Special Issue "Removal of Cyanobacteria and Cyanotoxins in Waters"

A special issue of Toxins (ISSN 2072-6651). This special issue belongs to the section "Marine and Freshwater Toxins".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Albert Serrà
Website
Guest Editor
Empa - Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Thun, Switzerland
Interests: electrochemistry; electrodeposition; materials science; heterogeneous catalysis; photocatalysis; water decontamination; biotemplating; electrocatalysis; nanomaterials; energy
Prof. Dr. Elvira Gómez
Website
Guest Editor
Grup d’Electrodeposició de Capes Primes i Nanoestructures (GE-CPN), Departament de Ciència de Materials i Química Física, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès, 1, E-08028 Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain and Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (IN2UB), Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain
Interests: electrochemistry; electrodeposition; nanomaterials; magnetic materials; ionic liquids; biotemplating; electrocatalysis; heterogeneous catalysis; photocatalysis; water decontamination; energy
Dr. Laëtitia V.S. Philippe
Website
Guest Editor
Empa - Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Dübendorf, Switzerland
Interests: electrochemistry, electroplating; photoelectrochemistry; catalysis; materials processing; biotemplating; natural lithography; energy
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Harmful cyanobacterial algal blooms and cyanotoxins currently pose a major threat to global society, exceeding local, national, and state interests due to their extremely destructive effects on the environment and human health. In the near future, the formation of harmful cyanobacterial algal blooms and, in turn, cyanotoxins is expected to become widespread, driven by anthropological and eutrophication activities such as water pollution and promoted by escalating global temperatures. In developing countries, this adverse situation is aggravated by rapid industrialization, which generally increases demands for energy and lenient antipollution regulations that can worsen existing contamination. The global context of the threat thus urges the innovation of simple, sustainable, low-cost strategies and technologies for water decontamination that can be readily implemented worldwide.

In response, this Special Issue aims to highlight novel research on the development or optimization of new technologies or strategies for efficient, practical ways of circumventing the drawbacks of conventional treatments used to combat the spread of cyanobacterial blooms and their products. Indeed, such research paves the way for securing the safety of global water resources. Studies addressing any other aspects of relevance or reviews related to the removal of cyanotoxins or cyanobacteria are also welcome

Dr. Albert Serrà
Prof. Dr. Elvira Gómez
Dr. Laëtitia V.S. Philippe
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Toxins is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • cyanobacteria
  • harmful cyanobacterial algal blooms
  • cyanotoxins
  • water decontamination
  • advanced oxidation process (AOP)
  • photocatalysis
  • microcystins
  • biodegradation

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Delayed Release of Intracellular Microcystin Following Partial Oxidation of Cultured and Naturally Occurring Cyanobacteria
Toxins 2020, 12(5), 335; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxins12050335 - 20 May 2020
Abstract
Oxidation processes can provide an effective barrier to eliminate cyanotoxins by damaging cyanobacteria cell membranes, releasing intracellular cyanotoxins, and subsequently oxidizing these toxins (now in extracellular form) based on published reaction kinetics. In this work, cyanobacteria cells from two natural blooms (from the [...] Read more.
Oxidation processes can provide an effective barrier to eliminate cyanotoxins by damaging cyanobacteria cell membranes, releasing intracellular cyanotoxins, and subsequently oxidizing these toxins (now in extracellular form) based on published reaction kinetics. In this work, cyanobacteria cells from two natural blooms (from the United States and Canada) and a laboratory-cultured Microcystis aeruginosa strain were treated with chlorine, monochloramine, chlorine dioxide, ozone, and potassium permanganate. The release of microcystin was measured immediately after oxidation (t ≤ 20 min), and following oxidant residual quenching (stagnation times = 96 or 168 h). Oxidant exposures (CT) were determined resulting in complete release of intracellular microcystin following chlorine (21 mg-min/L), chloramine (72 mg-min/L), chlorine dioxide (58 mg-min/L), ozone (4.1 mg-min/L), and permanganate (391 mg-min/L). Required oxidant exposures using indigenous cells were greater than lab-cultured Microcystis. Following partial oxidation of cells (oxidant exposures ≤ CT values cited above), additional intracellular microcystin and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) were released while the samples remained stagnant in the absence of an oxidant (>96 h after quenching). The delayed release of microcystin from partially oxidized cells has implications for drinking water treatment as these cells may be retained on a filter surface or in solids and continue to slowly release cyanotoxins and other metabolites into the finished water. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Removal of Cyanobacteria and Cyanotoxins in Waters)
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