Special Issue "Sustainable Water Futures: Climate, Community and Circular Economy"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Urban Water Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 March 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Ataur Rahman
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Civil and Environmental Engineering, School of Computing, Engineering and Mathematics, University of Western Sydney, Locked Bag 1797, Penrith, NSW 2751, Australia
Interests: water and environmental engineering; hydrology; climate change impacts; floods; water-sensitive urban design; rainwater harvesting; engineering education
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Abdullah Al Mamun
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Climate, Circularity, Sustainability and Community (CCSC) Research, Department of Folklore, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Rajshahi, Rajshahi, Bangladesh
Interests: environment and sustainability; climate and policy; circularity and community; heritage and folkloristics; development and sustainability
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Water is life, and no one can ignore the necessities of water in our life while humankind is facing both global and local water challenges such as climate change, water diversity loss, fresh drinking water scarcity and pollution. The need for sustainable water futures gains momentum as environmental and resource scarcity is increasing due to climate change. The transition and actions to the circular economy could be a nature-positive way of promoting a sustainable water future. Meanwhile, trickle-down economics could be reshaped following a bottom-up approach in the light of doughnut economics and circular economics in reducing the gap between people, water, nature, culture and civic engagement. The innovations and novel research work without undermining the planet by engineers, planners, architects, social and natural scientists could play a pivotal role in keeping positive planetary boundaries. Because the water, drinking water, water-related resources, water-based livelihoods, waterways and communities come under threat due to global warming and severe climate change, resource degradation, population growth, the inequitable distribution resources distribution and so on, therefore, transitioning to the Circular Economy and tackling the impacts of climate change is a high need of the hour to meet Sustainable Water Futures.

Objectives

  1. Our call for papers aims to study how economic activities from the consumption of water and water-related resources can be decoupled to build resilience, generate economic opportunities and provide global to local environmental and societal benefits.
  2. The call for paper has a mission to understand how community-led and community-driven conservation, management and restoration activities of water and waterways can ensure the community's wellbeing and provide access to fresh water in the city to the county.
  3. The aim is to assess how nature-based blue economies and circular solutions can address and alleviate global to local challenges such as climate change, water diversity loss, scarcity and pollution.
  4. The aim is also to cover articles that view water as a part of environmental and social needs covering holistic water management such as water-sensitive urban design, the recreational use of water and social hydrology.

Prof. Dr. Ataur Rahman
Prof. Abdullah Al Mamun 
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • circular innovation for water, community, and climate
  • wastewater treatment and recycling, sustainable manufacturing
  • waterways, Wetlands management and conservation, circularity
  • rainwater, irrigation, AgTech, small-scale water resources planning
  • hydroponics, floating gardening, flood adaptation, hydrology
  • drought, groundwater crisis, water stress, financing water
  • drinking water, water hazards, indigenous water knowledge
  • aquaculture, water resources processing and management
  • water heritage, environmental folkloristics, and local communities
  • riverine ecosystems, water planning and climate policy
  • blue economy, integrated planning, and sustainability
  • drinking water, water-related resources, water-based livelihoods
  • water ecosystems, water governance, and circular economy
  • water sensitive urban design, social hydrology
  • rural water supply, life cycle analysis of water projects

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Article
Production of Fresh Water by a Solar Still: An Experimental Case Study in Australia
Water 2021, 13(23), 3373; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13233373 - 30 Nov 2021
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Abstract
There is a scarcity of fresh water in many rural communities where solar stills can be used to produce drinking water at a minimal cost. These stills use solar energy, which is a sustainable form of energy, and hence this can contribute towards [...] Read more.
There is a scarcity of fresh water in many rural communities where solar stills can be used to produce drinking water at a minimal cost. These stills use solar energy, which is a sustainable form of energy, and hence this can contribute towards achievement of United Nations (UN) Sustainable Development Goals (SDG). This study aims to develop empirical models of a solar stills based on experimental data obtained at Werrington South, New South Wales, Australia. Two solar stills were used in the experiment, a conventional design (Con-Still) and a con-still modified with adding extra thermal mass inside the still (mod-still). Regression analysis was adopted to develop prediction equations using Pi (productivity in L/m2/day) as the response variable and ambient temperature (Ta), sky temperature (Ts19), global radiation (Gh), and wind velocity (W) as the predictor variables. The mean and median productivity values of the mod-still were found to be 17%, and 22% higher than that those for the con-still. The proposed mod-still can be further improved and used in rural areas to produce fresh water from sea water and other forms of contaminated water. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Water Futures: Climate, Community and Circular Economy)
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Review
A Bibliometric Analysis of Drought Indices, Risk, and Forecast as Components of Drought Early Warning Systems
by , and
Water 2022, 14(2), 253; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14020253 - 16 Jan 2022
Abstract
In this study, we apply a bibliometric analysis to characterize publication data on droughts, mainly focusing on drought indices (DIs), drought risk (DR), and drought forecast (DF). Data on publications on these selected topics were obtained through the Scopus database, covering the period [...] Read more.
In this study, we apply a bibliometric analysis to characterize publication data on droughts, mainly focusing on drought indices (DIs), drought risk (DR), and drought forecast (DF). Data on publications on these selected topics were obtained through the Scopus database, covering the period from 1963 to June 2021. The DI-related publications, based on meteorological, soil moisture, hydrological, remote sensing, and composite/modeled Dis, accounted for 57%, 8%, 4%, 29%, and 2% of the scientific sources, respectively. DI-related studies showed a notable increase since the 1990s, due perhaps to a higher number of major droughts during the last three decades. It was found that USA and China were the two leading countries in terms of publication count and academic influence on the DI, DR, and DF studies. A network analysis of the country of residence of co-authors on DR and DF research highlighted the top three countries, which were the USA, China, and the United Kingdom. The most productive journal for the DI studies was found to be the International Journal of Climatology, whereas Natural Hazards was identified as the first-ranked journal for the DR and DF studies. In relation to individual researchers, Singh VP from the USA was found to be the most prolific author, having the greatest academic influence on DF study, whereas Zhang Q from China was identified as the most productive author on DR study. This bibliometric analysis reveals that further research is needed on droughts in the areas of risk management, water management, and drought management. This review maps trends of previous research in drought science, covering several important aspects, such as drought indices, geographic regions, authors and their collaboration paths, and sub-topics of interest. This article is expected to serve as an index of the current state of knowledge on drought warning systems and as guidance for future research needs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Water Futures: Climate, Community and Circular Economy)
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