Special Issue "Comparative Studies of Antimicrobial Resistance in Bacteria of Animals and Humans"

A special issue of Veterinary Sciences (ISSN 2306-7381).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2018).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. med. Olivier Denis

Guest Editor
Ecole de Santé Publique, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Avenue Franklin Roosevelt 50, 1050 Brussels, Belgium
Interests: staphylococci; Gram-negative; antimicrobial resistance; virulence; human pathogens
Prof. Dr. Marie Archambault
Website
Guest Editor
Centre de Recherche en Infectiologie Porcine et Aviaire (CRIPA) and Op+lait, Faculté de médecine vétérinaire Département de pathologie et microbiologie Université de Montréal 3 200 Rue Sicotte, J2S 2M2 Saint-Hyacinthe (Québec) Canada
Interests: antimicrobial resistance; virulence; animal pathogens
Dr. Sandrine Roisin
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Microbiology, Hôpital Erasme, Université Libre de Bruxelles Route de Lennik 808 1070 Brussels Belgium
Interests: staphylococci; Gram-negative; antimicrobial resistance; human pathogens; NGS
Dr. Maria Ángeles Argudín

Guest Editor
Department of Microbiology, Hôpital Erasme Université Libre de Bruxelles Route de Lennik 808 1070 Brussels, Belgium
Interests: staphylococci; antimicrobial resistance; virulence; molecular typing; NGS

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The discovery of antimicrobial agents in the mid-twentieth century revolutionized the management and treatment of bacterial infections. Infections that would normally have been fatal became curable. Ever since then, antimicrobial agents have saved the lives of millions of people. However, these gains are now seriously jeopardized by the rapid emergence and spread of microbes that are resistant to antimicrobials.

Antimicrobials are used for therapy and prevention of diseases and are still used for growth-promotion in food animal productions in some countries. Resistance may spread from animals to humans and vice versa directly or indirectly via antimicrobial resistance genes. Effective therapy should be instituted without delay with antibiotics that are empirically selected based on the most probable pathogens and the local prevalence of resistant strains. However, these data are frequently not available.

In this Special Issue, we welcome original articles, short communications and mini-reviews on the antimicrobial resistance situation in bacteria of animal and human origins (this includes pathogenic, commensal and zoonotic bacteria), the transfer of livestock-associated antimicrobial resistance determinants to human bacteria, and conversely.

Prof. Dr. Olivier Denis
Prof. Dr. Marie Archambault
Dr. Sandrine Roisin
Dr. Maria A. Argudín
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Veterinary Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Molecular typing
  • antimicrobial resistance
  • food animals
  • companion animals

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Risk Factors of Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase Producing Enterobacteriaceae Occurrence in Farms in Reunion, Madagascar and Mayotte Islands, 2016–2017
Vet. Sci. 2018, 5(1), 22; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci5010022 - 23 Feb 2018
Cited by 5
Abstract
In South Western Indian ocean (IO), Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-E) are a main public health issue. In livestock, ESBL-E burden was unknown. The aim of this study was estimating the prevalence of ESBL-E on commercial farms in Reunion, Mayotte and Madagascar and [...] Read more.
In South Western Indian ocean (IO), Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-E) are a main public health issue. In livestock, ESBL-E burden was unknown. The aim of this study was estimating the prevalence of ESBL-E on commercial farms in Reunion, Mayotte and Madagascar and genes involved. Secondly, risk factors of ESBL-E occurrence in broiler, beef cattle and pig farms were explored. In 2016–2017, commercial farms were sampled using boot swabs and samples stored at 4 °C before microbiological analysis for phenotypical ESBL-E and gene characterization. A dichotomous questionnaire was performed. Prevalences observed in all production types and territories were high, except for beef cattle in Reunion, which differed significantly. The most common ESBL gene was blaCTX-M-1. Generalized linear models explaining ESBL-E occurrence varied between livestock production sectors and allowed identifying main protective (e.g., water quality control and detergent use for cleaning) and risk factors (e.g., recent antibiotic use, other farmers visiting the exploitation, pet presence). This study is the first to explore tools for antibiotic resistance management in IO farms. It provides interesting hypothesis to explore about antibiotic use in IO territories and ESBL-E transmission between pig, beef cattle and humans in Madagascar. Full article
Open AccessArticle
Genomic Analysis of Third Generation Cephalosporin Resistant Escherichia coli from Dairy Cow Manure
Vet. Sci. 2017, 4(4), 57; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci4040057 - 17 Nov 2017
Cited by 5
Abstract
The production of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) conferring resistance to new derivatives of β-lactams is a major public health threat if present in pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria. The objective of this study was to characterize ceftiofur (TIO)- or cefotaxime (FOX)-resistant Escherichia coli isolated from dairy [...] Read more.
The production of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) conferring resistance to new derivatives of β-lactams is a major public health threat if present in pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria. The objective of this study was to characterize ceftiofur (TIO)- or cefotaxime (FOX)-resistant Escherichia coli isolated from dairy cow manure. Twenty-four manure samples were collected from four farms and incubated under anaerobic conditions for 20 weeks at 4 °C or at 25 °C. A total of 37 TIO- or FOX-resistant E. coli were isolated from two of the four farms to determine their susceptibility to 14 antibiotics. Among the 37 resistant E. coli, 10 different serotypes were identified, with O8:H1 being the predominant serotype (n = 17). Five isolates belonged to each of serotypes O9:NM and O153:H42, respectively. All 37 cephalosporin resistant isolates were multi-resistant with the most prevalent resistance spectrum being amoxicillin-clavulanic acid-ampicillin-cefoxitin-ceftiofur-ceftriaxone-chloramphenicol-streptomycin-sulfisoxazole-tetracycline-trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. The genomes of 18 selected isolates were then sequenced and compared to 14 selected human pathogenic E. coli reference genomes obtained from public repositories using different bioinformatics approaches. As expected, all 18 sequenced isolates carried at least one β-lactamase bla gene: TEM-1, TEM-81, CTX-M115, CTX-M15, OXA-1, or CMY-2. Several other antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) and virulence determinants were detected in the sequenced isolates and all of them harbored antimicrobial resistance plasmids belonging to classic Inc groups. Our results confirm the presence of diverse ESBL producing E. coli isolates in dairy cow manure stored for a short period of time. Such manure might constitute a reservoir of resistance and virulence genes for other bacteria that share the same environment. Full article
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Open AccessReview
Resistance to Carbapenems in Non-Typhoidal Salmonella enterica Serovars from Humans, Animals and Food
Vet. Sci. 2018, 5(2), 40; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci5020040 - 08 Apr 2018
Cited by 17
Abstract
Non-typhoidal serovars of Salmonella enterica (NTS) are a leading cause of food-borne disease in animals and humans worldwide. Like other zoonotic bacteria, NTS have the potential to act as reservoirs and vehicles for the transmission of antimicrobial drug resistance in different settings. Of [...] Read more.
Non-typhoidal serovars of Salmonella enterica (NTS) are a leading cause of food-borne disease in animals and humans worldwide. Like other zoonotic bacteria, NTS have the potential to act as reservoirs and vehicles for the transmission of antimicrobial drug resistance in different settings. Of particular concern is the resistance to critical “last resort” antimicrobials, such as carbapenems. In contrast to other Enterobacteriaceae (e.g., Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, and Enterobacter, which are major nosocomial pathogens affecting debilitated and immunocompromised patients), carbapenem resistance is still very rare in NTS. Nevertheless, it has already been detected in isolates recovered from humans, companion animals, livestock, wild animals, and food. Five carbapenemases with major clinical importance—namely KPC (Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase) (class A), IMP (imipenemase), NDM (New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase), VIM (Verona integron-encoded metallo-β-lactamase) (class B), and OXA-48 (oxacillinase, class D)—have been reported in NTS. Carbapenem resistance due to the production of extended spectrum- or AmpC β-lactamases combined with porin loss has also been detected in NTS. Horizontal gene transfer of carbapenemase-encoding genes (which are frequently located on self-transferable plasmids), together with co- and cross-selective adaptations, could have been involved in the development of carbapenem resistance by NTS. Once acquired by a zoonotic bacterium, resistance can be transmitted from humans to animals and from animals to humans through the food chain. Continuous surveillance of resistance to these “last resort” antibiotics is required to establish possible links between reservoirs and to limit the bidirectional transfer of the encoding genes between S. enterica and other commensal or pathogenic bacteria. Full article
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