Special Issue "Fast Charging System for Electric Vehicles"

A special issue of World Electric Vehicle Journal (ISSN 2032-6653).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Mr. Rick Wolbertus
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Urban Technology, Faculty of Technology, Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences, 1097 DZ Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Interests: charging behaviour; electrical vehicles; policies
Prof. Dr. Robert Van den Hoed
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Urban Technology, Faculty of Technology, Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences, 1097 DZ Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Interests: energy transition; electric mobility; charging infrastructure; socio-technical systems

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Fast charging systems for electric vehicles are becoming increasingly important to facilitate the transition to zero emission mobility. Until just a few years ago, the dominant fast charging power for personal vehicles was 50 kW, while the most recent systems enable charging at speeds of at least 175 kW or even 350 kW. In commercial and logistic fleets, even higher fast charging rates are applied (up to 1 MW)—such as for buses and heavy-duty trucks. Such systems enable much smoother long-distance travel for electric vehicles with shorter charging times and more efficient utilization of the stations from a business perspective.

Developments in fast charging lead to particular challenges related to the integration of charging facilities in the grid, power requirements, impacts of fast charging on batteries (with or without new battery chemistries), added value of storage facilities, as well as compatibility with renewable energy sources. Insights into the use patterns of fast charging stations within daily travel patterns is therefore necessary. Could these patterns be changing with technological developments, and are these developments strong enough to change the current charging paradigm? Similar to level 2 (<22 kW) public charging infrastructures, the rollout and planning of fast charging facilities requires major investments, while best practices are likely to be developed where the business case improves.

Given the developments on the charger and battery side, we are excited about what lays ahead. To get a good overview, we are organizing this Special Issue to address the topic of fast charging systems from multiple angles. We invite original papers on any of the topics below:

Technological developments:

  • Battery management and degradation characteristics in high-power fast charging;
  • Integration of high-power charging systems in the grid;
  • Integration of renewable energy sources in fast charging systems.

Use of fast charging stations

  • Use patterns of fast charging systems for electric vehicles;
  • The impact of fast charging on electric vehicles adoption;
  • Business case for fast charging station operators.

Paradigms in charging

  • Developments and trends in fast charging versus regular charging: under which conditions;
  • Future visions of the dominant charging paradigm.

Planning of fast charging systems

  • Approaches for nationwide fast charging systems;
  • Fast charging systems for logistics (i.e. trucks, delivery vans etc.);
  • Practical issues in implementing fast charging systems.

Mr. Rick Wolbertus
Prof. Dr. Robert Van den Hoed
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. World Electric Vehicle Journal is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Article
Electric Vehicle Ultra-Fast Battery Chargers: A Boost for Power System Stability?
World Electr. Veh. J. 2021, 12(1), 16; https://doi.org/10.3390/wevj12010016 - 23 Jan 2021
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 850
Abstract
As a consequence of the exponential growth of the electric vehicle (EV) market, DC fast-charging infrastructure is being rapidly deployed all around the world. Ultra-fast charging (UFC) stations are starting to pose serious challenges to the electric power system operation, mostly due to [...] Read more.
As a consequence of the exponential growth of the electric vehicle (EV) market, DC fast-charging infrastructure is being rapidly deployed all around the world. Ultra-fast charging (UFC) stations are starting to pose serious challenges to the electric power system operation, mostly due to their high peak power demand and unregulated discontinuous operation. To address these issues, local energy storage can be installed, ensuring a smoother grid power absorption profile and allowing to provide grid-supporting features. In this work, a control solution for the grid-side AC/DC converter of next-generation EV UFC stations is proposed. A virtual synchronous compensator (VSC) control algorithm is implemented, in order to lessen the impact of the charging station on the utility and to provide the full spectrum of grid ancillary services (i.e., frequency regulation, reactive power compensation, harmonic reduction, short circuit current generation, etc.). The proposed control strategy is verified experimentally on a downscaled 15 kVA three-phase inverter, emulating the grid front-end of the charging station. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fast Charging System for Electric Vehicles)
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Article
Fast Charging Systems for Passenger Electric Vehicles
World Electr. Veh. J. 2020, 11(4), 73; https://doi.org/10.3390/wevj11040073 - 13 Nov 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1183
Abstract
This paper explores current and potential future use of fast charging stations for electric passenger vehicles. The aim of the paper is to analyse current charging patterns at fast charging stations and the role of fast charging among different charging options. These patterns [...] Read more.
This paper explores current and potential future use of fast charging stations for electric passenger vehicles. The aim of the paper is to analyse current charging patterns at fast charging stations and the role of fast charging among different charging options. These patterns are explored along the lines of the technical capabilities of the vehicles and it is found that with increasing battery capacity the need for fast charging decreases. However, for those vehicles with large charging capacities there are indications that fast charging is perceived as more convenient as these are used more often. Such results indicate a larger share for fast charging if charging capacities increase in the future. Results from a spatial analysis show that most fast charging is done at a considerable distance from home, suggesting mostly ‘on the road’ charging sessions. Some fast charging sessions are relatively close to home, especially for those without private home charging access. This shows some future potential for fast charging in cities with many on-street parking facilities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fast Charging System for Electric Vehicles)
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Article
Investigating the Future of Ultrafast Charging: A Choice Experiment in the Netherlands
World Electr. Veh. J. 2020, 11(4), 70; https://doi.org/10.3390/wevj11040070 - 07 Nov 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1229
Abstract
Ultrafast charging is developing and will soon be available to electric vehicles (EV). This research focuses on the feasibility of ultrafast charging for EV passenger cars in the Netherlands. We carried out a stated choice experiment with 311 respondents (all EV drivers) and [...] Read more.
Ultrafast charging is developing and will soon be available to electric vehicles (EV). This research focuses on the feasibility of ultrafast charging for EV passenger cars in the Netherlands. We carried out a stated choice experiment with 311 respondents (all EV drivers) and developed mixed logit models based on random utility maximization. In deciding which charging type to choose, this research identified the charging point characteristics, price, proximity to shopping facilities, certainty of charging availability and not having to make a detour as key influential factors for EV drivers. Price changes and not having to make a detour substantially affect users’ choices for the charging types. Contrary to expectations, no significant results were found for urban density, age, technology awareness and importance of sustainability. Finally, the research results show that there is demand for ultrafast charging in the Netherlands even if users have to pay slightly more compared to other forms of charging. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fast Charging System for Electric Vehicles)
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Article
Analysis of Influencing Factors of Thermal Management System for LiFePO4 Lithium Battery under High Power Charging
World Electr. Veh. J. 2020, 11(2), 44; https://doi.org/10.3390/wevj11020044 - 04 Jun 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1033
Abstract
During the high-power charging process, the heat generated by the power battery is significantly increased, resulting in a significant temperature rise, which will bring safety hazards and worsens capacity degradation. In this study, we focus on the energy storage system composed of LiFePO [...] Read more.
During the high-power charging process, the heat generated by the power battery is significantly increased, resulting in a significant temperature rise, which will bring safety hazards and worsens capacity degradation. In this study, we focus on the energy storage system composed of LiFePO4 pouch battery cells whose capacity is 30Ah. The coupling calculation between the one-dimensional electro-chemical model and the 3D heat generation model is realized. The accuracy of the model is verified by charging the battery at different rates. The results show that the inlet flow rate and the cooling channel size within a certain range has a great influence on the cooling effect of the battery pack during high power charging process. Comparing the temperature distribution of the battery pack under different charging rates, the electrochemical-heating coupling model established in this study can truly reflect the heat generation of the battery. Through the calculation of the heat generation of the battery pack, the boundary conditions of the cooling system design can be found, which provides a basis for the optimal design of the conditional cooling system for battery high-power charging. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fast Charging System for Electric Vehicles)
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