Next Issue
Previous Issue

Table of Contents

Inventions, Volume 3, Issue 1 (March 2018)

  • Issues are regarded as officially published after their release is announced to the table of contents alert mailing list.
  • You may sign up for e-mail alerts to receive table of contents of newly released issues.
  • PDF is the official format for papers published in both, html and pdf forms. To view the papers in pdf format, click on the "PDF Full-text" link, and use the free Adobe Readerexternal link to open them.
View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-19
Export citation of selected articles as:
Open AccessArticle A New Control Strategy for an Electronic Differential System for Urban Electric Vehicles
Received: 11 December 2017 / Revised: 14 March 2018 / Accepted: 16 March 2018 / Published: 19 March 2018
PDF Full-text (3607 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper presents a control strategy that is applied in turning control for decentralized electric vehicles known as the electronic differential system. The conventional mechanical differential has drawbacks, such as bulkiness and slow response. The electric system response is not only ten times
[...] Read more.
This paper presents a control strategy that is applied in turning control for decentralized electric vehicles known as the electronic differential system. The conventional mechanical differential has drawbacks, such as bulkiness and slow response. The electric system response is not only ten times faster than its mechanical counterpart, but its accurate control even reduces the loss of power from the motor to the wheel. Through the turning radius from the steering angle command that the driver gives, the controller can distribute torque to each wheel. After controlling each wheel’s rotation, the vehicle can turn in neutral steering. The results show that this strategy can be effectively employed on urban roads. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Inventions in Vehicular Guidance and Control)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle Carbon Nanotubes Grown Using Solid Polymer Chemical Vapor Deposition in a Fluidized Bed Reactor with Iron(III) Nitrate, Iron(III) Chloride and Nickel(II) Chloride Catalysts
Received: 2 January 2018 / Revised: 22 February 2018 / Accepted: 24 February 2018 / Published: 15 March 2018
PDF Full-text (2147 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this study, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MW-CNT) were successfully synthesized using a chemical vapor deposition-fluidized bed (CVD-FB), with 10% hydrogen and 90% argon by volume, and a reaction temperature between 750 and 850 °C in a specially designed three-stage reactor. A solid state
[...] Read more.
In this study, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MW-CNT) were successfully synthesized using a chemical vapor deposition-fluidized bed (CVD-FB), with 10% hydrogen and 90% argon by volume, and a reaction temperature between 750 and 850 °C in a specially designed three-stage reactor. A solid state of polyethylene (PE) was used as a carbon source and iron(III) nitrate, iron(III) chloride, and nickel(II) chloride were used as catalysts. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectrum analysis were used to analyze and examine the morphology and characteristics of the CNTs. A thermogravimetric analyzer was used to determine the purification temperature for the CNTs. Experimental results showed that the synthesis with iron-based catalysts produced more carbon filaments. Nickel(II) chloride catalysis resulted in the synthesis of symmetrical MW-CNTs with diameters between 30 and 40 nanometers. This catalyst produced the best graphitization level (ID/IG) with a value of 0.89. Excessively large particle size catalysts do not cluster carbon effectively enough to grow CNTs and this is the main reason for the appearance of carbon filaments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selected Papers from ICI2017 and Spintech Thesis Awards)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle A Remote Controlled Robotic Arm That Reads Barcodes and Handles Products
Received: 5 February 2018 / Revised: 23 February 2018 / Accepted: 8 March 2018 / Published: 12 March 2018
PDF Full-text (6391 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this study, a 6-axis robotic arm, which was controlled by an embedded Raspberry Pi with onboard WiFi, was developed and fabricated. A mobile application (APP), designed for the purpose, was used to operate and monitor a robotic arm by means of a
[...] Read more.
In this study, a 6-axis robotic arm, which was controlled by an embedded Raspberry Pi with onboard WiFi, was developed and fabricated. A mobile application (APP), designed for the purpose, was used to operate and monitor a robotic arm by means of a WiFi connection. A computer vision was used to read common one-dimensional barcode (EAN code) for the handling and identification of products such as milk tea drinks, sodas and biscuits. The gripper on the end of the arm could sense the clamping force and allowed real-time control of the amount of force used to hold and handle the products. The packages were all made of different material and this control allowed them to be handled without danger of damage or deformation. The maximum handling torque used was ~1.08 Nm and the mechanical design allowed the force of the gripper to be uniformly applied to the sensor to ensure accurate measurement of the force. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selected Papers from ICI2017 and Spintech Thesis Awards)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Monitoring Quality-of-Life Parameters in Wearable Environments
Received: 9 February 2018 / Revised: 27 February 2018 / Accepted: 5 March 2018 / Published: 11 March 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (2703 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The paper presents a new cross-layer bridge protocol between IEEE 802.15.4, IEEE 11073 and IEEE 802.11 for wearable-enabled health-data aggregation formations. The protocol addresses the new reality as imposed by the recent evolution of sensors and networking in situations where backbone infrastructure is
[...] Read more.
The paper presents a new cross-layer bridge protocol between IEEE 802.15.4, IEEE 11073 and IEEE 802.11 for wearable-enabled health-data aggregation formations. The protocol addresses the new reality as imposed by the recent evolution of sensors and networking in situations where backbone infrastructure is experiencing congestion. We discuss real-life application scenarios of nimble-network formations. The main novelty of the proposed algorithm is that it defines presence as a new way of routing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Frontiers in Wearable Devices)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle Experimental Investigation on the Effect of Size and Pitch of Hydrophobic Square Patterns on the Pool Boiling Heat Transfer Performance of Cylindrical Copper Surface
Received: 2 February 2018 / Revised: 6 March 2018 / Accepted: 6 March 2018 / Published: 8 March 2018
PDF Full-text (6955 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
In this work, pool boiling heat transfer tests were conducted for investigating the effects of the size and pitch of the hydrophobic square patterns on a copper test piece with the following dimensions: 40 mm long, 25 mm outer diameter, and 18 mm
[...] Read more.
In this work, pool boiling heat transfer tests were conducted for investigating the effects of the size and pitch of the hydrophobic square patterns on a copper test piece with the following dimensions: 40 mm long, 25 mm outer diameter, and 18 mm inner diameter. The size of the square patterns and the pitch were varied with an increment of 0.5 mm from 1 mm to 3 mm and from 4.5 to 5.5 mm, respectively. Among the various square patterns of different size and pitch, the 2 mm size square pattern with 5 mm pitch (inter-distance 3 mm) was found to be the best because it gives the advantage of bubble coalescence behavior and also the rewetting phenomenon. The observed bubble departure diameter was 2.35 mm, and using this diameter, we predicted the maximum inter-distance between the patterns for producing inter coalescence of bubbles in the axial direction was 3.12 mm. Therefore, a side-by-side distance of 3 mm, which was closed to the estimated inter-distance graphically, can avoid the earlier inter coalescence of the bubbles between patterns on the surface in the axial direction. This results in better pool boiling heat transfer performance. Highlights: (1) Heterogeneous wettable structures were obtained on the copper surface using screen printing techniques; (2) The effect of the size and pitch of the hydrophobic patterns on the bubble dynamics was determined; (3) The wall superheats of all the heterogeneous wettable surfaces were less than the plain copper surface; (4) The highest heat transfer coefficient was obtained from the hydrophobic pattern with 2 mm size and 5 mm pitch. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Heat Transfer and Its Innovative Applications)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle Wearable E-Textile Technologies: A Review on Sensors, Actuators and Control Elements
Received: 26 December 2017 / Revised: 25 February 2018 / Accepted: 2 March 2018 / Published: 6 March 2018
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (1151 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Wearable e-textiles are able to perform electronic functions and are perceived as a way to add features into common wearable textiles, building competitive market advantages. The e-textile production has become not only a research effort but also an industrial production challenge. It is
[...] Read more.
Wearable e-textiles are able to perform electronic functions and are perceived as a way to add features into common wearable textiles, building competitive market advantages. The e-textile production has become not only a research effort but also an industrial production challenge. It is important to know how to use existing industrial processes or to develop new ones that are able to scale up production, ensuring the behavior and performance of prototypes. Despite the technical challenges, there are already some examples of wearable e-textiles where sensors, actuators, and production techniques were used to seamlessly embed electronic features into traditional wearable textiles, which allow for daily use without a bionic stigma. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Frontiers in Wearable Devices)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Frequency Transient Suppression in Hybrid Electric Ship Power Systems: A Model Predictive Control Strategy for Converter Control with Energy Storage
Received: 26 December 2017 / Revised: 20 February 2018 / Accepted: 27 February 2018 / Published: 1 March 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1573 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper aims to understand how the common phenomenon of fluctuations in propulsion and service load demand contribute to frequency transients in hybrid electric ship power systems. These fluctuations arise mainly due to changes in sea conditions resulting in significant variations in the
[...] Read more.
This paper aims to understand how the common phenomenon of fluctuations in propulsion and service load demand contribute to frequency transients in hybrid electric ship power systems. These fluctuations arise mainly due to changes in sea conditions resulting in significant variations in the propulsion load demand of ships. This leads to poor power quality for the power system that can potentially cause hazardous conditions such as blackout on board the ship. Effects of these fluctuations are analysed using a hybrid electric ship power system model and a proposed Model Predictive Control (MPC) strategy to prevent propagation of transients from the propellers into the shipboard power system. A battery energy storage system, which is directly connected to the DC-link of the frequency converter, is used as the smoothing element. Case studies that involve propulsion and service load changes have been carried out to investigate the efficacy of the proposed solution. Simulation results show that the proposed solution with energy storage and MPC is able to contain frequency transients in the shipboard power system within the permissible levels stipulated by the relevant power quality standards. These findings will help ship builders and operators to consider using battery energy storage systems controlled by advanced control techniques such as MPC to improve the power quality on board ships. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Frequency-Domain Joint Motion and Disparity Estimation Using Steerable Filters
Received: 28 November 2017 / Revised: 31 January 2018 / Accepted: 3 February 2018 / Published: 6 February 2018
PDF Full-text (8711 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this paper, the problem of joint disparity and motion estimation from stereo image sequences is formulated in the spatiotemporal frequency domain, and a novel steerable filter-based approach is proposed. Our rationale behind coupling the two problems is that according to experimental evidence
[...] Read more.
In this paper, the problem of joint disparity and motion estimation from stereo image sequences is formulated in the spatiotemporal frequency domain, and a novel steerable filter-based approach is proposed. Our rationale behind coupling the two problems is that according to experimental evidence in the literature, the biological visual mechanisms for depth and motion are not independent of each other. Furthermore, our motivation to study the problem in the frequency domain and search for a filter-based solution is based on the fact that, according to early experimental studies, the biological visual mechanisms can be modelled based on frequency-domain or filter-based considerations, for both the perception of depth and the perception of motion. The proposed framework constitutes the first attempt to solve the joint estimation problem through a filter-based solution, based on frequency-domain considerations. Thus, the presented ideas provide a new direction of work and could be the basis for further developments. From an algorithmic point of view, we additionally extend state-of-the-art ideas from the disparity estimation literature to handle the joint disparity-motion estimation problem and formulate an algorithm that is evaluated through a number of experimental results. Comparisons with state-of-the-art-methods demonstrate the accuracy of the proposed approach. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovation in Machine Intelligence for Critical Infrastructures)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessTechnical Note A Simple Setup to Perform 3D Locomotion Tracking in Zebrafish by Using a Single Camera
Received: 6 January 2018 / Revised: 28 January 2018 / Accepted: 31 January 2018 / Published: 2 February 2018
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (3024 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Generally, the measurement of three-dimensional (3D) swimming behavior in zebrafish relies on commercial software or requires sophisticated scripts, and depends on more than two cameras to capture the video. Here, we establish a simple and economic apparatus to detect 3D locomotion in zebrafish,
[...] Read more.
Generally, the measurement of three-dimensional (3D) swimming behavior in zebrafish relies on commercial software or requires sophisticated scripts, and depends on more than two cameras to capture the video. Here, we establish a simple and economic apparatus to detect 3D locomotion in zebrafish, which involves a single camera capture system that records zebrafish movement in a specially designed water tank with a mirror tilted at 45 degrees. The recorded videos are analyzed using idTracker, while spatial positions are calibrated by ImageJ software and 3D trajectories are plotted by Origin 9.1 software. This easy setting allowed scientists to track 3D swimming behavior of multiple zebrafish with low cost and precise spatial position, showing great potential for fish behavioral research in the future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Inventions and innovation in Biotechnology and Materials)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessEditorial Advances in the Mechanical Design of Robots
Received: 18 January 2018 / Revised: 28 January 2018 / Accepted: 28 January 2018 / Published: 30 January 2018
PDF Full-text (131 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Robots are mechatronic systems whose functionalities and tasks are mechanical actions and interactions either with humans or with other systems[...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Mechanism Design for Robots)
Open AccessArticle Evaluation of Capacitive Markers Fabricated by 3D Printing, Laser Cutting and Prototyping
Received: 8 December 2017 / Revised: 12 January 2018 / Accepted: 15 January 2018 / Published: 26 January 2018
PDF Full-text (6434 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
With Tangible User Interfaces, the computer user is able to interact in a fundamentally different and more intuitive way than with usual 2D displays. By grasping real physical objects, information can also be conveyed haptically, i.e., the user not only sees information on
[...] Read more.
With Tangible User Interfaces, the computer user is able to interact in a fundamentally different and more intuitive way than with usual 2D displays. By grasping real physical objects, information can also be conveyed haptically, i.e., the user not only sees information on a 2D display, but can also grasp physical representations. To recognize such objects (“tangibles”) it is skillful to use capacitive sensing, as it happens in most touch screens. Thus, real objects can be located and identified by the touch screen display automatically. Recent work already addressed such capacitive markers, but focused on their coding scheme and automated fabrication by 3D printing. This paper goes beyond the fabrication by 3D printers and, for the first time, applies the concept of capacitive codes to laser cutting and another immediate prototyping approach using modeling clay. Beside the evaluation of additional properties, we adapt recent research results regarding the optimized detection of tangible objects on capacitive screens. As a result of our comprehensive study, the detection performance is affected by the type of capacitive signal processing (respectively the device) and the geometry of the marker. 3D printing revealed to be the most reliable technique, though laser cutting and immediate prototyping of markers showed promising results. Based on our findings, we discuss individual strengths of each capacitive marker type. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovations in 3-D Printing)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle Inexpensive Piezoelectric Elements for Nozzle Contact Detection and Build Platform Leveling in FFF 3D Printers
Received: 25 November 2017 / Revised: 11 January 2018 / Accepted: 21 January 2018 / Published: 25 January 2018
PDF Full-text (1174 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Inexpensive piezoelectric diaphragms can be used as sensors to facilitate both nozzle height setting and build platform leveling in Fused Filament Fabrication (FFF) 3D printers. Tests simulating nozzle contact are conducted to establish the available output and an output of greater than 8
[...] Read more.
Inexpensive piezoelectric diaphragms can be used as sensors to facilitate both nozzle height setting and build platform leveling in Fused Filament Fabrication (FFF) 3D printers. Tests simulating nozzle contact are conducted to establish the available output and an output of greater than 8 Volts found at 20 °C, a value which is readily detectable by simple electronic circuits. Tests are also conducted at a temperature of 80 °C and, despite a reduction of greater than 80% in output voltage, this is still detectable. The reliability of piezoelectric diaphragms is investigated by mechanically stressing samples over 100,000 cycles at both 20 and 80 °C, and little loss of output over the test duration is found. The development of a nozzle contact sensor using a single piezoelectric diaphragm is described. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovations in 3-D Printing)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessEditorial A New Article Type: Patent Summary
Received: 23 January 2018 / Revised: 23 January 2018 / Accepted: 23 January 2018 / Published: 25 January 2018
PDF Full-text (115 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
We are pleased to announce a new article type, “Patent Summary”, for Inventions.[...] Full article
Open AccessEditorial Acknowledgement to Reviewers of Inventions in 2017
Received: 17 January 2018 / Revised: 17 January 2018 / Accepted: 17 January 2018 / Published: 17 January 2018
PDF Full-text (197 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Peer review is an essential part in the publication process, ensuring that Inventions maintains high quality standards for its published papers [...]
Full article
Open AccessArticle Numerical Analysis of CNC Milling Chatter Using Embedded Miniature MEMS Microphone Array System
Received: 22 November 2017 / Revised: 11 January 2018 / Accepted: 12 January 2018 / Published: 16 January 2018
PDF Full-text (6042 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
With the increasingly common use of industrial automation for mass production, there are many computer numerical control (CNC) machine tools that require the collection of data from intelligent sensors in order to analyze their processing quality. In general, for high speed rotating machines,
[...] Read more.
With the increasingly common use of industrial automation for mass production, there are many computer numerical control (CNC) machine tools that require the collection of data from intelligent sensors in order to analyze their processing quality. In general, for high speed rotating machines, an accelerometer can be attached on the spindle to collect the data from the detected vibration of the CNC. However, due to their cost, accelerometers have not been widely adopted for use with typical CNC machine tools. This study sought to develop an embedded miniature MEMS microphone array system (Radius 5.25 cm, 8 channels) to discover the vibration source of the CNC from spatial phase array processing. The proposed method utilizes voice activity detection (VAD) to distinguish between the presence and absence of abnormal noise in the pre-stage, and utilizes the traditional direction of arrival method (DOA) via multiple signal classification (MUSIC) to isolate the spatial orientation of the noise source in post-processing. In the numerical simulation, the non-interfering noise source location is calibrated in the anechoic chamber, and is tested with real milling processing in the milling machine. As this results in a high background noise level, the vibration sound source is more accurate in the presented energy gradation graphs as compared to the traditional MUSIC method. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selected Papers from ICI2017 and Spintech Thesis Awards)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle A Reconfigurable Gripper for Dexterous Manipulation in Flexible Assembly
Received: 9 November 2017 / Revised: 31 December 2017 / Accepted: 5 January 2018 / Published: 10 January 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (6175 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this paper, a high-speed multi-fingered reconfigurable gripper is presented. The aim is to create a robotic end effector that is capable of handling parts of different geometries and weight. It consists of three fingers, accounting for a total of eight Degrees of
[...] Read more.
In this paper, a high-speed multi-fingered reconfigurable gripper is presented. The aim is to create a robotic end effector that is capable of handling parts of different geometries and weight. It consists of three fingers, accounting for a total of eight Degrees of Freedom (DoFs). The paper discusses the design, control, and reconfiguration aspects of the gripper, and demonstrates its applicability to different manipulation tasks. The gripper has the ability of high-force movement and its high number of DoFs enables it to grasp a large variety of geometries, while retaining the design simplicity. The preliminary grasping experiments highlight its potential in robotic handling applications in both research and production environments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Inventions and innovation in Advanced Manufacturing)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle Navigation of an Autonomous Wheeled Robot in Unknown Environments Based on Evolutionary Fuzzy Control
Received: 21 November 2017 / Revised: 1 January 2018 / Accepted: 2 January 2018 / Published: 5 January 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (5890 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Navigation of a wheeled robot in unknown environments is proposed in this paper. The approach may be applied to navigating an autonomous vehicle in unknown environments, such as parking lots. The navigation consists of three parts: obstacle avoidance behavior, target seeking behavior, and
[...] Read more.
Navigation of a wheeled robot in unknown environments is proposed in this paper. The approach may be applied to navigating an autonomous vehicle in unknown environments, such as parking lots. The navigation consists of three parts: obstacle avoidance behavior, target seeking behavior, and a behavior supervisor. The obstacle avoidance behavior is achieved by controlling the robot to move along an obstacle boundary through evolutionary fuzzy control. In the evolutionary fuzzy control approach, a Pareto set of fuzzy controllers (FCs) is found though a multi-objective continuous ant colony optimization algorithm. Target seeking behavior is achieved by controlling the robot through hybrid proportional–integral–derivative (PID) controllers. The behavior supervisor determines the switching between obstacle avoidance and target seeking behaviors, where the dead-cycle problem is considered. Simulations and experiments were performed to verify the effectiveness of the proposed navigation scheme. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Inventions in Vehicular Guidance and Control)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle Contact-Free Support Structures for Part Overhangs in Powder-Bed Metal Additive Manufacturing
Received: 27 November 2017 / Revised: 24 December 2017 / Accepted: 26 December 2017 / Published: 28 December 2017
PDF Full-text (13007 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This study investigates the feasibility of a novel concept, contact-free support structures, for part overhangs in powder-bed metal additive manufacturing. The intent is to develop alternative support designs that require no or little post-processing, and yet, maintain effectiveness in minimizing overhang distortions. The
[...] Read more.
This study investigates the feasibility of a novel concept, contact-free support structures, for part overhangs in powder-bed metal additive manufacturing. The intent is to develop alternative support designs that require no or little post-processing, and yet, maintain effectiveness in minimizing overhang distortions. The idea is to build, simultaneously during part fabrications, a heat sink (called “heat support”), underneath an overhang to alter adverse thermal behaviors. Thermomechanical modeling and simulations using finite element analysis were applied to numerically research the heat support effect on overhang distortions. Experimentally, a powder-bed electron beam additive manufacturing system was utilized to fabricate heat support designs and examine their functions. The results prove the concept and demonstrate the effectiveness of contact-free heat supports. Moreover, the method was tested with different heat support parameters and applied to various overhang geometries. It is concluded that the heat support proposed has the potential to be implemented in industrial applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovations in 3-D Printing)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle The Use of 3D Printing in the Fabrication of Nasal Stents
Received: 17 November 2017 / Revised: 19 December 2017 / Accepted: 19 December 2017 / Published: 23 December 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (9951 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Nasoalveolar molding of the cleft lip, nose, and alveolar palate has been a successful strategy for the restoration of oronasal function and appearance, but it has some drawbacks. The temporary implant that is inserted before surgical reconstruction is a large appliance requiring numerous
[...] Read more.
Nasoalveolar molding of the cleft lip, nose, and alveolar palate has been a successful strategy for the restoration of oronasal function and appearance, but it has some drawbacks. The temporary implant that is inserted before surgical reconstruction is a large appliance requiring numerous adjustments, it can irritate delicate soft tissues, and interfere with the infant’s ability to nurse or feed. In the early post-operative period and for months after cleft lip repair, patients wear standardized silicone stents that come in multiple sizes, but require significant sculpting to fit the unique cleft deformity. Three-dimensional (3D) printing offers the potential of highly personalized and patient-specific treatment. We developed a method that produces a customized 3D printed stent that matches the contours and unique features of each patient and permits modification and adjustments in size and shape as the patient ages. With 3D scanning technology, the device can be designed at the first visit to create an appliance that can be worn sequentially with minimal trauma, does not impede feeding, and a prosthesis that will improve compliance. The device will be worn intraorally to help shape the alveolus, lip, and nose before surgical repair. Furthermore, the stent can be doped with drugs as each patient’s case warrants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovations in 3-D Printing)
Figures

Figure 1

Back to Top