Special Issue "Zoonotic and Emerging Diseases at Human-Animal Interface"

A special issue of Veterinary Sciences (ISSN 2306-7381).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Muhammad Munir

Lecturer in Virology, Division of Biomedical and Life Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medicine, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YG, United Kingdom
Website | E-Mail
Interests: zoonoses; host–pathogen interaction; evolution; genetics; disease pathogenesis; control of infections

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the last three decades, at least 30 new pathogens found in humans were zoonotic: New diseases are coming from animals and they do not respect regional boundaries. A significant progress is being made in understanding the evolution, epidemiology, host–pathogen interactions, devising next-generation control strategies, assessing socio-economic impacts and mapping global research opportunities.

To prepare for future outbreaks and build on existing knowledge of zoonotic and emerging diseases, this Special Issue calls for leading researchers to contribute their recent findings, especially focusing on, but not limited to:

  • Epidemiology and Evolution
  • Host-pathogen interaction
  • Vaccines and immunity
  • Next generation control strategies
  • Socio-economic impacts
Dr. Muhammad Munir
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Veterinary Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 350 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Zoonoses
  • host pathogen interaction
  • evolution
  • genetics
  • disease pathogenesis
  • control of infections

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Salmonella Surveillance Systems in Swine and Humans in Spain: A Review
Vet. Sci. 2019, 6(1), 20; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci6010020
Received: 10 January 2019 / Revised: 13 February 2019 / Accepted: 16 February 2019 / Published: 20 February 2019
PDF Full-text (2575 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Non-typhoid salmonellosis is a common and problematic foodborne zoonotic disease in which pork and pork products can be an important potential source of infection. To prevent this disease, important efforts to monitor the situation in the main source, livestock, are conducted in most [...] Read more.
Non-typhoid salmonellosis is a common and problematic foodborne zoonotic disease in which pork and pork products can be an important potential source of infection. To prevent this disease, important efforts to monitor the situation in the main source, livestock, are conducted in most developed countries. In the European Union, European Food Safety Agency (EFSA) and European Center for Disease Control (ECDC) compile information at the member-state level, even though important differences in production systems and surveillance systems exist. Here, Salmonella surveillance systems in one of the main sources of foodborne salmonellosis, swine, and humans in Spain were reviewed to identify potential gaps and discuss potential ways of integration under a “One-Health” approach. Despite the extensive information generated through the surveillance activities, source attribution can be only routinely performed through ad-hoc outbreak investigations, and national reports on human outbreaks do not provide sufficiently detailed information to gain a better understanding of the epidemiology of the pathogen. Human and animal monitoring of Salmonella would benefit from a better exchange of information and collaboration. Analysis of spatio-temporal trends in livestock and humans could help to identify likely sources of infection and to target surveillance efforts in areas with higher prevalence or where specific strains are found. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Zoonotic and Emerging Diseases at Human-Animal Interface)
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