Functioning of Small Water Bodies

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Biodiversity and Functionality of Aquatic Ecosystems".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 June 2022) | Viewed by 12330

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Water Protection, Faculty of Biology, Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań, Poland
Interests: Aquatic sciences; Zooplankton Ecology; Biodiversity & Conservation; Ecology and Evolution; Predator - Prey Interactions
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, Rooseveltov trg 6, HR-10000 Zagreb, Croatia
Interests: freshwater ecology; zooplankon and microfaunal ecology; food web interactions; water quality; restoration and conservation
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Water Protection, Faculty of Biology, Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań, Poznań, Poland
Interests: aquatic ecosystems; cyanobacterial blooms; biomonitoring; environmental science; phytoplankton; phytozooplankton relationships; lake restoration; water quality
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Small water bodies play a very important ecoton role, being a transitional system between various biocoenoses and aquatic ecosystems and also creating an interface between terrestrial and aquatic environments. Thus, they build a bridge that connects various wetlands, favouring the migration of many species. Generally, their large abundance worldwide and extensive total area, greater than that covered by lakes, contribute to maintaining high biodiversity. In spite of the fact that ponds located in a landscape with a low degree of transformation harbour decisively higher biodiversity than ponds in areas with a large impact of anthropepression, both types of water body can contribute to the enrichment of flora and fauna on local and regional scales. The high ecological value of these aquatic environments is expressed in the occurrence of specific pond species as well as in a generally high share of rare species that find favourable and often undisturbed life conditions in ponds. The hydrological functions of ponds are very variable throughout the year and highly depend on the level of water storage in the catchment of a water body. Because the number of ponds is generally decreasing, it is essential to develop effective arguments that will lead to the protection and maintainance of these valuable ecosystems.

Prof. Natalia Kuczýnska-Kippen
Prof. Dr. Maria Špoljar
Prof. Dr. Anna Kozak
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Aquatic diversity
  • Ponds and shallow lakes
  • Human impact
  • Biocontamination
  • Relationships between abiotic parameters and biocoenoses
  • Environmental assessment

Published Papers (6 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

16 pages, 2849 KiB  
Article
Gastropod Assemblages Associated with Habitat Heterogeneity and Hydrological Shifts in Two Shallow Waterbodies
by Jasna Lajtner, Anna Kozak, Maria Špoljar, Natalia Kuczyńska-Kippen, Tvrtko Dražina, Mirela Sertić Perić, Ines Tkalčec, Sanja Gottstein and Ivana Zrinščak
Water 2022, 14(15), 2290; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14152290 - 22 Jul 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1644
Abstract
We aimed to determine the effects of water level and habitat heterogeneity on gastropod fauna in the littoral zone, and the differentiation of functional feeding guilds (FFG) of gastropods. Two periods were analyzed: 2012 (low water level, LWL) and 2013 (high water level, [...] Read more.
We aimed to determine the effects of water level and habitat heterogeneity on gastropod fauna in the littoral zone, and the differentiation of functional feeding guilds (FFG) of gastropods. Two periods were analyzed: 2012 (low water level, LWL) and 2013 (high water level, HWL) in the littoral zone of two shallow waterbodies (Sutla backwater, NW Croatia). Waterbody S1, covered with Ceratophyllum demersum, was sampled in the macrophyte stands, and the littoral benthal area, while waterbody S2, without macrophytes, was sampled only in the littoral benthal area. It was observed discovered that among the macrophyte stands in S1, gastropods were significantly more abundant during LWL. The same trend was observed in the littoral benthal area of S2. In contrast, gastropod abundance was higher in the littoral benthal area of S1 during HWL. Comparing gastropods in the two waterbodies, the abundance in S1 was ten times higher than in S2. The most abundant species was Gyraulus parvus, which accounted for 51–92% of the gastropods observed among the macrophytes of S1 and 86% in the adjacent benthic zone. Among the FFG groups, grazers (particularly those feeding on gymnamoebae and rotifers) had the largest proportion, followed by shredders feeding on small pieces of macrophytes. In our research, we indicate the important role of microhabitat diversity and submerged macrophytes as a rich food source for gastropods and safe shelter from predators. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functioning of Small Water Bodies)
Show Figures

Figure 1

17 pages, 2929 KiB  
Article
Sediment as a Refuge Spot for Planktonic Crustaceans
by Maria Špoljar, Natalia Kuczyńska-Kippen, Tvrtko Dražina, Jelena Fressl, Ivančica Ternjej, Tea Tomljanović, Chen Zhang, Marija Purgar, Marko Čorkalo and Lana Kekelj
Water 2022, 14(11), 1680; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14111680 - 24 May 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1886
Abstract
The littoral zone of shallow water bodies (SWB) is often considered in relation to predator–prey interactions. In this study we assumed that the littoral sediment serves as a refuge for planktonic microcrustaceans, mediated by size-dependent fish predation. In order to recognise the impact [...] Read more.
The littoral zone of shallow water bodies (SWB) is often considered in relation to predator–prey interactions. In this study we assumed that the littoral sediment serves as a refuge for planktonic microcrustaceans, mediated by size-dependent fish predation. In order to recognise the impact of fish on their prey, we determined: (i) the assemblage and size structure of crustaceans and fish; and (ii) the biotic interactions along the gradient of the heterogeneity of the littoral zone. The results showed that in the sediment of macrophyte-dominated SWB, large-sized cladocerans predominated and were preyed upon by smaller-sized fish. In the sediment of macrophyte-absent SWB, large-sized copepods dominated, due to the predation risk of larger-sized fish. Cladoceran females with egg broods mostly selected sediment as shelter. Cladocera/Copepoda ratios were lower in the littoral of vegetated SWB, and higher in unvegetated SWB. The ratios in the adjacent sediment revealed an opposite pattern. It is important to point out the findings of planktonic crustacean species in the sediment of SWB are not recorded in the littoral water. The result of this study will contribute to the knowledge of defence strategy mechanisms developed by zooplankters against predators. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functioning of Small Water Bodies)
Show Figures

Figure 1

15 pages, 2918 KiB  
Article
How Do Specific Environmental Conditions in Canals Affect the Structure and Variability of the Zooplankton Community?
by Nikola Kolarova and Paweł Napiórkowski
Water 2022, 14(6), 979; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14060979 - 20 Mar 2022
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2740
Abstract
The present study investigates the responses of zooplankton (including changes in their structure and diversity) to physicochemical and biological parameters in two artificial waterways. Water samples were collected monthly from the Bydgoszcz Canal, the Noteć Canal, and the Brda River during the growing [...] Read more.
The present study investigates the responses of zooplankton (including changes in their structure and diversity) to physicochemical and biological parameters in two artificial waterways. Water samples were collected monthly from the Bydgoszcz Canal, the Noteć Canal, and the Brda River during the growing season of April–October 2019. We analyzed how selected parameters (including water temperature, Secchi disk visibility, oxygen concentration, conductivity, and pH, as well as nitrate, phosphate, and chl-a concentrations) affected seasonal variations in zooplankton diversity (T) and density (N). In total, we recorded 98 species, and average zooplankton density was 320 ind/L. At all sites, the same zooplankton species were dominant: Keratella cochlearis among rotifers and the Cladocera Bosmina longirostris among crustaceans. Rotifers dominated qualitatively and quantitatively over crustaceans. Zooplankton density and biomass, as well as the number of zooplankton species, were higher in the Bydgoszcz Canal than in the Brda River or the Noteć Canal. This may be connected to the locks on the Bydgoszcz Canal slowing down water flow, thereby increasing macrophyte vegetation, which creates ecological niches supporting zooplankton development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functioning of Small Water Bodies)
Show Figures

Figure 1

18 pages, 4010 KiB  
Article
A Vine Copula-Based Modeling for Identification of Multivariate Water Pollution Risk in an Interconnected River System Network
by Ruolan Yu, Rui Yang, Chen Zhang, Maria Špoljar, Natalia Kuczyńska-Kippen and Guoqing Sang
Water 2020, 12(10), 2741; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12102741 - 30 Sep 2020
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 3015
Abstract
The Interconnected River System Network (IRSN) has become a popular and useful measure to realize the long-term health and stability of water bodies. However, there are lots of uncertain consequences derived from natural and anthropogenic pressures on the IRSN, especially the water pollution [...] Read more.
The Interconnected River System Network (IRSN) has become a popular and useful measure to realize the long-term health and stability of water bodies. However, there are lots of uncertain consequences derived from natural and anthropogenic pressures on the IRSN, especially the water pollution risk. In our study, a Vine Copula-based model was developed to assess the water pollution risk in the IRSN. Taking the ponds around Nanyang station as research objects, we selected five proxy indicators from water quality indexes and eutrophication indexes, which included dissolved oxygen (DO), total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorus (TP), chlorophyll-a (Chla), and ammonia nitrogen (NH3-N). Models based on three classes of vine copulas (C-, D-, and R-vine) were utilized respectively to identify the water quality indicators before and after the operation of the connection project. Our results showed that TN, Chla, and NH3-N should be considered as key risk factors. Moreover, we compared the advantages and prediction accuracy of C-, D-, and R-vine to discuss their applications. The results reveal that the Vine Copula-based modeling could provide eutrophication management reference and technical assistance in IRSN projects. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functioning of Small Water Bodies)
Show Figures

Figure 1

25 pages, 2194 KiB  
Article
Neo- and Paleo-Limnological Studies on Diatom and Cladoceran Communities of Subsidence Ponds Affected by Mine Waters (S. Poland)
by Agnieszka Pociecha, Agata Z. Wojtal, Ewa Szarek-Gwiazda, Anna Cieplok, Dariusz Ciszewski and Sylwia Cichoń
Water 2020, 12(6), 1581; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12061581 - 2 Jun 2020
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2335
Abstract
Plankton assemblages can be altered to different degrees by mining. Here, we test how diatoms and cladocerans in ponds along a river in southern Poland respond to the cessation of the long-term Pb-Zn mining. There are two groups of subsidence ponds in the [...] Read more.
Plankton assemblages can be altered to different degrees by mining. Here, we test how diatoms and cladocerans in ponds along a river in southern Poland respond to the cessation of the long-term Pb-Zn mining. There are two groups of subsidence ponds in the river valley. One of them (DOWN) was contaminated over a period of mining, which ceased in 2009, whereas the other (UP) appeared after the mining had stopped. We used diatoms and cladocerans (complete organisms in plankton and their remains in sediments) to reveal the influence of environmental change on the structure and density of organisms. The water of UP pond was more contaminated by major ions (SO42−, Cl) and nutrients (NO3, PO43−) than the DOWN ponds. Inversely, concentrations of Zn, Cd, Cu and Pb were significantly higher in sediment cores of DOWN ponds in comparison to those in the UP pond. Ponds during mining had higher diversity of diatoms and cladocerans than the pond formed after the mining had stopped. CCA showed that diatom and cladoceran communities related most significantly to concentrations of Pb in sediment cores. Comparison of diatom and cladoceran communities in plankton and sediment suggests significant recovery of assemblages in recent years and reduction of the harmful effect of mine-originating heavy metals. Some features of ponds such as the rate of water exchange by river flow and the presence of water plants influenced plankton communities more than the content of dissolved heavy metals. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functioning of Small Water Bodies)
Show Figures

Figure 1

19 pages, 2623 KiB  
Article
Identification of Key Factors Affecting the Trophic State of Four Tropical Small Water Bodies
by Homero Cuevas Madrid, Alfonso Lugo Vázquez, Laura Peralta Soriano, Josué Morlán Mejía, Gloria Vilaclara Fatjó, María del Rosario Sánchez Rodríguez, Marco Antonio Escobar Oliva and Javier Carmona Jiménez
Water 2020, 12(5), 1454; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12051454 - 20 May 2020
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 3646
Abstract
Due to their dimensions, small and shallow water bodies are more sensitive to changes in nutrient load, water flow, and human management. The four water bodies studied are small (area <0.01 km2), constantly supplied by a non-anthropogenic source of nutrients, and [...] Read more.
Due to their dimensions, small and shallow water bodies are more sensitive to changes in nutrient load, water flow, and human management. The four water bodies studied are small (area <0.01 km2), constantly supplied by a non-anthropogenic source of nutrients, and these water bodies present different trophic states: mesotrophic, eutrophic, and hyper-eutrophic. The objective of this study was to identify the key environmental factors that created differences in the trophic state of these adjacent shallow urban lakes by modeling chlorophyll-a (Chl a) through the application of the Partial Least Squares Regression (PLSR). The models (n = 36) explain 45.8–60.6% (R2), and predicts 39–52.9% (Q2) of the variance. Environmental variables were identified in the water bodies as critical factors of trophic state determination, water residence time (WRT), ions (e.g., Ca2+), and minerals as hydroxyapatite (HAP). These variables were related to processes that could improve trophic conditions, such as flushing and phosphorous precipitation. Conversely, N-NH3 concentration was associated with nutrient recycling, and found to be able to promote eutrophication. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functioning of Small Water Bodies)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop