Special Issue "Forest Fires under Climate, Social and Economic Changes"

A special issue of Forests (ISSN 1999-4907). This special issue belongs to the section "Forest Ecology and Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Olga Viedma
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Castilla-La Mancha. Avda. Carlos III, 45071 Toledo, Spain
Interests: remote sensing; Lidar; forest fires; land use-land cover changes; statistical models
Prof. Dr. Jose Manuel Moreno
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Castilla-La Mancha. Avda. Carlos III, 45071 Toledo, Spain
Interests: fire ecology; climate change
Dr. Itziar R. Urbieta
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Castilla-La Mancha. Avda. Carlos III, 45071 Toledo, Spain
Interests: fire ecology; climate change

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

During the last few decades, fire activity has been changing in many areas across the world. Changes in climate, landscapes and socioeconomic factors are also associated with such variations. This is particularly important in areas where humans are the major source of ignition and of landscape change and its flammability. Changes in climatic conditions (i.e., warming, increased aridity), the increase in landscape hazardousness as result of LULC changes (i.e., land abandonment, afforestation) and socio-economic restructuring changes due to rural exodus (i.e., population decline, shifts in economic activities) may increase fire activity. Since all these fire drivers are projected to continue to change in the future, addressing how such factors will interact and drive changes in future fire regimes regionally is challenging. We encourage studies from all fields, including experimental studies, monitoring approaches and models to contribute to this Special Issue in order to promote knowledge about dynamical role of driving factors (climate, social and economic changes) on fire activity.

Prof. Dr. Olga Viedma
Prof. Dr. Jose Manuel Moreno
Dr. Itziar R. Urbieta
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Forests is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Fire regime
  • Ignition patterns
  • Climate trends
  • Landscape hazardousness
  • Socio-economic changes
  • Non-stationarity
  • Time series

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Potential Effects of Climate Change on Fire Behavior, Economic Susceptibility and Suppression Costs in Mediterranean Ecosystems: Córdoba Province, Spain
Forests 2019, 10(8), 679; https://doi.org/10.3390/f10080679 - 11 Aug 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
The potentially large ecological, economic, and societal impacts of climate change makes it a significant problem of the 21st century. These consequences have led to tremendous development in climate change scenarios and new technologies to increase knowledge on the effect and efficiency of [...] Read more.
The potentially large ecological, economic, and societal impacts of climate change makes it a significant problem of the 21st century. These consequences have led to tremendous development in climate change scenarios and new technologies to increase knowledge on the effect and efficiency of mitigation and adaptation measures. Large fires will occur at a higher rate than currently because of lower fuel moisture content resulting in a lower resistance to burning. This is also evidenced by more extreme fire behavior that contributes to higher economic impacts, suppression difficulties and suppression costs. The economic susceptibility concept integrates a set of economic valuation approaches for valuing timber and non-timber resources, considering the fire behavior, and as a consequence, the net value changes for each resource. Flame length increased by 4.6% to 15.69%, according to the different future climate scenarios. Climate change is expected to cause widespread changes to economic susceptibility and suppression costs because of higher flame length and fire intensity. Therefore, our outcomes show an increase in the economic susceptibility of Córdoba Province in the medium and long term (2041–2070) between 6.05% and 25.99%, respectively. In addition, we have found an increase between 65.67% and 86.73% in suppression costs in the last decade. The digital version of the economic susceptibility model using Geographic Information Systems improves its operational capabilities enhancing also its dynamism and simplicity to accept modifications and predictions revisions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Forest Fires under Climate, Social and Economic Changes)
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Open AccessArticle
Effects of Climate Change on Burn Probability of Forests in Daxing’anling
Forests 2019, 10(8), 611; https://doi.org/10.3390/f10080611 - 24 Jul 2019
Abstract
Projecting the burn probability (BP) under future climate scenarios would provide a scientific basis for the implementation of forest fire adaptation technology. This study compared the changes in the climate, fire weather, and burn probability during the fire season in Daxing’anling, China. A [...] Read more.
Projecting the burn probability (BP) under future climate scenarios would provide a scientific basis for the implementation of forest fire adaptation technology. This study compared the changes in the climate, fire weather, and burn probability during the fire season in Daxing’anling, China. A burn probability model was established and used to simulate the daily fire occurrence and spread at baseline (1971–2000) and into the 2030s (2021–2050) based on the outputs from five global climate models (GCMs) (GFDL-ESM2M, Had GEM2-ES, IPSL-CM5A-LR, MIROC-ESM-CHEM, and Nor ESM1-M) under four climate scenarios (RCP2.6, RCP4.5, RCP6.0, and RCP8.5). The results showed that the average daily maximum temperature in the fire season will be increased by 2.1 °C (+16.6%) in the 2030s compared with the baseline and precipitation in the fire season will be increased by 7.1%. The average fire weather index (FWI) of the fire season in the 2030s will be increased by 4.2%, but this change is not significant. There will be 39 fires per year in the 2030s, representing an increase of 11.4%. The accuracy of simulated burned areas was 71.2% for the 1991–2010 period. The simulated and observed burned areas showed similar interannual fluctuations during period 1971–2010. The potential burned areas in the 2030s will increase by 18.8% over those in the baseline period and the BP will increase by 19.4%. The implementation of proactive fire management in areas with high predicted BP values will be key for an effective mitigation of future wildfire impacts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Forest Fires under Climate, Social and Economic Changes)
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