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Article

“Vaccine Passports” May Backfire: Findings from a Cross-Sectional Study in the UK and Israel on Willingness to Get Vaccinated against COVID-19

1
Dyson School of Design Engineering, Imperial College London, London SW7 2DB, UK
2
Department of Primary Care and Public Health, Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Brighton BN1 9PH, UK
3
The Faculty of Industrial Engineering & Management, Technion Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 3200003, Israel
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Efrat Neter and Karen Morgan
Vaccines 2021, 9(8), 902; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines9080902
Received: 6 July 2021 / Revised: 9 August 2021 / Accepted: 12 August 2021 / Published: 14 August 2021
Domestic “vaccine passports” are being implemented across the world as a way of increasing vaccinated people’s freedom of movement and to encourage vaccination. However, these vaccine passports may affect people’s vaccination decisions in unintended and undesirable ways. This cross-sectional study investigated whether people’s willingness and motivation to get vaccinated relate to their psychological needs (autonomy, competence and relatedness), and how vaccine passports might affect these needs. Across two countries and 1358 participants, we found that need frustration—particularly autonomy frustration—was associated with lower willingness to get vaccinated and with a shift from self-determined to external motivation. In Israel (a country with vaccine passports), people reported greater autonomy frustration than in the UK (a country without vaccine passports). Our findings suggest that control measures, such as domestic vaccine passports, may have detrimental effects on people’s autonomy, motivation, and willingness to get vaccinated. Policies should strive to achieve a highly vaccinated population by supporting individuals’ autonomous motivation to get vaccinated and using messages of autonomy and relatedness, rather than applying pressure and external controls. View Full-Text
Keywords: COVID-19; public health; self-determination theory; vaccine passports; vaccination COVID-19; public health; self-determination theory; vaccine passports; vaccination
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MDPI and ACS Style

Porat, T.; Burnell, R.; Calvo, R.A.; Ford, E.; Paudyal, P.; Baxter, W.L.; Parush, A. “Vaccine Passports” May Backfire: Findings from a Cross-Sectional Study in the UK and Israel on Willingness to Get Vaccinated against COVID-19. Vaccines 2021, 9, 902. https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines9080902

AMA Style

Porat T, Burnell R, Calvo RA, Ford E, Paudyal P, Baxter WL, Parush A. “Vaccine Passports” May Backfire: Findings from a Cross-Sectional Study in the UK and Israel on Willingness to Get Vaccinated against COVID-19. Vaccines. 2021; 9(8):902. https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines9080902

Chicago/Turabian Style

Porat, Talya, Ryan Burnell, Rafael A. Calvo, Elizabeth Ford, Priya Paudyal, Weston L. Baxter, and Avi Parush. 2021. "“Vaccine Passports” May Backfire: Findings from a Cross-Sectional Study in the UK and Israel on Willingness to Get Vaccinated against COVID-19" Vaccines 9, no. 8: 902. https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines9080902

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