Emerging Zoonotic Paramyxoviruses

A special issue of Viruses (ISSN 1999-4915). This special issue belongs to the section "Animal Viruses".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2024 | Viewed by 2005

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, Geelong, Australia
Interests: virology; emerging infectious diseases; animal models; pre-clinical vaccine and therapeutic testing
Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, Geelong, Australia
Interests: virology; emerging infectious diseases; animal models; serological assays; viral infection

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Paramyxoviruses are a large family of negative-sense RNA viruses with a broad host tropism. Several bat-borne paramyxoviruses have been identified as zoonotic, including henipaviruses and pararubulaviruses. The two original members of the henipavirus genus (Hendra and Nipah viruses) are lethal in humans and animals, whereas other more recently discovered members are non-pathogenic or have an unknown pathogenicity. Zoonotic pararubulaviruses, such as the Menangle virus, can cause mild flu-like symptoms in humans or be asymptomatic. In recent years, we have seen an increase in the identification of emerging zoonotic paramyxoviruses, particularly from bat species.   

In this Special Issue, we aim to provide original and review articles describing newly emerging zoonotic paramyxoviruses and advances in the knowledge of recently emerged zoonotic paramyxoviruses.

Dr. Glenn Marsh
Jennifer Barr
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • paramyxovirus
  • zoonotic
  • bat

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

16 pages, 2126 KiB  
Review
Recently Emerged Novel Henipa-like Viruses: Shining a Spotlight on the Shrew
by Sarah Caruso and Sarah J. Edwards
Viruses 2023, 15(12), 2407; https://doi.org/10.3390/v15122407 - 11 Dec 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1507
Abstract
Henipaviruses are zoonotic viruses, including some highly pathogenic and capable of serious disease and high fatality rates in both animals and humans. Hendra virus and Nipah virus are the most notable henipaviruses, resulting in significant outbreaks across South Asia, South-East Asia, and Australia. [...] Read more.
Henipaviruses are zoonotic viruses, including some highly pathogenic and capable of serious disease and high fatality rates in both animals and humans. Hendra virus and Nipah virus are the most notable henipaviruses, resulting in significant outbreaks across South Asia, South-East Asia, and Australia. Pteropid fruit bats have been identified as key zoonotic reservoirs; however, the increased discovery of henipaviruses outside the geographic distribution of Pteropid fruit bats and the detection of novel henipa-like viruses in other species such as the shrew, rat, and opossum suggest that Pteropid bats are not the sole reservoir for henipaviruses. In this review, we provide an update on henipavirus spillover events and describe the recent detection of novel unclassified henipaviruses, with a strong focus on the shrew and its emerging role as a key host of henipaviruses. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Zoonotic Paramyxoviruses)
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