Special Issue "Foodborne Zoonoses at the Human-Animal-Environment Interface"

A special issue of Veterinary Sciences (ISSN 2306-7381).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Ihab Habib
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Assistant Professor, Veterinary Medicine Department, United Arab Emirates University (UAEU), Al Ain, United Arab Emirates, and; School of Veterinary Medicine, Murdoch University, Perth, Australia
Interests: Campylobacter; Salmonella; One Health; Antimicrobial Resistance
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Sofia Boqvist
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Associate Professor, Department of Biomedical Science and Veterinary Public Health; Division of Bacteriology and Food Safety, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Uppsala, Sweden
Interests: Food Safety; Zoonoses; Veterinary Public Health; One Health

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The interface between humans, animals, and the environments we share can be a source of diseases that impact public health and the social and economic well-being of the world population. This Special Issue will promote a holistic research approach towards the characterization and management of foodborne zoonoses in a One Health approach. This Special Issue welcomes research and reviews aiming towards a better understanding of the interdependent relationship between foodborne zoonoses and production animals we depend on for our food, livelihoods, and well-being, as well as with the environments we live and work in together. Research on farm-level biosecurity, food chain risk factors, and farm-to-fork baseline data on the prevalence of foodborne pathogens and their antimicrobial resistance and (molecular) epidemiology are also of interest and we encourage such submissions.

Dr. Ihab Habib
Dr. Sofia Boqvist
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Veterinary Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Camlpylobacter
  • Salmonella
  • Foodborne Zoonoses
  • Farm Biosecurity
  • Molecular Epidemiology
  • Food Safety Risk Assessment
  • Antimicrobial resistance in the food chain
  • One Health
  • Novel food and emerging risk
  • Food hygiene in low and middle-income countries

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Article
High Prevalence of Multiple Antibiotic-Resistant, Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase (ESBL)-Producing Escherichia coli in Fresh Seafood Sold in Retail Markets of Mumbai, India
Vet. Sci. 2020, 7(2), 46; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci7020046 - 16 Apr 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1435
Abstract
In this study, fresh seafood in retail markets was investigated for the antibiotic susceptibility patterns of the faecal indicator Escherichia coli and distribution of important β-lactamase encoding genes. E. coli were isolated from 50 (37 fish and 13 shellfish) fresh seafood samples and [...] Read more.
In this study, fresh seafood in retail markets was investigated for the antibiotic susceptibility patterns of the faecal indicator Escherichia coli and distribution of important β-lactamase encoding genes. E. coli were isolated from 50 (37 fish and 13 shellfish) fresh seafood samples and studied with respect to the phenotypic and genotypic characters of antibiotic resistance. Of 475 E. coli isolates from fresh seafood, 71.58% exhibited extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-positive phenotypes. A high percentage of isolates were resistant to indicator cephalosporins cefotaxime (95%), cefpodoxime (90.88%) and ceftazidime (90.29%). Relatively higher susceptibilities were recorded against imipenem (74.41%), cefoxitin (66.76%) and meropenem (51.18%). The multiple antibiotic resistance (MAR) index of 97.35% of the isolates was above 0.18. The ESBL genes blaCTX-M, blaSHV and blaTEM were detected in 62.37%, 23.35% and 2.6% of E. coli isolates, respectively. The ESBL-producing isolates also harboured the metallo-β-lactamase-encoding genes blaOXA (7.06%), blaNDM (4.42%) and blaVIM (0.88%). This study highlights the risk of dissemination of multidrug resistant E. coli in seafood consumer communities and also the need to improve the hygiene of the coastal waters, landing centres and the retail markets. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Foodborne Zoonoses at the Human-Animal-Environment Interface)
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Review

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Review
Food Safety Considerations Related to the Consumption and Handling of Game Meat in North America
Vet. Sci. 2020, 7(4), 188; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci7040188 - 25 Nov 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1201
Abstract
Emerging foodborne pathogens present a threat to public health. It is now recognized that several foodborne pathogens originate from wildlife as demonstrated by recent global disease outbreaks. Zoonotic spillover events are closely related to the ubiquity of parasitic, bacterial, and viral pathogens present [...] Read more.
Emerging foodborne pathogens present a threat to public health. It is now recognized that several foodborne pathogens originate from wildlife as demonstrated by recent global disease outbreaks. Zoonotic spillover events are closely related to the ubiquity of parasitic, bacterial, and viral pathogens present within human and animal populations and their surrounding environment. Foodborne diseases have economic and international trade impacts, incentivizing effective wildlife disease management. In North America, there are no food safety standards for handling and consumption of free-ranging game meat. Game meat consumption continues to rise in North America; however, this growing practice could place recreational hunters and game meat consumers at increased risk of foodborne diseases. Recreational hunters should follow effective game meat food hygiene practices from harvest to storage and consumption. Here, we provide a synthesis review that evaluates the ecological and epidemiological drivers of foodborne disease risk in North American hunter populations that are associated with the harvest and consumption of terrestrial mammal game meat. We anticipate this work could serve as a foundation of preventive measures that mitigate foodborne disease transmission between free-ranging mammalian and human populations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Foodborne Zoonoses at the Human-Animal-Environment Interface)
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