Special Issue "Feature Papers for J-Multidisciplinary Scientific Journal"

A special issue of J (ISSN 2571-8800).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 November 2018)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Pietro Cipresso

1 Department of Psychology, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Milan, Italy
2 Applied Technology for Neuro-Psychology Lab, IRCCS Istituto Auxologico Italiano, Milan, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Phone: 3667175081
Interests: psychometrics; biostatistics; complex systems and computational modeling; psychophysiology methods; biosensors and biomedical signal processing; virtual reality methods and computational science
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. James David Adams

School of Pharmacy, University of Southern California, 1985 Zonal Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90089, USA
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +1-(323)-442-1362
Interests: chronic pain; severe pain; plant medicines; traditional healing; California Indian healing
Guest Editor
Prof. Angelo Maria Sabatini

The BioRobotics Institute, Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna, Piazza Martiri della Libertà 33, 56124 Pisa, Italy
E-Mail
Interests: wearable sensor systems for human motion capture; methods of human performance assessment; magneto-inertial measurement units; methods of signal processing for wearable sensors; sensor fusion

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

As Editors-in-Chief of J-Multidisciplinary Scientific Journal, we are glad to announce this Special Issue, "Feature Papers". This Special Issue will be a collection of articles from top researchers describing new approaches or new cutting-edge developments in the entire range of natural, applied, social, and formal sciences. We welcome the submission of manuscripts from Editorial Board Members and from outstanding scholars invited by the Editorial Board and the Editorial Office.

Our goal is to provide fast dissemination of new research results and ideas, and to allow research groups to create new studies, innovations and knowledge without delay.

You are welcome to send short proposals for submissions of Feature Papers to our Editorial Office ([email protected]) for evaluation.

Dr. Pietro Cipresso
Prof. Dr. James David Adams
Dr. Angelo Maria Sabatini
Editors-in-Chief and Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. J is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (16 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Artisanal and Small-Scale Mining Sites in the Democratic Republic of the Congo Are Not Associated with Nighttime Light Emissions
J 2019, 2(2), 152-161; https://doi.org/10.3390/j2020013
Received: 28 March 2019 / Revised: 12 April 2019 / Accepted: 16 April 2019 / Published: 20 April 2019
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Abstract
Maintaining records of artisanal and small-scale mining sites in developing countries requires considerable effort, so it would be beneficial if Earth observation data from space could assist in the identifying and monitoring of such sites. Artificial light emissions are common at industrial-scale mining [...] Read more.
Maintaining records of artisanal and small-scale mining sites in developing countries requires considerable effort, so it would be beneficial if Earth observation data from space could assist in the identifying and monitoring of such sites. Artificial light emissions are common at industrial-scale mining sites and have been associated with small-scale illegal mining in some contexts. Here, we examine whether known artisanal and small-scale mining sites in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) are associated with observations of night light emissions by the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite Day/Night Band (DNB). Light emissions from the mining sites were not observed: the radiance observed from the sites was near zero and nearly identical to that observed for a set of randomly-chosen locations in the same region. While it is the case that DNB night lights’ products provide useful data in other resource extraction contexts, they do not appear to be useful for identifying artisanal mining sites in the DRC. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers for J-Multidisciplinary Scientific Journal)
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Open AccessArticle
The 2016 US Presidential Elections: What Went Wrong in Pre-Election Polls? Demographics Help to Explain
J 2019, 2(1), 84-101; https://doi.org/10.3390/j2010007
Received: 14 December 2018 / Revised: 1 February 2019 / Accepted: 25 February 2019 / Published: 1 March 2019
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Abstract
This study examined the accuracy of the various forecasting methods of the 2016 US Presidential Elections. The findings revealed a high accuracy in predicting the popular vote. However, this is most suitable in an electoral system which is not divided into constituencies. Instead, [...] Read more.
This study examined the accuracy of the various forecasting methods of the 2016 US Presidential Elections. The findings revealed a high accuracy in predicting the popular vote. However, this is most suitable in an electoral system which is not divided into constituencies. Instead, due to the Electoral College method used in the US elections, forecasting should focus on predicting the winner in every state separately. Nevertheless, miss-predicted results in only a few states led to false forecasting of the elected president in 2016. The current methods proved less accurate in predicting the vote in states that are less urbanized and with less diverse society regarding race, ethnicity, and religion. The most challenging was predicting the vote of people who are White, Protestant Christians, and highly religious. In order to improve pre-election polls, this study suggests a few changes to the current methods, mainly to adopt the “Cleavage Sampling” method that can better predict the expected turnout of specific social groups, thus leading to higher accuracy of pre-election polling. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers for J-Multidisciplinary Scientific Journal)
Open AccessArticle
Approach for Intuitive and Touchless Interaction in the Operating Room
Received: 17 December 2018 / Revised: 15 January 2019 / Accepted: 21 January 2019 / Published: 23 January 2019
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Abstract
The consultation of medical images, 2D or 3D, has a crucial role for planned or ongoing surgical operations. During an intervention, this consultation induces a sterility loss for the surgeon due to the fact that the classical interaction devices are non-sterile. A solution [...] Read more.
The consultation of medical images, 2D or 3D, has a crucial role for planned or ongoing surgical operations. During an intervention, this consultation induces a sterility loss for the surgeon due to the fact that the classical interaction devices are non-sterile. A solution to this problem would be to replace conventional devices by touchless interaction technologies, thereby enabling sterile interventions. In this paper, we present the conceptual development of an intuitive “gesture vocabulary” allowing the implementation of an effective touchless interactive system that is well adapted to the specificities of the surgical context. Our methodology and its implementation as well as our results are detailed. The suggested methodology and its implementation were both shown to be a valid approach to integrating this mean of interaction in the operating room. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers for J-Multidisciplinary Scientific Journal)
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Open AccessArticle
Concept and Implementation of a Two-Stage Coding Scheme for the Development of Computer-Based Testing (CBT)-Items in Traditional Test Software
Received: 14 November 2018 / Revised: 27 December 2018 / Accepted: 16 January 2019 / Published: 18 January 2019
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Abstract
Computer-based testing (CBT) is gaining importance for studies addressing the diagnosis of competencies, because it is possible to simulate authentic action situations and may reduce the effort of analyzing the data. This benefit is most important for the phase of item design. In [...] Read more.
Computer-based testing (CBT) is gaining importance for studies addressing the diagnosis of competencies, because it is possible to simulate authentic action situations and may reduce the effort of analyzing the data. This benefit is most important for the phase of item design. In this phase of assessment construction, the pattern of answers of a sample is used to draw conclusions on the functionality of the items. Currently, there are no standards for the encodement of items which consider the specifications of CBT-instruments. These specifications are, for example, the a posteriori non-variability of the coding, a lack of information when using conventional test scores and the need of standardization of different formats of items. Taking these specifications into consideration, this paper proposes and discusses a two-stage coding systematization for CBT-items. For this, a distinction between item-coding and answer-coding was done. The coding is discussed for single-section and multi-section formats as well as dichotomous and polytomous answer modes. Therefore, this paper is for users of CBT-instruments who want to achieve the optimal information value of their test results with efficient coding. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers for J-Multidisciplinary Scientific Journal)
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Open AccessArticle
Ionic Imbalances and Coupling in Synchronization of Responses in Neurons
Received: 27 November 2018 / Revised: 21 December 2018 / Accepted: 4 January 2019 / Published: 10 January 2019
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Abstract
Most neurodegenerative diseases (NDD) are a result of changes in the chemical composition of neurons. For example, Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the product of Aβ peptide deposition which results in changes in the ion concentration. These changes in ion concentration affect the responses [...] Read more.
Most neurodegenerative diseases (NDD) are a result of changes in the chemical composition of neurons. For example, Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the product of Aβ peptide deposition which results in changes in the ion concentration. These changes in ion concentration affect the responses of the neuron to stimuli and often result in inducing excessive excitation or inhibition. This paper investigates the dynamics of a single neuron as ion changes occur. These changes are incorporated using the Nernst equation. Within the central and peripheral nervous system, signals and hence rhythms, are propagated through the coupling of the neurons. It was found that under certain conditions the coupling strength between two neurons could mitigate changes in ion concentration. By defining the state of perfect synchrony, it was shown that the effect of ion imbalance in coupled neurons was reduced while in uncoupled neurons these changes had a more significant impact on the neuronal behavior. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers for J-Multidisciplinary Scientific Journal)
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Open AccessArticle
Computational Investigation of Amyloid Peptide Channels in Alzheimer’s Disease
Received: 27 November 2018 / Revised: 17 December 2018 / Accepted: 21 December 2018 / Published: 25 December 2018
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Abstract
Aβ accumulation has been discovered to form large, relatively cation-permeable channels in the plasma membrane of a neuron. These channel formations in the membranes of a neuron could cause cell depolarisation, sodium and potassium dysregulation, depletion of neural energy stores and other types [...] Read more.
Aβ accumulation has been discovered to form large, relatively cation-permeable channels in the plasma membrane of a neuron. These channel formations in the membranes of a neuron could cause cell depolarisation, sodium and potassium dysregulation, depletion of neural energy stores and other types of cellular dysfunction. This study shows that the build-up of amyloid beta (Aβ) depositions during the onset of Alzheimer’s disease has profound effects on the activity of the local community of neurons in the central nervous system. These effects can include enhanced neural activity, spontaneous epileptiform activity and incidence of epileptic seizures. From the results in this area, it can be seen that the neurodegeneration observed in Alzheimer’s disease has been associated with the increase of toxicity of Aβ depositions. In this research paper, we examined this hypothesis in light of a computational model of a neuron. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers for J-Multidisciplinary Scientific Journal)
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Open AccessArticle
Nonparametric Conditional Heteroscedastic Hourly Probabilistic Forecasting of Solar Radiation
J 2018, 1(1), 174-191; https://doi.org/10.3390/j1010016
Received: 26 October 2018 / Revised: 17 November 2018 / Accepted: 29 November 2018 / Published: 4 December 2018
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Abstract
We develop a new probabilistic forecasting method for global horizontal irradiation (GHI) by extending our previous bootstrap method to a case of an exponentially decaying heteroscedastic model for tracking dynamics in solar radiance. Our previous method catered for the global systematic variation in [...] Read more.
We develop a new probabilistic forecasting method for global horizontal irradiation (GHI) by extending our previous bootstrap method to a case of an exponentially decaying heteroscedastic model for tracking dynamics in solar radiance. Our previous method catered for the global systematic variation in variance of solar radiation, whereas our new method also caters for the local variation in variance. We test the performance of our new probabilistic forecasting method against our old probabilistic forecasting method at three locations: Adelaide, Darwin, and Mildura. These locations are chosen to represent three distinct climates. The prediction interval coverage probability, prediction interval normalized averaged width and Winkler score results from our new probabilistic forecasting method are encouraging. Our new method performs better than our previous method at Adelaide and Mildura; regions with a higher proportion of clear-sky days, whereas our previous method performs better than our new method at Darwin; a region with a lower proportion of clear-sky days. These results suggest that the ideal probabilistic forecasting method might be climate specific. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers for J-Multidisciplinary Scientific Journal)
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Open AccessArticle
Relationship between the Use of Parabens and Allergic Diseases in Japanese Adults—A Cross-Sectional Study
J 2018, 1(1), 148-158; https://doi.org/10.3390/j1010014
Received: 28 September 2018 / Revised: 26 October 2018 / Accepted: 30 October 2018 / Published: 4 November 2018
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Abstract
It currently remains unclear whether parabens, which are preservatives added to cosmetics, shampoos, and personal care products that exhibit biocidal activities, exert allergic effects in adults. The aim of the present study was to examine the relationship between the use of parabens and [...] Read more.
It currently remains unclear whether parabens, which are preservatives added to cosmetics, shampoos, and personal care products that exhibit biocidal activities, exert allergic effects in adults. The aim of the present study was to examine the relationship between the use of parabens and the prevalence of allergic diseases in Japanese adults. This population-based cross-sectional study comprised 2005 participants aged 40 years or older living in Shika Town in Japan who answered a self-administered questionnaire on allergic diseases and the daily use of household goods. The information obtained was then analyzed to assess the exposure to parabens (response rate: 77.9%). The prevalence of nasal allergies, atopic conjunctivitis, and total allergies was significantly higher in women who used parabens. These differences remained significant after adjustments for confounding factors including age, body mass index, smoking, alcohol, exercise, sleep, income, education, and marital status. No relationship between the prevalence of atopic dermatitis and the use of parabens was observed in men or women. However, the present results demonstrated that the prevalence of nasal allergies and atopic conjunctivitis was associated with use of parabens in women, suggesting that parabens may induce allergic responses. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers for J-Multidisciplinary Scientific Journal)
Open AccessArticle
Study of the Influence of Different Yeast Strains on Red Wine Fermentation with NIR Spectroscopy and Principal Component Analysis
J 2018, 1(1), 133-147; https://doi.org/10.3390/j1010013
Received: 3 October 2018 / Revised: 23 October 2018 / Accepted: 27 October 2018 / Published: 31 October 2018
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Abstract
Alcoholic fermentation is a key step in wine production. Indeed, a wide range of compounds, which strongly affect the sensory properties of wine, is produced during this process. While Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cultures are commonly employed in winemaking to carry on the fermentation [...] Read more.
Alcoholic fermentation is a key step in wine production. Indeed, a wide range of compounds, which strongly affect the sensory properties of wine, is produced during this process. While Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cultures are commonly employed in winemaking to carry on the fermentation process, some non-Saccharomyces species have recently gained attention due to their ability to produce various metabolites of oenological interest. The use of different yeasts strains usually results in wines with different sensory properties, despite being obtained from the same grape variety. In this paper, we tested the feasibility of using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIR) to discriminate among red wines from three different grape varieties produced with pure S. cerevisiae or by mixed fermentation with a promising non-Saccharomyces yeast, namely the Starmeriella bacillaris, which usually yields wines with significant amounts of glycerol and low levels of ethanol, acetic acid, and acetaldehyde. A principal component analysis (PCA) performed on the NIR spectra was used to search for differences in the samples. The NIR results have been compared with both basic wine parameters and sensory analysis data. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers for J-Multidisciplinary Scientific Journal)
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Open AccessArticle
First Assessment of the Thryssa vitrirostris (Engraulidae) Beach Seine Fishery in Northeastern Mozambique
J 2018, 1(1), 116-132; https://doi.org/10.3390/j1010012
Received: 20 September 2018 / Revised: 9 October 2018 / Accepted: 11 October 2018 / Published: 15 October 2018
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Abstract
Monthly length-frequency data, from 2009 to 2014, was used to estimate the growth parameters, mortality, and spawning season, and to assess the exploitation status of Thryssa vitrirostris (Engraulidae) fisheries in Pebane. The von Bertalanffy asymptotic length (L) and growth rate (K) [...] Read more.
Monthly length-frequency data, from 2009 to 2014, was used to estimate the growth parameters, mortality, and spawning season, and to assess the exploitation status of Thryssa vitrirostris (Engraulidae) fisheries in Pebane. The von Bertalanffy asymptotic length (L) and growth rate (K) were 25.1 cm (standard length) and 0.41 per year (standard length), respectively. Two proxy recruitment peaks were found: the first peak of recruitment occurs from April to July, and the second recruitment peak from September to October. The total estimated mortality rates (Z), natural mortality (M), and fishing mortality (F) were Z = 1.31, M = 0.92, and F = 0.39. For the beach seine gear, the size at first catch of T. vitrirostris was Lc25 = 4.43 cm. The 50% retention size of the catch was Lc50 = 5.39 cm. The retention probability analyses revealed a large rate of juvenile fishing mortality (54.2%). The estimated exploitation rate (0.30) was below the maximum exploitation rate (0.48), and above the optimal sustainable exploitation rate (E50 = 0.28), evidencing a sustainable fishery. However, under such an exploitation regime, it is advised that a continuously monitoring-survey of T. vitrirostris is maintained. An increase in migration of fishermen has been recently recorded in Pebane, due to its rich fisheries, which can increase the fishing effort and the risk of overexploitation if management measures (such as mesh size increase) are not taken in advance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers for J-Multidisciplinary Scientific Journal)
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Open AccessCommunication
Receptor Regulation in Taste: Can Diet Influence How We Perceive Foods?
J 2018, 1(1), 106-115; https://doi.org/10.3390/j1010011
Received: 26 September 2018 / Revised: 8 October 2018 / Accepted: 10 October 2018 / Published: 14 October 2018
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Abstract
Taste buds are the dedicated sensory end organs of taste, comprising a complex and evolving profile of signaling elements. The sensation and ultimate perception of taste depends on the expression of a diverse array of receptors and channels that sense their respective tastes. [...] Read more.
Taste buds are the dedicated sensory end organs of taste, comprising a complex and evolving profile of signaling elements. The sensation and ultimate perception of taste depends on the expression of a diverse array of receptors and channels that sense their respective tastes. Receptor regulation is a recognized and well-studied phenomenon in many systems, observed in opioid addiction, insulin resistance and caffeine tolerance. Results from human sensory studies suggest that receptor sensitivity or expression level may decrease after chronic exposure to respective tastants through diet. We review data supporting the theory that taste receptors may become downregulated with exposure to a specific tastant, along with presenting data from a small pilot study, showing the impact of long-term tastant exposure on taste receptor expression in mice. Mice treated with monosodium salt monohydrate (MSG), saccharin and NaCl (typically appetitive tastes) all displayed a significant decrease in mRNA expression for respective umami, sweet and salty receptors/sensory channels. Reduced sensitivity to appetitive tastes may promote overconsumption of foods high in such stimuli. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers for J-Multidisciplinary Scientific Journal)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
A Review of Seven Applications of Neutrosophic Logic: In Cultural Psychology, Economics Theorizing, Conflict Resolution, Philosophy of Science, etc.
J 2019, 2(2), 128-137; https://doi.org/10.3390/j2020010
Received: 5 March 2019 / Revised: 14 March 2019 / Accepted: 15 March 2019 / Published: 29 March 2019
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Abstract
In this short communication, we review seven applications of NFL that we have explored in a number of papers: (1) Background: the purpose of this study is to review how neutrosophic logic can be found useful in a number of diverse areas of [...] Read more.
In this short communication, we review seven applications of NFL that we have explored in a number of papers: (1) Background: the purpose of this study is to review how neutrosophic logic can be found useful in a number of diverse areas of interest; (2) Methods: we use logical analysis based on NL; (3) Results: some fields of study may be found elevated after analyzed by NL theory; and (4) Conclusions: we can expect NL theory to be applied in many areas of research too, in applied mathematics, economics, and physics. Hopefully the readers will find a continuing line of thoughts in our research from the last few years. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers for J-Multidisciplinary Scientific Journal)
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Open AccessReview
Effects of Red Ginseng on Neural Injuries with Reference to the Molecular Mechanisms
J 2019, 2(2), 116-127; https://doi.org/10.3390/j2020009
Received: 13 March 2019 / Revised: 24 March 2019 / Accepted: 26 March 2019 / Published: 28 March 2019
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Abstract
Red ginseng, as an effective herbal medicine, has been traditionally and empirically used for the treatment of neuronal diseases. Many studies suggest that red ginseng and its ingredients protect the brain and spinal cord from neural injuries such as ischemia, trauma, and neurodegeneration. [...] Read more.
Red ginseng, as an effective herbal medicine, has been traditionally and empirically used for the treatment of neuronal diseases. Many studies suggest that red ginseng and its ingredients protect the brain and spinal cord from neural injuries such as ischemia, trauma, and neurodegeneration. This review focuses on the molecular mechanisms underlying the neuroprotective effects of red ginseng and its ingredients. Ginsenoside Rb1 and other ginsenosides are regarded as the active ingredients of red ginseng; the anti-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-oxidative actions of ginsenosides, together with a series of bioactive molecules relevant to the above actions, appear to account for the neuroprotective effects in vivo and/or in vitro. Moreover, in this review, the possibility is raised that more effective or stable neuroprotective derivatives based on the chemical structures of ginsenosides could be developed. Although further studies, including clinical trials, are necessary to confirm the pharmacological properties of red ginseng and its ingredients, red ginseng and its ingredients could be promising candidate drugs for the treatment of neural injuries. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers for J-Multidisciplinary Scientific Journal)
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Open AccessReview
Gamification Concepts to Promote and Maintain Therapy Adherence in Children with Growth Hormone Deficiency
Received: 25 July 2018 / Revised: 23 August 2018 / Accepted: 25 August 2018 / Published: 31 August 2018
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Abstract
Growth hormone (GH) deficiency affects up to one in 4000 children and is usually treated with daily injections of GH whilst the child is still growing. With children typically diagnosed at around five years old, this can mean over 10 years of therapy, [...] Read more.
Growth hormone (GH) deficiency affects up to one in 4000 children and is usually treated with daily injections of GH whilst the child is still growing. With children typically diagnosed at around five years old, this can mean over 10 years of therapy, which can place a considerable burden on the child and the parent. Over three-quarters of children are estimated to be not fully compliant with therapy, which can compromise their chances of attaining their target height. In recent years, interactive mobile health (smart phone or tablet) interventions using game-like concepts, so called ‘gamification’, have increased in popularity and have demonstrated success in promoting positive self-management behaviour in children with chronic conditions, such as diabetes. The application of gamified interventions has the potential to support adherence to therapy and positive behaviour in children with GH deficiency in a number of ways: (1) By providing education in a format that the child understands and accepts (e.g., using behavioural constructs to facilitate explaining why adherence is important); (2) By providing a mechanism to reduce the anxiety and stress associated with administering the injection (e.g., diversion with a virtual pet); and (3) By providing feedback to encourage ongoing engagement (e.g., rewards, progression through levels). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers for J-Multidisciplinary Scientific Journal)
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Other

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Open AccessTechnical Note
Comparison among Methods and Statistical Software Packages to Analyze Germplasm Genetic Diversity by Means of Codominant Markers
J 2018, 1(1), 197-215; https://doi.org/10.3390/j1010018
Received: 12 September 2018 / Revised: 3 December 2018 / Accepted: 5 December 2018 / Published: 7 December 2018
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Abstract
Co-dominant markers’ data are often analysed as if they were dominant markers, an over-simplification that may be misleading. Addressing this, the present paper aims to provide a practical guide to the analysis of co-dominant data and selection of suitable software. An overview is [...] Read more.
Co-dominant markers’ data are often analysed as if they were dominant markers, an over-simplification that may be misleading. Addressing this, the present paper aims to provide a practical guide to the analysis of co-dominant data and selection of suitable software. An overview is provided of the computational methods and basic principles necessary for statistical analyses of co-dominant molecular markers to determine genetic diversity and molecular characterization of germplasm collections. The Hardy–Weinberg principle is at the base of statistical methods to determine genetic distance, genetic diversity, and its distribution among and within populations. Six statistical software packages named GenAlEx, GDA, Power Marker, Cervus, Arlequin, and Structure are compared and contrasted. The different software packages were selected based on: (i) The ability to analyze co-dominant data, (ii) open access software, (iii) ease of downloading, and (iv) ease of running using a Microsoft Window interface. The software packages are compared analyzing the same dataset. Differences among parameters are discussed together with the comments on some of the software outputs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers for J-Multidisciplinary Scientific Journal)
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Open AccessBrief Report
Two-Hour Magneto-Priming with Static Magnetic Fields Ranging from 65 ± 3 to 505 ± 8 mT Does Not Improve the Germination Percentage of Industrial Hemp Seed at a Sub-Optimal Germination Temperature
J 2018, 1(1), 192-196; https://doi.org/10.3390/j1010017
Received: 5 October 2018 / Revised: 3 December 2018 / Accepted: 5 December 2018 / Published: 7 December 2018
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Abstract
Industrial hemp is a non-psychoactive variety of Cannabis sativa L., i.e., it contains less than 0.3% tetrahydrocannabinols (THC). This crop is one of historical importance in the U.S. as manufacturers seek industrial hemp as a renewable and sustainable resource for a wide variety [...] Read more.
Industrial hemp is a non-psychoactive variety of Cannabis sativa L., i.e., it contains less than 0.3% tetrahydrocannabinols (THC). This crop is one of historical importance in the U.S. as manufacturers seek industrial hemp as a renewable and sustainable resource for a wide variety of consumer and industrial products. To help farmers succeed, agronomic research on industrial hemp is needed. In this trial, investigations were performed to determine whether magneto-priming, a form of seed priming that involves magnetic fields, effects the germination percentage of industrial hemp seed. Beneficial effects of magnetic fields on seedling growths and germination have been reported for many different plant species. Dry industrial hemp seed was exposed to static magnetic fields ranging from 65 ± 3 to 505 ± 8 mT for 2 h prior to seed germination. Germination was performed at 13.6 ± 0.7 °C, a temperature that is representative of the germination temperatures of industrial hemp in the U.S. state of Colorado. Magneto-priming of seed had no statistically significant effect on seed germination percentage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers for J-Multidisciplinary Scientific Journal)
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