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Adm. Sci., Volume 14, Issue 5 (May 2024) – 23 articles

Cover Story (view full-size image): This issue features a study that explores the entrepreneurial intentions and challenges faced by business students in the post-pandemic environment. Through qualitative interviews with students from a Midwestern university, this research illuminates how economic shifts and educational experiences shape students' perspectives on entrepreneurship. The findings offer valuable insights into the aspirations and barriers that prospective entrepreneurs encounter, highlighting the need for educational programs that enhance practical skills and psychological resilience. View this paper
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14 pages, 1626 KiB  
Article
Drivers for Clustering and Inter-Project Collaboration—A Case of Horizon Europe Projects
by Takwa Benissa and Anish Patil
Adm. Sci. 2024, 14(5), 104; https://doi.org/10.3390/admsci14050104 - 17 May 2024
Viewed by 462
Abstract
This paper investigates the drivers and dynamics of clustering and inter-project collaboration within the framework of the Horizon Europe and Horizon 2020 projects. Leveraging a survey-based approach, we examine key themes surrounding the perception of clustering, the willingness to share information under legal [...] Read more.
This paper investigates the drivers and dynamics of clustering and inter-project collaboration within the framework of the Horizon Europe and Horizon 2020 projects. Leveraging a survey-based approach, we examine key themes surrounding the perception of clustering, the willingness to share information under legal confidentiality, and motivations for engaging with partners from different projects. The survey instrument, implemented via Microsoft Forms, was distributed among the consortia of eight EU projects participating in the SOLID4B cluster. Notably, the questionnaire was meticulously crafted based on an in-depth analysis of the SOLID4B case and comprehensive discussions with project coordinators and communication and dissemination managers from all participating projects. These discussions aimed to establish a clear roadmap for the cluster, ensuring the questionnaire’s relevance and usefulness for all participants. Data analysis was conducted within the same platform, facilitating efficient data processing and visualization. Our findings reveal that a significant majority of respondents (48 out of 55) perceive clustering as a valuable asset, indicative of a positive shift in perspectives. Challenges related to confidentiality were addressed through nuanced insights, with respondents demonstrating a willingness to share routine best practices, significant breakthroughs, and deliverables within a legally protected framework. Furthermore, a robust majority (40 out of 55) expressed a keen interest in collaborative endeavors, underscoring a collective drive to extend activities beyond individual project boundaries. The study highlights the importance of clustering with other projects in maximizing the impact of the Horizon program, extending stakeholder networks, and sharing knowledge and achievements in research and innovation. These insights contribute to a deeper understanding of the motivations and challenges surrounding clustering and collaboration within the Horizon Europe and Horizon 2020 projects. Ultimately, the findings pave the way for informed strategies aimed at fostering a dynamic and interconnected research community. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Collaboration Networks, Organizations, and Innovation)
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13 pages, 273 KiB  
Article
The Gender Pay Gap in Academia: Evidence from the Beedie School of Business
by Irene M. Gordon, Karel Hrazdil and Stephen Spector
Adm. Sci. 2024, 14(5), 103; https://doi.org/10.3390/admsci14050103 - 17 May 2024
Viewed by 419
Abstract
We analyzed gender pay gap in academia using detailed performance data of all faculty members at the Beedie School of Business, Simon Fraser University, during 2012–2022. Although we initially observed a small average pay gap in favor of male academics, we found that [...] Read more.
We analyzed gender pay gap in academia using detailed performance data of all faculty members at the Beedie School of Business, Simon Fraser University, during 2012–2022. Although we initially observed a small average pay gap in favor of male academics, we found that female academics received higher remuneration compared to their male counterparts, once we controlled for research and teaching productivity, prior education and work experience, ethnicity, and various academic appointments. Our results provide an insight into possible sources of gender bias and highlight the need to control for teaching and research performance when investigating gender pay gaps. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Gender, Race and Diversity in Organizations)
16 pages, 280 KiB  
Article
Navigating Autonomy, Competence, and Relatedness: Insights from Middle Managers in Norway
by Kristin Severinsen Spieler
Adm. Sci. 2024, 14(5), 102; https://doi.org/10.3390/admsci14050102 - 17 May 2024
Viewed by 657
Abstract
Middle managers play a pivotal role in bridging the gap between senior leadership and employees, often navigating competing demands and pressures. This study investigates experiences of autonomy, competence, and relatedness among middle managers serving as department heads in the University and University College [...] Read more.
Middle managers play a pivotal role in bridging the gap between senior leadership and employees, often navigating competing demands and pressures. This study investigates experiences of autonomy, competence, and relatedness among middle managers serving as department heads in the University and University College (UUC) sector in Norway. The study adopts a qualitative approach in the form of semi-structured interviews with six participants. The findings underscore the significance of autonomy, trust, and support in facilitating the effective execution of middle managers’ roles as executive and inclusive leaders. Autonomy emerges as crucial, which aligns with the principles of the Nordic work–life model. Furthermore, the study highlights the importance of internal motivation and the support provided by the immediate leadership in enhancing middle managers’ performance. Personal competence in one’s subject areas and relatedness emerge as key factors ensuring employee confidence and fostering a positive work environment. The implications of these findings suggest that nurturing autonomy, competence, and relatedness may mitigate the perceived stress associated with being a middle manager in the UUC sector. By addressing these fundamental needs, organisations can potentially enhance the well-being and effectiveness of middle managers, ultimately contributing to organisational success. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Leadership)
17 pages, 258 KiB  
Article
Entrepreneurial Aspirations and Challenges among Business Students: A Qualitative Study
by Anas Al-Fattal
Adm. Sci. 2024, 14(5), 101; https://doi.org/10.3390/admsci14050101 - 16 May 2024
Viewed by 497
Abstract
The COVID-19 pandemic has had a profound impact on small businesses, significantly influencing entrepreneurial aspirations and presenting numerous challenges. This calls for additional research into perceptions, intentions, and the challenges faced in this context. This study aims to explore the comprehension of key [...] Read more.
The COVID-19 pandemic has had a profound impact on small businesses, significantly influencing entrepreneurial aspirations and presenting numerous challenges. This calls for additional research into perceptions, intentions, and the challenges faced in this context. This study aims to explore the comprehension of key entrepreneurial concepts among business students in the post-pandemic era. The paper presents an empirical study which employs qualitative in-depth interviews with 34 undergraduate business students from one public university in the Midwest of the United States. The findings reveal a complex view of entrepreneurship that extends beyond traditional business creation, encompassing elements of social innovation and personal fulfillment. Students displayed a generally positive attitude towards entrepreneurship, influenced strongly by their involvement in practical entrepreneurship-related activities and their familial backgrounds. However, they also identified significant barriers, including financial constraints, fear of failure, and a lack of practical experience, which hinder their intentions to pursue entrepreneurial ventures. The study underscores the importance of entrepreneurship education programs incorporating more comprehensive practical experiences, enhancing financial literacy, and providing psychological support to overcome these challenges. These insights contribute to the ongoing discussion on how to effectively support and prepare aspiring entrepreneurs in a changing educational landscape. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Moving from Entrepreneurial Intention to Behavior)
20 pages, 1510 KiB  
Article
Fintech: Evidence of the Urgent Need to Improve Financial Literacy in Portugal
by Mariana Costa, Manuel Au-Yong-Oliveira and Ana Moreira
Adm. Sci. 2024, 14(5), 99; https://doi.org/10.3390/admsci14050099 - 13 May 2024
Viewed by 559
Abstract
Fintech has revolutionized the financial sector, providing a new way of providing banking services. Since Fintech can provide the same services as traditional banks but entirely online, it is a competitor. As a result, consumers’ relationships with banking have inevitably changed, and it [...] Read more.
Fintech has revolutionized the financial sector, providing a new way of providing banking services. Since Fintech can provide the same services as traditional banks but entirely online, it is a competitor. As a result, consumers’ relationships with banking have inevitably changed, and it is therefore relevant to analyze these changes. The main objective of this study is to understand people’s perceptions of Fintech, their level of knowledge about it, and the impact of its emergence on traditional banking. The study sample consisted of 174 participants. A quantitative methodology was used to test the hypotheses formulated. The results show that participants who know about Fintech and perceive it as safe have a greater intention of changing banks. On the other hand, they perceive that supervision and regulation in traditional banks is higher than in Fintech. Among the reasons for becoming a Fintech customer, the most mentioned were lower costs and the fact that they provide greater convenience and ease of use. It will be in Fintech’s interest to continue working with regulators so that the sector makes progress in this area and consumers can recognize greater equality between traditional banks and Fintech in the future. Full article
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13 pages, 260 KiB  
Article
Changes in Attitude toward Intimate Partner Violence in Rapidly Developing Countries: The Case of Indonesia
by Moemi Noda and Akira Ishida
Adm. Sci. 2024, 14(5), 100; https://doi.org/10.3390/admsci14050100 - 13 May 2024
Viewed by 488
Abstract
Male-perpetrated intimate partner violence (IPV) is a severe human rights violation that negatively affects women’s well-being worldwide. Although many studies have examined the factors influencing IPV, few have investigated the changes in attitudes toward IPV during rapid economic growth. Therefore, this study aimed [...] Read more.
Male-perpetrated intimate partner violence (IPV) is a severe human rights violation that negatively affects women’s well-being worldwide. Although many studies have examined the factors influencing IPV, few have investigated the changes in attitudes toward IPV during rapid economic growth. Therefore, this study aimed to clarify changes in attitudes toward husband-on-wife violence by gender, from 2007 to 2017, using individual data from the Indonesia Demographic and Health Surveys. The estimation results revealed that, despite being more accepting of IPV, young women, women living in rural areas other than Java and Bali, and women belonging to lower social classes have significantly increased their negative attitudes toward IPV over the past decade. Although negative attitudes toward IPV have increased significantly among men living in eastern Indonesia, men in their teens, 20s, and 30s and those living in Sumatra have become more accepting of IPV. This suggests that the overall awareness of IPV resistance among men has not increased. The acceptance of IPV is more prevalent among employed women in the middle and lower socioeconomic strata than among their unemployed counterparts. However, the reverse trend has become clearer among women in the upper strata over the past decade. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diversity, Equity & Inclusion and Its Perception in Organization)
28 pages, 3810 KiB  
Systematic Review
Students’ Entrepreneurial Intention and Its Influencing Factors: A Systematic Literature Review
by Panagiota Xanthopoulou and Alexandros Sahinidis
Adm. Sci. 2024, 14(5), 98; https://doi.org/10.3390/admsci14050098 - 9 May 2024
Viewed by 562
Abstract
Many researchers have studied the factors that impact on students’ entrepreneurial intention; however, findings are conflicting. The present study attempts, through an extensive review of the literature, to provide a holistic view and deeper knowledge of the most significant factors that influence university [...] Read more.
Many researchers have studied the factors that impact on students’ entrepreneurial intention; however, findings are conflicting. The present study attempts, through an extensive review of the literature, to provide a holistic view and deeper knowledge of the most significant factors that influence university students’ decisions to be self-employed or to start a business. A systematic review as well as a bibliometric analysis of the literature was implemented, using a three-step literature mapping protocol to search, select, evaluate, and validate the literature by examining and analyzing numerous papers from the scientific community. The process ended up with 677 papers, from which the forty-three most cited were used as our research sample. Findings revealed that there are four primary categories of factors: the contextual factors, such as the economic, social, and political environment, the motivational factors, such as individuals’ personal needs, personality traits, and characteristics, and the factors related with the personal background of individuals such as family, education, and peers. We also examined the countries with the maximum number of papers on university students’ entrepreneurial intentions. These findings can be useful for policy makers and educators and will serve as a basis for future research, while they also contribute to the literature by highlighting the factors that most affect the entrepreneurial intention of university students. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Moving from Entrepreneurial Intention to Behavior)
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23 pages, 607 KiB  
Article
The Mediating Effect of Affective Commitment on the Relationship between Competence Development and Turnover Intentions: Does This Relationship Depend on the Employee’s Generation?
by Ana Moreira, Carla Tomás and Armanda Antunes
Adm. Sci. 2024, 14(5), 97; https://doi.org/10.3390/admsci14050097 - 8 May 2024
Viewed by 610
Abstract
The main objective of this investigation was to study the effect of organizational competency development practices on turnover intentions and whether affective commitment explains this relationship. Another of the study’s objectives was to test whether these relationships vary according to the generation to [...] Read more.
The main objective of this investigation was to study the effect of organizational competency development practices on turnover intentions and whether affective commitment explains this relationship. Another of the study’s objectives was to test whether these relationships vary according to the generation to which the participant belongs. The study sample consisted of 2123 participants working in Portuguese organizations. The results indicate that organizational competency development practices (training, individualized support, and functional rotation) negatively and significantly affect turnover intentions and that affective commitment mediates this relationship. However, these relationships vary according to the participant’s generation. For Generation Y and Generation X, this mediating effect is found in all dimensions of organizational competency development practices. For the baby boomer generation, there is only a mediating effect of affective commitment in the relationship between individualized support and turnover intentions. These results indicate that human resources should consider the generation to which the participant belongs when implementing competency development practices. Full article
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19 pages, 326 KiB  
Article
How Managerial Practices Impact Perceived Organizational Effectiveness: A Study of Corporate Foundations
by Theresa Gehringer
Adm. Sci. 2024, 14(5), 96; https://doi.org/10.3390/admsci14050096 - 7 May 2024
Viewed by 656
Abstract
The organizational effectiveness of nonprofit organizations (NPOs) has received considerable attention from the scientific research community and society. Nonprofit scholars call for more empirical research that tests existing theories and develops multidimensional frameworks at the organizational level, with a focus on actual management [...] Read more.
The organizational effectiveness of nonprofit organizations (NPOs) has received considerable attention from the scientific research community and society. Nonprofit scholars call for more empirical research that tests existing theories and develops multidimensional frameworks at the organizational level, with a focus on actual management practices. Previous studies have suggested that a broad set of management practices at the program and organizational levels have positive implications for the perceived effectiveness of NPOs. This study evaluates and refines a conceptual model of the antecedents of organizational effectiveness and validates its applicability in the context of charitable foundations established by corporations. Based on survey data from their executive leaders, this study’s empirical findings suggest that perceived organizational effectiveness is less affected by a broad set of management practices and is driven by a few selected best practices that focus on specific stakeholder groups (i.e., experts). Moreover, the results show that certain organizational characteristics, such as organizational experience, can strengthen the perceived effectiveness of charitable foundations. Overall, the results of this study may help nonprofit executive leaders to better understand that a careful selection and implementation of specific practices might be more beneficial for an organization’s effectiveness than an extensive list of practices. Moreover, this study contributes on a broader theoretical level to the study of multidimensional frameworks as a suitable measure for identifying key antecedents of leader-perceived organizational effectiveness across different types of NPOs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Strategic Management)
21 pages, 327 KiB  
Article
The Role of Expectation Management in Value Creation: A Case Study on Municipal Managers’ Experiences with Offering Supported Housing
by Kim Ulvin, Laila Tingvold, Karina Aase and Siv Fladsrud Magnussen
Adm. Sci. 2024, 14(5), 95; https://doi.org/10.3390/admsci14050095 - 6 May 2024
Viewed by 552
Abstract
Theoretically rooted in public service logic (PSL), this article explores managers’ experiences constructing value propositions and facilitating the value creation process in a public sector environment. It reports on a qualitative study from a Norwegian municipal setting based on individual and focus group [...] Read more.
Theoretically rooted in public service logic (PSL), this article explores managers’ experiences constructing value propositions and facilitating the value creation process in a public sector environment. It reports on a qualitative study from a Norwegian municipal setting based on individual and focus group interviews supported by participant observations and relevant documents. The data were analyzed according to the guidelines of stepwise-deductive inductive analysis (SDI). The findings substantiate changes in the utilized supported housing forms and highlight urgency’s pervasive effect on transition processes to supported housing for individuals with intellectual disabilities and the need for around-the-clock support. This study contributes to public management research by examining the process of constructing value propositions and the managers’ efforts to contribute to the formation of more realistic expectations towards the municipality’s scope and level of service among prospective service users and their families. The article contributes to the PSL discourse by providing the complementary concept of expectation–reality mitigation as a particular form of expectation management suited for the complexities and constraints of value creation in public service settings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Risk Management in Public Sector)
25 pages, 2726 KiB  
Article
Film-Induced Tourism as a Key Factor for Promoting Tourism Destination Image: The James Bond Saga Case
by Noelia Araújo-Vila, Lucília Cardoso, Giovana Goretti Feijó Almeida and Paulo Almeida
Adm. Sci. 2024, 14(5), 94; https://doi.org/10.3390/admsci14050094 - 3 May 2024
Viewed by 1211
Abstract
This research extensively discusses the connection between destination image and films influencing tourism. Despite the worldwide fame of the James Bond saga and extensive publications on the subject, research into the role of tourism promotion in the image of destinations is still scarce, [...] Read more.
This research extensively discusses the connection between destination image and films influencing tourism. Despite the worldwide fame of the James Bond saga and extensive publications on the subject, research into the role of tourism promotion in the image of destinations is still scarce, and there is no specific focus on analysing promotional aspects in relation to film-induced tourism. This study focuses on the influence of cinematographic images on the destination image perception and promotion, specifically exploring the case of the James Bond saga as a practical case. With 25 films released since 1962, the James Bond saga provides a basis for evaluating cinematic presence in tourism promotion strategies. This research proposes the content analysis of the official tourist websites of 23 destinations where the James Bond saga was shot, which offer some tourist products linked to the saga. The key findings provide valuable insights into the promotion of James Bond saga tourism destinations, the role of films in promoting destinations, and the tourism products developed from the saga films. The results provide visual outputs about the target image of the film shooting locations, and the text analysis provides keywords linked to the theme. The study’s methodology contributes to the discourse on film tourism and destination image topics and brings practical and theoretical contributions to both academia and destination managers. Full article
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24 pages, 555 KiB  
Article
Effects of Public Service Motivation on R&D Project-Based Team Learning Where Psychological Safety Is a Mediator and Project Management Style Is a Moderator
by Jintana Pattanatornchai, Youji Kohda, Amna Javed, Kalaya Udomvitid and Pisal Yenradee
Adm. Sci. 2024, 14(5), 93; https://doi.org/10.3390/admsci14050093 - 1 May 2024
Viewed by 692
Abstract
While public service motivation (PSM) and teamwork are widely recognized as crucial drivers for effective public service delivery, researchers primarily analyze these factors independently and at a personal level. The existing literature rarely explores the interplay between PSM, the project team learning process [...] Read more.
While public service motivation (PSM) and teamwork are widely recognized as crucial drivers for effective public service delivery, researchers primarily analyze these factors independently and at a personal level. The existing literature rarely explores the interplay between PSM, the project team learning process (PTLP), and psychological safety (PS) within research and development (R&D) project teams, particularly in national R&D organizations. This study addresses this gap by proposing a theoretical model that examines the combined effect of individual motivation and team collaboration, mediated by PS, on R&D PTLP. Additionally, it investigates the moderating influence of project management (PM) styles—fully agile and partially agile—on these relationships. The proposed method utilizes partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) for quantitative data analysis. Our findings revealed a positive relationship between PSM, PS, and R&D PTLP, with PS acting as a significant mediator. Notably, the relationship between PSM and R&D PTLP was stronger under fully agile project management compared to partially agile settings. These findings suggest that both project teams and organizations should prioritize promoting PS and consider the moderating effects of project management styles to foster a sustainable R&D team learning process, particularly within national R&D institutions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Towards a New Research of Public Service Motivation)
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16 pages, 704 KiB  
Article
Expatriate Academics’ Positive Affectivity and Its Influence on Creativity in the Workforce Indigenization Context: Revealing the Role of Perceived Fairness
by Amina Amari
Adm. Sci. 2024, 14(5), 92; https://doi.org/10.3390/admsci14050092 - 1 May 2024
Viewed by 602
Abstract
Workforce indigenization in Gulf Corporation Council (GCC) countries is under-researched in international business literature, especially among expatriate academics from the Middle East and North Africa regions working in GCC countries. Therefore, drawing from the social exchange and conservation of resources theories, this study [...] Read more.
Workforce indigenization in Gulf Corporation Council (GCC) countries is under-researched in international business literature, especially among expatriate academics from the Middle East and North Africa regions working in GCC countries. Therefore, drawing from the social exchange and conservation of resources theories, this study examines the moderating effect of perceived fairness on the relationship between positive affectivity (PA) and creativity in the context of enhanced indigenization of human resource (HR) policies in GCC countries. This study collects data from 228 mobile academics working in Saudi universities. Principal least squares structural equation modeling results show that PA positively impacts creativity. Further, perceived fairness is found to reinforce the connection between PA and creativity. This study’s results indicate that host universities must build appealing HR policies to cope with the diverse challenges related to the indigenization of HR policies. Furthermore, this study highlights the role of positive personality traits in enhancing creativity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diversity, Equity & Inclusion and Its Perception in Organization)
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12 pages, 446 KiB  
Article
An Approach to Sustainable Enterprise Resource Planning System Implementation in Small- and Medium-Sized Enterprises
by Raquel Pérez Estébanez
Adm. Sci. 2024, 14(5), 91; https://doi.org/10.3390/admsci14050091 - 30 Apr 2024
Viewed by 583
Abstract
The adoption of sustainable enterprise resource planning systems in small and medium-sized enterprises represents a strategic response to the evolving landscape of corporate responsibility and environmental stewardship. This study seeks to identify which factors determine the level of satisfaction when implementing a sustainable [...] Read more.
The adoption of sustainable enterprise resource planning systems in small and medium-sized enterprises represents a strategic response to the evolving landscape of corporate responsibility and environmental stewardship. This study seeks to identify which factors determine the level of satisfaction when implementing a sustainable enterprise resource planning system in small- and medium-sized business. A survey was designed to measure managers’ satisfaction with S-ERP implementation in their companies. A multivariate analysis was run to test the factors affecting the level of satisfaction with the implementation. The general results show that the type of module implemented positively and significantly affects the level of satisfaction with S-ERP. One specific result is that the more accounting modules implemented, the more complex the system is, and the more effort is needed to implement the new technology effectively and use it properly. Another result shows that the sales marketing module has an inverse impact on satisfaction with an S-ERP, possibly because this module is complex and difficult to manage. This study contributes significantly to the emerging body of knowledge on S-ERP implementation by seeking to fill the research gap on the interaction between the S-ERP system and user’s satisfaction, focusing on small businesses. Future research directions should delve into the long-term impact of sustainable ERP adoption on SME performance and resilience. Additionally, investigating the effectiveness of government policies in supporting sustainable ERP adoption, along with exploring the actual environmental impact of ERP systems in SMEs, can contribute to advancing our understanding of this dynamic and evolving field. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Business Development within the Sustainable Development Goals)
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20 pages, 697 KiB  
Article
Organizational Climate Scale for Public Service: Development and Validation
by Taiane Keila Matheis, Simone Alves Pacheco de Campos, Kelmara Mendes Vieira, Eliete dos Reis Lehnhart and Vania de Fátima Barros Estivalete
Adm. Sci. 2024, 14(5), 90; https://doi.org/10.3390/admsci14050090 - 28 Apr 2024
Viewed by 553
Abstract
This research presents four studies that developed and validated the Organizational Climate Perception Scale for Public Service (OCPS-PS). The first qualitative study consulted the literature and conducted a focus group to develop the initial version of the scale. The second study involved expert [...] Read more.
This research presents four studies that developed and validated the Organizational Climate Perception Scale for Public Service (OCPS-PS). The first qualitative study consulted the literature and conducted a focus group to develop the initial version of the scale. The second study involved expert evaluation and pre-testing, aiming at the semantic and face validation of the items. This study resulted in 80 items forming the thirteen dimensions of organizational climate. The third study obtained the first quantitative sample for the exploratory validation phase of the scale. The final study, using a new sample, conducted confirmatory tests for the validation of the scale. A methodology for applying the scale was developed, allowing all interested parties to use the OCPS-PS for the assessment of the organizational climate in public service. The results of the four conducted studies indicate the adequacy of the OCPS-PS according to the proposed criteria of validity and reliability. Finally, the OCPS-OS was built to be applied in different public organizations and at different government levels. Full article
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21 pages, 1856 KiB  
Article
Open Government in Spain: An Introspective Analysis
by Ricardo Curto-Rodríguez, Rafael Marcos-Sánchez and Daniel Ferrández
Adm. Sci. 2024, 14(5), 89; https://doi.org/10.3390/admsci14050089 - 28 Apr 2024
Viewed by 587
Abstract
In recent years, there has been an increasing amount of research analyzing open government initiatives that enable access to the information held by public bodies, promoting accountability and the fight against corruption. As there are few studies on intermediate governments to date, this [...] Read more.
In recent years, there has been an increasing amount of research analyzing open government initiatives that enable access to the information held by public bodies, promoting accountability and the fight against corruption. As there are few studies on intermediate governments to date, this research focuses on this level of government in Spain, one of the most decentralized countries in the world. The autonomous communities in Spain manage over 35% of consolidated public spending and are responsible for providing most social services, including health, education, and social services. To achieve this goal, the perceptions of the seventeen heads of open government in Spain’s autonomous communities were collected through a questionnaire. This approach fills a research gap as individuals outside of public administration have made the previous assessments. By allowing for a comparison with the conclusions reached by prior research, this study contributes to the creation of new knowledge. The study’s results are consistent with previous research and suggest that the open government in Spain is positively regarded, not falling below the European or global averages, and has a promising future despite significant obstacles, such as a resistance to change. Transparency is the most developed aspect of open government, while citizen collaboration ranks last. The autonomous communities of the Basque Country, Aragon, Castile Leon, and Catalonia have been identified as the most advanced in terms of open government. The analysis did not reveal any gender-based differences in opinion. Still, it did show variations based on age, the size of the autonomous community, or membership to the most developed group. Therefore, it is evident that promoting open government in the autonomous communities of Spain should continue. Full article
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18 pages, 271 KiB  
Article
Main Challenges of E-Leadership in Municipal Administrations in the Post-Pandemic Context
by Rita Toleikienė, Vita Juknevičienė, Irma Rybnikova, Viktoria Menzel, Inese Abolina and Iveta Reinholde
Adm. Sci. 2024, 14(5), 88; https://doi.org/10.3390/admsci14050088 - 28 Apr 2024
Viewed by 560
Abstract
E-leadership (i.e., remotely leading employees) has become a new normal in the public sector during the pandemic. However, practices of e-leadership differ due to legal, national and even organisational conditions. A deeper analysis is needed to understand what has happened with leadership practices [...] Read more.
E-leadership (i.e., remotely leading employees) has become a new normal in the public sector during the pandemic. However, practices of e-leadership differ due to legal, national and even organisational conditions. A deeper analysis is needed to understand what has happened with leadership practices in municipalities after the COVID-19 pandemic. The aim of the article is to reveal the main challenges of e-leadership in the post-pandemic municipal administrations and to identify e-leaders’ approaches (how they should act) in this context. A qualitative method of online focus groups was used to analyze specifics of the post-pandemic e-leadership in municipal administrations. The research was conducted in Lithuanian, Latvian and German municipal administrations. It was revealed that the use of remote work and e-leadership in municipal administrations after the pandemic heavily depends on the attitudes of supervisors toward work productivity. In addition, ensuring effective digital communication as well as managing social contacts and maintaining team spirit become challenges for e-leadership in municipalities after the pandemic also when remote work is reduced. Full article
34 pages, 1530 KiB  
Article
Organizational Practices’ Role in Managing Open Innovation and Business Performance
by Nada Rabie, Ayman Moustafa and Fatima Al Ghaithi
Adm. Sci. 2024, 14(5), 87; https://doi.org/10.3390/admsci14050087 - 28 Apr 2024
Viewed by 777
Abstract
Given the ever-changing world of technological advances, and due to the fact that business entities strive for efficiency and cost reduction, open innovation (OI) has become the focus of academic and scholarly discussions. Furthermore, to increase their competitiveness, small and medium enterprises (SMEs) [...] Read more.
Given the ever-changing world of technological advances, and due to the fact that business entities strive for efficiency and cost reduction, open innovation (OI) has become the focus of academic and scholarly discussions. Furthermore, to increase their competitiveness, small and medium enterprises (SMEs) have started implementing OI practices. This study aims to investigate the impact of SMEs’ internal organizational practices on OI and the impact of the latter on SMEs’ business performance. This quantitative study, which was based on gathering insights from SMEs, sought to answer two research questions related to the effects of organizational practices on the adoption and management of OI processes in SMEs and the role of OI in accelerating the business performance of SMEs. The findings revealed that not all SMEs’ internal organizational practices have a positive impact on both OI and SMEs’ business performance. This study is among the earliest studies in the UAE and GCC region to explore the impact of specific internal organizational practices on SME OI adoption and its business performance. The present study contributes theoretically and practically to OI literature and assists SME managers in evaluating their internal organizational practices’ suitability for OI adoption. Full article
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22 pages, 341 KiB  
Article
The Impact of Gamification on Slovenian Consumers’ Online Shopping
by Armand Faganel, Filip Pačarić and Igor Rižnar
Adm. Sci. 2024, 14(5), 86; https://doi.org/10.3390/admsci14050086 - 25 Apr 2024
Viewed by 649
Abstract
Gamification involves integrating game mechanics into non-game environments such as business intranets, online communities, websites, and learning management systems to boost participation. Its aim is to actively engage employees, customers, and other stakeholders, fostering collaboration, sharing, and interaction. Gamification is a relatively unfamiliar [...] Read more.
Gamification involves integrating game mechanics into non-game environments such as business intranets, online communities, websites, and learning management systems to boost participation. Its aim is to actively engage employees, customers, and other stakeholders, fostering collaboration, sharing, and interaction. Gamification is a relatively unfamiliar term in Slovenia. The objective of this study is to investigate the influence of gamification on Slovenian consumers, specifically how it affects the online shopping process and user engagement during purchases. To test the hypotheses, we used appropriate statistical tools: chi-square, Friedman, and Wilcoxon tests. The findings indicate that gamification’s strongest influence is not on the post-purchase evaluation phase but rather on the alternative evaluation phase. It is interesting that highly rated reviewers significantly influence product purchases in online stores, while consumers are unwilling to increase their spending on online purchases in exchange for gamification-related benefits. Full article
21 pages, 1057 KiB  
Article
Agro-Investments among Small Farm Business Entrepreneurs in the Era of the Fourth Industrial Revolution: A Case in the Mpumalanga Province, South Africa
by Mzwakhe Nkosi, Azikiwe Isaac Agholor and Oluwasogo David Olorunfemi
Adm. Sci. 2024, 14(5), 85; https://doi.org/10.3390/admsci14050085 - 25 Apr 2024
Viewed by 716
Abstract
Agro-investment in the fourth industrial revolution will be an imperative driving factor and a sacrosanct enabler for small farm business entrepreneurs to participate holistically in the agricultural economic value chain. Investing in advanced technology and entrepreneurship has the potential to promote business modernization [...] Read more.
Agro-investment in the fourth industrial revolution will be an imperative driving factor and a sacrosanct enabler for small farm business entrepreneurs to participate holistically in the agricultural economic value chain. Investing in advanced technology and entrepreneurship has the potential to promote business modernization and improve the productivity and profitability of farm businesses. This study assessed agro-investments in small farm business entrepreneurs in the era of the fourth industrial revolution in Mpumalanga province, South Africa. The study objectives were precisely to determine the perception of small farm business entrepreneurs on agro-investment and examine the impact of agro-investment for small farm business entrepreneurs in the fourth industrial revolution. The questionnaire used in this study employed structured and semi-structured questions for data collection, and an aggregate of 235 participants were randomly selected. The results on perception indicate that small farm business entrepreneurs mostly perceive agro-investment in the fourth industrial revolution as not suitable for small farm business conditions; this may be attributed to modern agricultural implements being predominantly manufactured in accordance with commercial sector specifications. The results from the binary logistic regression analysis on the perception of small farm business entrepreneurs in the fourth industrial revolution revealed that gender (P-value = 0.031), level of education (P-value = 0.04), farm size (P-value = 0.048), farming skills and knowledge (P-value = 0.027), farm productivity (P-value = 0.059) and investment opportunities (P-value = 0.057) were significant and influence the perception of small farm business entrepreneurs. The mean and standard deviation were used to assess the degree of severity of impact. From the results, sources of investment, technology, market participation, economic benefits, and government interventions were discovered to be impactful on agro-investment for small farm business entrepreneurs. The key contributions of agro-investments among small farm business entrepreneurs in the technological era embody catalyzed rural development, a diversified inclusive rural economy, and competitive participation in the agricultural food value chain. Another crucial contribution of the study is unlocking and accentuating the potential and opportunities that investors, technology designers, and manufacturers can exploit in small farm business agro-investments. This paper identifies and recommends that the South African government ought to create enabling environments for agricultural investment activities to thrive, especially among small farm business entrepreneurs, thereby providing grant funding and training, and enabling public-private stakeholder linkages. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Entrepreneurship for Economic Growth)
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20 pages, 1516 KiB  
Article
Critical Perspectives of Organisational Behaviour towards Stakeholders through the Application of Corporate Governance Principles
by Florin-Alexandru Luca, Claudiu-Gabriel Tiganas, Claudia-Elena Grigoras-Ichim, Dumitru Filipeanu and Lucia Morosan-Danila
Adm. Sci. 2024, 14(5), 84; https://doi.org/10.3390/admsci14050084 - 25 Apr 2024
Viewed by 709
Abstract
Corporate governance is gaining interest not only from investors but companies that want to operate in international markets, prompting a more thorough analysis of the field to prioritise stakeholder interests alongside shareholder value. By adopting a holistic approach that considers stakeholders’ diverse needs [...] Read more.
Corporate governance is gaining interest not only from investors but companies that want to operate in international markets, prompting a more thorough analysis of the field to prioritise stakeholder interests alongside shareholder value. By adopting a holistic approach that considers stakeholders’ diverse needs and expectations, companies can build resilience, foster trust, and create sustainable value for all stakeholders, ensuring long-term success and societal impact. This paper analyses corporate governance principles applied at the international, European, and national levels, emphasising the importance of the field for the stakeholders. The practical approach of the paper analyses the application and compliance of the corporate governance code of 18 companies in the field of financial intermediation and insurance, which are listed on the Bucharest Stock Exchange, underlining the crucial role of transparency of operations in instilling confidence and reassurance in stakeholders. The conclusions present proposals for measures to improve corporate governance practices at the level of companies. Full article
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13 pages, 1209 KiB  
Article
Whistleblowing Based on the Three Lines Model
by Paschalis Kagias, Alexandros Garefalakis, Ioannis Passas, Panagiotis Kyriakogkonas and Nikolaos Sariannidis
Adm. Sci. 2024, 14(5), 83; https://doi.org/10.3390/admsci14050083 - 25 Apr 2024
Viewed by 702
Abstract
Directive 1937/2019 on the protection of persons who report breaches of Union law became effective very recently. However, Directive 1937/2019 lacks sufficient guidance on the implementation or governance of whistleblowing frameworks. In addition, the existing literature lacks a definition of whistleblowing and whistleblowing [...] Read more.
Directive 1937/2019 on the protection of persons who report breaches of Union law became effective very recently. However, Directive 1937/2019 lacks sufficient guidance on the implementation or governance of whistleblowing frameworks. In addition, the existing literature lacks a definition of whistleblowing and whistleblowing frameworks that is appropriate for internal audit and fraud prevention. The purpose of this paper is to address the lack of a definition of whistleblowing and whistleblowing framework appropriate for internal auditing and to guide the roles and responsibilities within an organization to apply and maintain a robust whistleblowing framework. To this effect, the Three Lines Model is used, one of the most recognized theoretical models in effective risk governance and internal audit. Full article
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24 pages, 1303 KiB  
Article
Unlocking Value Co-Creation in Entrepreneurial Ecosystems: The Vital Role of Institutions
by Yuko Inada
Adm. Sci. 2024, 14(5), 82; https://doi.org/10.3390/admsci14050082 - 24 Apr 2024
Viewed by 744
Abstract
The entrepreneurial ecosystem is quite complicated because of the presence of numerous stakeholders and the inclusion of multicultural and social elements in diverse communities. The role of entrepreneurship education in developing entrepreneurial skills and aptitude has evolved. The collaboration between universities, companies, and [...] Read more.
The entrepreneurial ecosystem is quite complicated because of the presence of numerous stakeholders and the inclusion of multicultural and social elements in diverse communities. The role of entrepreneurship education in developing entrepreneurial skills and aptitude has evolved. The collaboration between universities, companies, and organizations in the collaborative online international learning (COIL) approach plays an important role in the entrepreneurial ecosystem to enhance value co-creation. To extend the limited literature on value creation through entrepreneurship education among stakeholders and analyze the entrepreneurial ecosystem from a micro perspective, this study investigated why companies and organizations support universities at the individual, organizational, and institutional levels to foster entrepreneurial ecosystems. Following a global career course using the COIL approach, semi-structured interviews were conducted in person or via Zoom with four representatives of the Embassy of Canada to Japan, Ernst & Young, and Manulife from April to May 2022. The modified grounded theory approach was used to analyze the responses from three institutions. The results showed that students were provided with the opportunity to solve actual issues that the three institutions faced and the students’ perspectives were considered to identify and develop high-quality proposals at the individual, organizational, and institutional levels. The institutional philosophy, organizational engagement and development, and personal development of the representatives of these institutions effectively create values within universities while also forming entrepreneurial ecosystems at Japanese and Canadian companies, organizations, and universities to help build the next generation of leaders. This study has important implications through its contribution to society and the development of an entrepreneurial ecosystem in collaboration with the academic, industrial, and public sectors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section International Entrepreneurship)
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