New insights on Veterinary Dentistry and Oral Surgery

A special issue of Veterinary Sciences (ISSN 2306-7381).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 December 2021) | Viewed by 14387

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Veterinary Sciences, Univesity of Trás-os-Montes e Alto Douro, 5000-801 Vila Real, Portugal
Interests: veterinary dentistry and oral surgery; regenerative medicine; medical imaging

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Guest Editor
Department of Veterinary Sciences, University of Trás-os-Montes e Alto Douro, Quinta de Prados, 5000-801 Vila Real, Portugal
Interests: small animals gastroenterology; clinical genomics; regenerative medicine; veterinary dentistry; ethics and deontology; clinical nutrition

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Guest Editor
Faculty of Veterinary, Complutense University of Madrid, Madrid, Spain

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Veterinary dentistry is one of the clinical specialties of veterinary medicine and has experienced greater attention in recent years. The interest in this area dates back more than 2000 years. The evolution of knowledge in this field is being materialized with the development of new ancillary exams for the diagnosis of dental and oral pathology, the innovation of therapeutic approaches, and recognition of the relationship between local disease and its systemic manifestations. Veterinary dentistry is primarily focused on companion animals, such as dogs, cats, and horses, but can include exotic, wild, and zoo species. Some animal models are considered adequate for investigating the disease in humans.

This Special Issue of Veterinary Sciences, “Veterinary Dentistry and Oral Surgery”, is inviting original articles, brief communications, and reviews on oral and dental diseases in animals. We hope that this collection will stimulate closer collaboration between researchers in the veterinary and medical sciences in addressing this important topic.

prof. João Filipe Martins Freire Requicha

Prof. Carlos Alberto Antunes Viegas

Prof. Fidel San Román Ascaso
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Veterinary Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • veterinary dentistry
  • oral surgery
  • pathology
  • imaging
  • regeneration

Published Papers (4 papers)

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17 pages, 5203 KiB  
Article
Effectiveness of a Nanohydroxyapatite-Based Hydrogel on Alveolar Bone Regeneration in Post-Extraction Sockets of Dogs with Naturally Occurring Periodontitis
by Kittidaj Tanongpitchayes, Chamnan Randorn, Suphatchaya Lamkhao, Komsanti Chokethawai, Gobwute Rujijanagul, Kannika Na Lampang, Luddawon Somrup, Chavalit Boonyapakorn and Kriangkrai Thongkorn
Vet. Sci. 2022, 9(1), 7; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci9010007 - 26 Dec 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 3618
Abstract
Pathological mandibular fracture after dental extraction usually occurs in dogs with moderate to severe periodontitis. A nanohydroxyapatite-based hydrogel (HAP hydrogel) was developed to diminish the limitations of hydroxyapatite for post-extraction socket preservation (PSP). However, the effect of the HAP hydrogel in dogs has [...] Read more.
Pathological mandibular fracture after dental extraction usually occurs in dogs with moderate to severe periodontitis. A nanohydroxyapatite-based hydrogel (HAP hydrogel) was developed to diminish the limitations of hydroxyapatite for post-extraction socket preservation (PSP). However, the effect of the HAP hydrogel in dogs has still not been widely investigated. Moreover, there are few studies on PSP in dogs suffering from clinical periodontitis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the HAP hydrogel for PSP in dogs with periodontitis. In five dogs with periodontitis, the first molar (309 and 409) of each hemimandible was extracted. Consequently, all the ten sockets were filled with HAP-hydrogel. Intraoral radiography was performed on the day of operation and 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks post operation. The Kruskal–Wallis test and paired t-test were adopted for alveolar bone regeneration analysis. The results demonstrated that the radiographic grading, bone height measurement, and bone regeneration analysis were positively significant at all follow-up times compared to the day of operation. Moreover, the scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy imaging after immersion showed a homogeneous distribution of apatite formation on the hydrogel surface. Our investigation suggested that the HAP hydrogel effectively enhances socket regeneration in dogs with periodontitis and can be applied as a bone substitute for PSP in veterinary dentistry. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New insights on Veterinary Dentistry and Oral Surgery)
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12 pages, 3039 KiB  
Article
Assessment of Changes in the Oral Microbiome That Occur in Dogs with Periodontal Disease
by Rodrigo Santibáñez, Camila Rodríguez-Salas, Carla Flores-Yáñez, Daniel Garrido and Pamela Thomson
Vet. Sci. 2021, 8(12), 291; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci8120291 - 27 Nov 2021
Cited by 15 | Viewed by 4072
Abstract
The oral microbiome in dogs is a complex community. Under some circumstances, it contributes to periodontal disease, a prevalent inflammatory disease characterized by a complex interaction between oral microbes and the immune system. Porphyromonas and Tannerella spp. are usually dominant in this disease. [...] Read more.
The oral microbiome in dogs is a complex community. Under some circumstances, it contributes to periodontal disease, a prevalent inflammatory disease characterized by a complex interaction between oral microbes and the immune system. Porphyromonas and Tannerella spp. are usually dominant in this disease. How the oral microbiome community is altered in periodontal disease, especially sub-dominant microbial populations is unclear. Moreover, how microbiome functions are altered in this disease has not been studied. In this study, we compared the composition and the predicted functions of the microbiome of the cavity of healthy dogs to those with from periodontal disease. The microbiome of both groups clustered separately, indicating important differences. Periodontal disease resulted in a significant increase in Bacteroidetes and reductions in Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria. Porphyromonas abundance increased 2.7 times in periodontal disease, accompanied by increases in Bacteroides and Fusobacterium. It was predicted that aerobic respiratory processes are decreased in periodontal disease. Enrichment in fermentative processes and anaerobic glycolysis were suggestive of an anaerobic environment, also characterized by higher lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis. This study contributes to a better understanding of how periodontal disease modifies the oral microbiome and makes a prediction of the metabolic pathways that contribute to the inflammatory process observed in periodontal disease. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New insights on Veterinary Dentistry and Oral Surgery)
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14 pages, 2413 KiB  
Article
Evaluation of the Use of Platelet-Rich Fibrin Xenologous Membranes Derived from Bubaline Blood in Canine Periodontal Defects
by Poranee Banyatworakul, Thanaphum Osathanon, Chanin Kalpravidh, Prasit Pavasant and Nopadon Pirarat
Vet. Sci. 2021, 8(10), 210; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci8100210 - 28 Sep 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2189
Abstract
Periodontal disease is the most common oral disease in dogs. Platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) is widely utilized to facilitate soft and hard tissue healing and has been proposed in periodontal healing in small animal treatment. However, the quality and amount of autologous PRF is [...] Read more.
Periodontal disease is the most common oral disease in dogs. Platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) is widely utilized to facilitate soft and hard tissue healing and has been proposed in periodontal healing in small animal treatment. However, the quality and amount of autologous PRF is compromised in animals with systemic diseases. The present study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of xenologous bubaline blood-derived PRF (bPRF) on periodontal tissue healing in canine periodontal defects. Split-mouth design was employed in twenty dogs diagnosed with periodontal disease. The defects were divided randomly into two groups: the open-flap debridement (OFD)-treated group and the OFD with bPRF (OFD+bPRF) application group. Results demonstrated that gingival index and periodontal probing depth decreased significantly in the OFD+bPRF group compared with those treated with OFD alone. Application of bPRF in periodontal defects also promoted fibrous tissue formation, as confirmed by the marked increase in fibrosis score. bPRF application significantly increased COL1A1 and PDGFB mRNA levels at day 14 compared with the baseline. Taking this evidence together, bPRF provided a favorable therapeutic modality in canine periodontal defects. bPRF could be an alternative biomaterial for the treatment of periodontal defects in dogs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New insights on Veterinary Dentistry and Oral Surgery)
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14 pages, 9469 KiB  
Case Report
Application of Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT) as a Healing Aid after Extraction of Incisors in the Equine Odontoclastic Tooth Resorption and Hypercementosis Syndrome
by Kamil Górski, Elżbieta Stefanik, Andrzej Bereznowski, Izabela Polkowska and Bernard Turek
Vet. Sci. 2022, 9(1), 30; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci9010030 - 15 Jan 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 3355
Abstract
Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT) is a stress-free, relatively safe method supporting the treatment of many different diseases. Although it is widely used in human medicine (including dentistry), in veterinary medicine, especially in the treatment of horses, there are not many scientifically described and [...] Read more.
Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT) is a stress-free, relatively safe method supporting the treatment of many different diseases. Although it is widely used in human medicine (including dentistry), in veterinary medicine, especially in the treatment of horses, there are not many scientifically described and documented cases of its use. Equine Odontoclastic Tooth Resorption and Hypercementosis syndrome is a disease that affects older horses and significantly reduces their quality of life. The only effective treatment for this condition is extraction of the incisors. The described case compares the recovery process of the alveolar area after extraction of incisors during the course of EOTRH syndrome without and with the use of a chamber, in horses with the same clinical picture of the disease, of the same age, and living in the same conditions. According to the authors’ knowledge, the presented case describes the use of a chamber in equine dentistry for the first time. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New insights on Veterinary Dentistry and Oral Surgery)
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