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Special Issue "Bio-Monitoring of Marine and Fresh Water Toxins in Europe and North America"

A special issue of Toxins (ISSN 2072-6651). This special issue belongs to the section "Marine and Freshwater Toxins".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2018)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Luis M. Botana

Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Veterinary, University of Santiago of Compostela, 27002 Lugo, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Phone: 34982822233
Interests: pharmacology; analytical biochemistry; signal transduction; compound isolation
Guest Editor
Dr. Amparo Alfonso

Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Veterinary, University of Santiago of Compostela, Lugo 27002, Spain
E-Mail
Interests: marine toxins; cyanotoxins; mycotoxins; detection methods of toxins; mechanism of action of toxins; toxin effects
Guest Editor
Dr. Schonna R. Manning

UTEX Culture Collection of Algae, Department of Molecular Biosciences, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, 78712, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: natural products chemistry; harmful algae; algae blooms; analytical chemistry; biochemistry; molecular biology and metabolomics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue on “Bio-Monitoring of Marine and Fresh Water Toxins in Europe and North America” intends to cover several topics that have the attention of specialists in the field: New and fast methods to detect cyanotoxins and phycotoxins, their chemical variability, the geographical expansion of some of them and the ecology behind this, the toxicological implications and the legal requirements for water and seafood quality. To date, it has been very difficult to identify and link climate change with the presence of a type of toxin in a defined geographical area, especially because human eutrophication and water pollution goes along with the chemical profiles. The expansion of cylindrospermopsin, or the recent appearance of tetrodotoxin as a seafood problem highlights the complexity of the topic. We expect this Special Issue will help clarify the complex science of bio-monitoring cyanotoxins and marine toxins.

Prof. Dr. Luis M. Botana
Dr. Amparo Alfonso
Dr. Schonna R. Manning
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Toxins is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • cyanotoxins
  • phycotoxins
  • biofilm
  • bentic cyanobacteria
  • climate change
  • eutrophication
  • bio-monitoring
  • detection

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessEditor’s ChoiceArticle Analysis of Microcystins in Cyanobacterial Blooms from Freshwater Bodies in England
Received: 29 November 2017 / Revised: 2 January 2018 / Accepted: 8 January 2018 / Published: 11 January 2018
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (7713 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Cyanobacterial blooms in freshwater bodies in England are currently monitored reactively, with samples containing more than 20,000 cells/mL of potentially toxin-producing species by light microscopy resulting in action by the water body owner. Whilst significantly reducing the risk of microcystin exposure, there is [...] Read more.
Cyanobacterial blooms in freshwater bodies in England are currently monitored reactively, with samples containing more than 20,000 cells/mL of potentially toxin-producing species by light microscopy resulting in action by the water body owner. Whilst significantly reducing the risk of microcystin exposure, there is little data describing the levels of these toxins present in cyanobacterial blooms. This study focused on the quantitative LC-MS/MS analysis of microcystins in freshwater samples, collected across England during 2016 and found to contain potentially toxin-producing cyanobacteria. More than 50% of samples contained quantifiable concentrations of microcystins, with approximately 13% exceeding the WHO medium health threshold of 20 μg/L. Toxic samples were confirmed over a nine-month period, with a clear increase in toxins during late summer, but with no apparent geographical patterns. No statistical relationships were found between total toxin concentrations and environmental parameters. Complex toxin profiles were determined and profile clusters were unrelated to cyanobacterial species, although a dominance of MC-RR was determined in water samples from sites associated with lower rainfall. 100% of samples with toxins above the 20 μg/L limit contained cell densities above 20,000 cells/mL or cyanobacterial scum, showing the current regime is suitable for public health. Conversely, with only 18% of cell density threshold samples having total microcystins above 20 μg/L, there is the potential for reactive water closures to unnecessarily impact upon the socio-economics of the local population. In the future, routine analysis of bloom samples by LC-MS/MS would provide a beneficial confirmatory approach to the current microscopic assessment, aiding both public health and the needs of water users and industry. Full article
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