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Neurology International is published by MDPI from Volume 12 Issue 3 (2020). Previous articles were published by another publisher in Open Access under a CC-BY licence, and they are hosted by MDPI on mdpi.com as a courtesy and upon agreement with PAGEPress.

Neurol. Int., Volume 8, Issue 1 (April 2016) – 5 articles

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526 KiB  
Case Report
Central Neurogenic Hyperventilation Related to Post-Hypoxic Thalamic Lesion in a Child
by Pinar Gençpinar, Kamil Karaali, Şenay Haspolat and Oğuz Dursun
Neurol. Int. 2016, 8(1), 6428; https://doi.org/10.4081/ni.2016.6428 - 1 Apr 2016
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 381
Abstract
Central neurogenic hyperventilation (CNH) is a rare clinical condition, whose mechanism is still unclear. Here, we report a 3-year-old male patient, who had bilateral thalamic, putaminal and globus pallideal infarction resulted in CNH without brainstem involvement. This case may illustrate a possible role [...] Read more.
Central neurogenic hyperventilation (CNH) is a rare clinical condition, whose mechanism is still unclear. Here, we report a 3-year-old male patient, who had bilateral thalamic, putaminal and globus pallideal infarction resulted in CNH without brainstem involvement. This case may illustrate a possible role for the thalamus in regulating ventilation. Full article
785 KiB  
Case Report
Metronidazole-Induced Cerebellar Toxicity
by Amit Agarwal, Sangam Kanekar, Shyam Sabat and Krishnamurthy Thamburaj
Neurol. Int. 2016, 8(1), 6365; https://doi.org/10.4081/ni.2016.6365 - 1 Apr 2016
Cited by 49 | Viewed by 733
Abstract
Metronidazole is a very common antibacterial and antiprotozoal with wide usage across the globe, including the least developed countries. It is generally well-tolerated with a low incidence of serious side-effects. Neurological toxicity is fairly common with this drug, however majority of these are [...] Read more.
Metronidazole is a very common antibacterial and antiprotozoal with wide usage across the globe, including the least developed countries. It is generally well-tolerated with a low incidence of serious side-effects. Neurological toxicity is fairly common with this drug, however majority of these are peripheral neuropathy with very few cases of central nervous toxicity reported. We report the imaging findings in two patients with cerebellar dysfunction after Metronidazole usage. Signal changes in the dentate and red nucleus were seen on magnetic resonance imaging in these patients. Most of the cases reported in literature reported similar findings, suggesting high predilection for the dentate nucleus in metronidazole induced encephalopathy. Full article
515 KiB  
Short Communication
Revisiting the Term Neuroprotection in Chronic and Degenerative Diseases
by Marco Orsini, Osvaldo J.M. Nascimento, Andre P.C. Matta, Carlos Henrique Melo Reis, Olivia Gameiro de Souza, Victor Hugo Bastos, Rayele Moreira, Pedro Ribeiro, Stenio Fiorelli, Pietro Novellino, Bruno Pessoa, Mariana Cunha, Camila Pupe, Pedro S. Morales, Pedro F. Moreira Filho, Eduardo Lima Trajano and Acary Bulle Oliveira
Neurol. Int. 2016, 8(1), 6311; https://doi.org/10.4081/ni.2016.6311 - 1 Apr 2016
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 378
Abstract
Thanks to the development of several new researches, the lifetime presented a significant increase, even so, we still have many obstacles to overcome − among them, manage and get responses regarding neurodegenerative diseases. Where we are in the understanding of neuroprotection? Do we [...] Read more.
Thanks to the development of several new researches, the lifetime presented a significant increase, even so, we still have many obstacles to overcome − among them, manage and get responses regarding neurodegenerative diseases. Where we are in the understanding of neuroprotection? Do we really have protective therapies for diseases considered degeneratives such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and its variants, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease and many others? Neuroprotection is defined by many researches as interactions and interventions that can slow down or even inhibit the progression of neuronal degeneration process. We make some considerations on this neuroprotective effect. Full article
577 KiB  
Article
The STOP-BANG Questionnaire as a Screening Tool for Obstructive Sleep Apneainduced Hypertension in Asian Population
by Tanut Pavarangkul, Thipphailin Jungtrakul, Pichsinee Chaobangprom, Luxanawadee Nitiwatthana, Wisit Jongkumchok, Weerachat Morrakotkhiew, Sitthan Kachenchart, Jarin Chindaprasirt, Panita Limpawattana, Sompong Srisaenpang, Somdej Pinitsoontorn and Kittisak Sawanyawisuth
Neurol. Int. 2016, 8(1), 6104; https://doi.org/10.4081/ni.2016.6104 - 1 Apr 2016
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 507
Abstract
Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common public health issue. If left untreated, OSA may cause a large health economic burden from cardiovascular complications particularly stroke. The diagnosis of OSA can be made by polysomnography, but its availability is limited in the developing [...] Read more.
Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common public health issue. If left untreated, OSA may cause a large health economic burden from cardiovascular complications particularly stroke. The diagnosis of OSA can be made by polysomnography, but its availability is limited in the developing countries in Asia. STOP-BANG questionnaire is a good screening tool but may need some adjustment for Asian population. STOP-BANG stands for: Snoring history, Tired during the day, Observed stop breathing while sleep, High blood pressure, body mass index (BMI) more than 35 kg/m2, Age more than 50 years, Neck circumference more than 40 cm and male Gender. We compared clinical features in STOP-BANG questionnaire between 42 OSA induced hypertension patients and 82 healthy control subjects in the Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Thailand. The best cutoff point for the BMI and the neck circumference were 24.5 kg/m2 and 36 cm, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of the BMI cutoff point were 97.2% and 91.40, while those of the neck circumference were 94.7% and 82.9%. In conclusion, the appropriate cutoff points of BMI and neck circumference for Thai STOP-BANG questionnaire were 25 kg/m2 and 36 cm. Full article
787 KiB  
Review
Time Perception Mechanisms at Central Nervous System
by Rhailana Fontes, Jéssica Ribeiro, Daya S. Gupta, Dionis Machado, Fernando Lopes-Júnior, Francisco Magalhães, Victor Hugo Bastos, Kaline Rocha, Victor Marinho, Gildário Lima, Bruna Velasques, Pedro Ribeiro, Marco Orsini, Bruno Pessoa, Marco Antonio Araujo Leite and Silmar Teixeira
Neurol. Int. 2016, 8(1), 5939; https://doi.org/10.4081/ni.2016.5939 - 1 Apr 2016
Cited by 53 | Viewed by 1809
Abstract
The five senses have specific ways to receive environmental information and lead to central nervous system. The perception of time is the sum of stimuli associated with cognitive processes and environmental changes. Thus, the perception of time requires a complex neural mechanism and [...] Read more.
The five senses have specific ways to receive environmental information and lead to central nervous system. The perception of time is the sum of stimuli associated with cognitive processes and environmental changes. Thus, the perception of time requires a complex neural mechanism and may be changed by emotional state, level of attention, memory and diseases. Despite this knowledge, the neural mechanisms of time perception are not yet fully understood. The objective is to relate the mechanisms involved the neurofunctional aspects, theories, executive functions and pathologies that contribute the understanding of temporal perception. Articles form 1980 to 2015 were searched by using the key themes: neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, theories, time cells, memory, schizophrenia, depression, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and Parkinson’s disease combined with the term perception of time. We evaluated 158 articles within the inclusion criteria for the purpose of the study. We conclude that research about the holdings of the frontal cortex, parietal, basal ganglia, cerebellum and hippocampus have provided advances in the understanding of the regions related to the perception of time. In neurological and psychiatric disorders, the understanding of time depends on the severity of the diseases and the type of tasks. Full article
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