Previous Issue
Volume 6, September

Table of Contents

Beverages, Volume 6, Issue 4 (December 2020) – 4 articles

  • Issues are regarded as officially published after their release is announced to the table of contents alert mailing list.
  • You may sign up for e-mail alerts to receive table of contents of newly released issues.
  • PDF is the official format for papers published in both, html and pdf forms. To view the papers in pdf format, click on the "PDF Full-text" link, and use the free Adobe Readerexternal link to open them.
Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:
Open AccessArticle
Sensory Analysis of Post-Exercise Coffee or Cocoa Milk Beverages for Endurance Athletes
Beverages 2020, 6(4), 61; https://doi.org/10.3390/beverages6040061 - 20 Oct 2020
Viewed by 104
Abstract
Beverage strategies with balanced carbohydrate and protein supply are important for athletes’ recovery. Cow’s milk with added bioactive compounds present in coffee and cocoa facilitates glucose metabolism and may help post-workout glycogen recovery. Home-prepared beverages are cost and nutritionally effective strategies. Thus, the [...] Read more.
Beverage strategies with balanced carbohydrate and protein supply are important for athletes’ recovery. Cow’s milk with added bioactive compounds present in coffee and cocoa facilitates glucose metabolism and may help post-workout glycogen recovery. Home-prepared beverages are cost and nutritionally effective strategies. Thus, the objectives were: (1) To develop home-prepared beverages containing nonfat powdered milk and sugar combined with filtered coffee or cocoa powder in balanced amounts for recovery after endurance exercise; and (2) to perform sensory analysis. Sensory evaluation was conducted by an acceptance test, applying nine-point hedonic scale and descriptive analysis, using the check-all-that-apply method (CATA). McNemar’s test and logistic regression with the proportional odds model were employed. The sample included 44 triathletes and 56 runners, of both sexes, 31–70 years old. Both beverages were well accepted by runners and triathletes, with higher acceptance of the coffee beverage (odds ratio coffee vs cocoa 5.232, p=0.0038). There was no significant difference between acceptance of triathletes and runners for the two beverages. The descriptive sensory analysis (CATA) resulted in slightly different characterizations between the two beverages. Both beverages were well accepted and characterized by the athletes, who can supply different options of post-workout beverages according to individual tastes, composition, and characteristics. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
A Multi-Parameter, Predictive Model of Starch Hydrolysis in Barley Beer Mashes
Beverages 2020, 6(4), 60; https://doi.org/10.3390/beverages6040060 - 13 Oct 2020
Viewed by 264
Abstract
A key first step in the production of beer is the mashing process, which enables the solubilization and subsequent enzymatic conversion of starch to fermentable sugars. Mashing performance depends primarily on temperature, but also on a variety of other process parameters, including pH [...] Read more.
A key first step in the production of beer is the mashing process, which enables the solubilization and subsequent enzymatic conversion of starch to fermentable sugars. Mashing performance depends primarily on temperature, but also on a variety of other process parameters, including pH and mash thickness (known as the “liquor-to-grist” ratio). This process has been studied for well over 100 years, and yet essentially all predictive modeling efforts are alike in that only the impact of temperature is considered, while the impacts of all other process parameters are largely ignored. A set of statistical and mathematical methods collectively known as Response Surface Methodology (RSM) is commonly applied to develop predictive models of complex processes such as mashing, where performance depends on multiple parameters. For this study, RSM was used to design and test a set of experimental mash conditions to quantify the impact of four process parameters—temperature (isothermal), pH, aeration, and the liquor-to-grist ratio—on extract yield (total and fermentable) and extract composition in order to create a robust, yet simple, predictive model. In contrast to previous models of starch hydrolysis in a mash, a unique aspect of the model developed here was the quantification of significant parameter interaction effects, the most notable of which was the interaction between temperature and mash thickness (i.e., the liquor-to-grist ratio). This interaction had a sizeable impact on important mash performance metrics, such as the total extract yield and the fermentability of the resultant wort. The development of this model is of great future utility to brewery processing, as it permits the multi-parameter optimization of the mashing process. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Beer Quality and Flavour)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Effect of 1-Methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) and Storage Atmosphere on the Volatile Aroma Composition of Cloudy and Clear Apple Juices
Beverages 2020, 6(4), 59; https://doi.org/10.3390/beverages6040059 - 30 Sep 2020
Viewed by 258
Abstract
The effects of 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP), storage atmosphere (controlled (CA) or regular (RA)), and juice processing (clear or cloudy) on the volatile aroma compounds from McIntosh and Honeycrisp apples following 4-month storage were studied. All the major esters, aldehydes, and total volatile content from [...] Read more.
The effects of 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP), storage atmosphere (controlled (CA) or regular (RA)), and juice processing (clear or cloudy) on the volatile aroma compounds from McIntosh and Honeycrisp apples following 4-month storage were studied. All the major esters, aldehydes, and total volatile content from McIntosh juice were significantly affected by the two-way interaction between harvest maturity and 1-MCP treatment (p ≤ 0.01), as well as harvest maturity and storage atmosphere (p ≤ 0.001). In McIntosh juices, a remarkable reduction of all types of esters, aldehydes, most alcohols, and total volatile compounds was found when juices were prepared from 1-MCP-treated apples. In Honeycrisp, significant differences in the level of esters and the total volatile aroma was caused by storage atmosphere and juice processing techniques (p ≤ 0.001), but not by 1-MCP treatment. As compared to clear juices, cloudy juice samples from Honeycrisp had a considerably higher content of total volatiles, esters, and aldehydes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fruit Juices: Technology, Chemistry, and Nutrition 2.0)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Brewing Characteristics of the Maltotriose-Positive Yeast Zygotorulaspora florentina Isolated from Oak
Beverages 2020, 6(4), 58; https://doi.org/10.3390/beverages6040058 - 24 Sep 2020
Viewed by 417
Abstract
The use of wild yeasts in fermentation is becoming a viable option for the differentiation of beers. To achieve good fermentation rates and alcohol yields, however, such yeasts must have the ability to utilize the wort sugars maltose and maltotriose, a relatively rare [...] Read more.
The use of wild yeasts in fermentation is becoming a viable option for the differentiation of beers. To achieve good fermentation rates and alcohol yields, however, such yeasts must have the ability to utilize the wort sugars maltose and maltotriose, a relatively rare trait amongst non-domesticated yeasts. Zygotorulaspora florentina is a species with the ability to utilize both sugars, and was evaluated here with respect to its brewing potential. The strain studied (VTT C-201041) was isolated from bark of an oak tree (Quercus robur) in Espoo, Finland. The fermentation performance of the strain was compared to that of two ale yeasts as well as the species type strain (VTT C-94199). Both Z. florentina strains fermented wort efficiently (apparent attenuation levels >77%). While the type strain had the highest yield, the Finnish strain produced more volatile aroma compounds. The species is capable of decarboxylating ferulic acid to produce the spice/clove-like compound 4-vinylguaiacol, which was present in beers at a concentration above the typical flavor threshold. The characteristic flavor of 4-vinylguaiacol was not however perceptible in taste trials, possibly due to the masking effect of other compounds. The potential of this species for industrial application is discussed, particularly in relation to its apparent ethanol sensitivity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Beer Quality and Flavour)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Previous Issue
Back to TopTop