators (ISSN 2076-0825).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 June 2017).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Norman M. Wereley
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Maryland, 3179J Martin Hall, College Park, MD 20742, USA
Interests: smart materials and structures; actuators; sensors; dampers; energy absorbers; pneumatic artificial muscles; control systems; applications to aircraft; ground vehicles; robotic systems
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Seung-bok Choi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Mechanical Engineering, The State University of New York at Korea (SUNY Korea), 119 Songdo Moonhwa-Ro, Yeonsu-Gu, Incheon 21985, Korea
Interests: magnetorheological (MR) fluid; electrorheological (ER) fluid; polymer particles; magnetic particles; vibration control; haptic devices using MR/ER fluids; sensors and actuators using MR/ER fluids
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue includes, but is not limited to, the following topics:

  • Fundamental studies in the physics of magnetorheology and magnetorheological materials and composites, chemistry of carrier fluids, matrices, and additives, as well as ferromagnetic particle synthesis and associated coatings.
  • Use of magnetorheological materials, including fluids and elastomers, in energy absorbing elements to mitigate vibration and shock spectra for problems ranging from occupant and payload protection in air, sea, and ground vehicles; mine blast mitigation in sea and ground vehicles; adaptive energy absorbing landing gear systems, machinery and engine mounts, and other associated problems.
  • Integrated systems incorporating sensors, energy absorbers and control systems to optimally mitigate vibration or shock spectra, or to augment stability of vehicle systems, or other applications.

Prof. Dr. Norman M. Wereley
Prof. Dr. Seung-Bok Choi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Actuators is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Design and Evaluation of a Semi-Active Magneto-rheological Mount for a Wheel Loader Cabin
Actuators 2017, 6(2), 16; https://doi.org/10.3390/act6020016 - 20 Apr 2017
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 4949
Abstract
In this study, a semi-active magneto-rheological (MR) mount is designed and manufactured to minimize unwanted vibrations for the cabin of heavy vehicles. Normally, working conditions in heavy vehicles are extremely rugged. Usually, the heavy vehicles use passive rubber mounts for the reduction of [...] Read more.
In this study, a semi-active magneto-rheological (MR) mount is designed and manufactured to minimize unwanted vibrations for the cabin of heavy vehicles. Normally, working conditions in heavy vehicles are extremely rugged. Usually, the heavy vehicles use passive rubber mounts for the reduction of vibrations from road. However, the passive mount has definite performance limitations because the passive mount has a fixed resonance frequency when the design is finished. An MR application is one of the solutions because the viscosity of MR fluid can be controlled. As a first step, an experimental apparatus was established for performance evaluation of the mounts. The apparatus has hydraulic excitatory, force, and displacement sensors. Performance of two different passive mounts used in industrial fields were evaluated. The passive mount data of force-displacement, force-velocity, and displacement transmissibility were collected and tested. After that, an MR mount was designed and manufactured that provides better performance using the passive mount data. The MR mount uses two different flow paths, annular duct and radial channels, for generating the required damping force. The field-dependent damping forces were then evaluated with respect to the moving stroke and input current. In this work, in order to control the damping force, an on-off controller associated with the fast Fourier transform (FFT) was used. The control results of the MR mount were compared with the results of passive rubber mounts. It was shown that the semi-active MR mount can attenuate vibrations more effectively at all frequency ranges compared with the passive rubber mount. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Magnetorheological Fluids, Devices, and Integrated Adaptive Systems)
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Article
MR Damper Controlled Vibration Absorber for Enhanced Mitigation of Harmonic Vibrations
Actuators 2016, 5(4), 27; https://doi.org/10.3390/act5040027 - 21 Dec 2016
Cited by 19 | Viewed by 5941
Abstract
This paper describes a semi-active vibration absorber (SVA) concept based on a real-time controlled magnetorheological damper (MR-SVA) for the enhanced mitigation of structural vibrations due to harmonic disturbing forces. The force of the MR damper is controlled in real-time to generate the frequency [...] Read more.
This paper describes a semi-active vibration absorber (SVA) concept based on a real-time controlled magnetorheological damper (MR-SVA) for the enhanced mitigation of structural vibrations due to harmonic disturbing forces. The force of the MR damper is controlled in real-time to generate the frequency and damping controls according to the behaviour of the undamped vibration absorber for the actual frequency of vibration. As stiffness and damping emulations in semi-active actuators are coupled quantities the control is formulated to prioritize the frequency control by the controlled stiffness. The control algorithm is augmented by a stiffness correction method ensuring precise frequency control when the desired control force is constrained by the semi-active restriction and residual force of the MR damper. The force tracking task is solved by a model-based feed forward with feedback correction. The MR-SVA is numerically and experimentally validated for the primary structure with nominal eigenfrequency and when de-tuning of −10%, −5%, +5% and +10% is present. Both validations demonstrate that the MR-SVA improves the vibration reduction in the primary structure by up to 55% compared to the passive tuned mass damper (TMD). Furthermore, it is shown that the MR-SVA with only 80% of tuned mass leads to approximately the same enhanced performance while the associated increased relative motion amplitude of the tuned mass is more than compensated be the reduced dimensions of the mass. Therefore, the MR-SVA is an appropriate solution for the mitigation of tall buildings where the pendulum mass can be up to several thousands of metric tonnes and space for the pendulum damper is limited. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Magnetorheological Fluids, Devices, and Integrated Adaptive Systems)
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