Service Ecosystems: Resilience and Sustainability

A special issue of Systems (ISSN 2079-8954). This special issue belongs to the section "Systems Practice in Social Science".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2024 | Viewed by 7101

Special Issue Editors

Faculty of Automation and Computer Science, University Politehnica Bucharest, Splaiul Independenţei 313, 060042 Bucharest, Romania
Interests: systems engineering; visual analytics and smart service design; digital design of services; computational intelligence; mobile robotics; IoT innovation ecosystems
School of Engineering, ZHAW Zurich University of Applied Sciences, 8400 Winterthur, Switzerland
Interests: data-driven service engineering; quantitative models; industrial services; servitization; service ecosystems

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are living in a world with many unknowns and challenges. The high degree of volatility in business systems in recent years was unexpected and organizations were not adequately well prepared. There were unforeseen bottlenecks and markets were determined by the (non-)availability of resources rather than by demand.

Against this backdrop, business ecosystems can provide a remedy. We have technology that must work for the people’s benefit. We must continue to learn how to intertwine science, technology, and innovation with our fast-growing service-oriented economy, where we deal with people-centric interactions. These interactions are more and more mediated by technology. These interactions are described in complex actor networks: service ecosystems. These interactions develop in service systems that integrate people, technology, and shared information. These interactions are more and more “informed” by rich, data-driven processes.

To enhance the ability to absorb shocks, as well as to quickly adapt to a dramatically changing situation (through resourcefulness, adaptability, and flexibility), resilience and sustainability are the two concepts widely used in various domains to describe the process of adaptation to the current conditions. 

Therefore, this Special Issue intends to concentrate the evaluation of these two concepts around the service ecosystems perspective, to strongly support the ability to adapt. Through their integration of dynamic capabilities and resources, ecosystems can provide a basis for the dynamic rearrangement of existing resources and innovatively advance the formulation of new value propositions for our society.

This Special Issue seeks original contributions on both theoretical and practical aspects related to the following themes, among others:

  • Convergent value co creation processes to support resilience and sustainability in service ecosystems.
  • The formulation of new value propositions in service ecosystems.
  • The (sustainable) value of data in supporting innovative smart service design.
  • Intelligence augmentation as a tool fostering complex resilience and sustainability processes.
  • The democratization of knowledge in analytics and smart service design
  • Smart visualizations to evaluate complex resilience and sustainability activities in service ecosystems.
  • The emergence and institutionalization of new or extended ecosystems for resilience and sustainability.
References:

[1] Walletzký, L., Carrubbo, L., Badr, N.G., Dragoicea, M., Toli, A.M. and Badawi, S. (2023), "Reconfiguring the service system for resilience: lessons learned in the higher education context", Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, Vol. ahead-of-print No. ahead-of-print. DOI: 10.1108/JBIM-09-2022-0426

[2] Polese, F., Dragoicea, M., Carrubbo, L., Walletzký, L., Why Service Science matters in approaching a "resilient" Society, ITM Web Conf. Volume 38, 2021, International Conference on Exploring Service Science (IESS 2.1), DOI: 10.1051/itmconf/20213802001

[3] Conz, E., Magnani, G. (2020). A dynamic perspective on the resilience of firms: A systematic literature review and a framework for future research. European Management Journal, 38(3), 400-412.

[4] Meierhofer, J., & Stucki, M. (2022). Sustainable Value Optimization by Smart Services along the Customer Lifecycle. 5th Smart Services Summit - Smart Services Creating Sustainability. 5th Smart Services Summit, Zürich.

Prof. Dr. Monica Drǎgoicea
Dr. Jürg Meierhofer
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • resource integration in service ecosystems
  • sustainable value creation
  • resourcefulness, adaptability, and flexibility in service ecosystems
  • analytics and smart service design
  • institutionalization and service ecosystems

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

22 pages, 4757 KiB  
Article
Dynamic Evolution Characteristics and Drivers of Tourism-Related Ecological Security in the Beijing–Tianjin–Hebei Region
Systems 2023, 11(11), 533; https://doi.org/10.3390/systems11110533 - 02 Nov 2023
Viewed by 1132
Abstract
Revealing the characteristics of the spatial and temporal evolution of regional tourism-related ecological security and exploring its driving factors are of great theoretical and practical value to promoting the coordinated and sustainable development of the tourism economy and the ecological environment. Taking the [...] Read more.
Revealing the characteristics of the spatial and temporal evolution of regional tourism-related ecological security and exploring its driving factors are of great theoretical and practical value to promoting the coordinated and sustainable development of the tourism economy and the ecological environment. Taking the Beijing–Tianjin–Hebei region as a case study, this study constructed a tourism-related ecological security evaluation index system based on the DPSIR theoretical framework. The tourism-related ecological security index was measured from 2011 to 2022 and its spatiotemporal characteristics and dynamic evolutionary process were analyzed. Finally, the panel quantile regression model was used to analyze its driving factors. The results show that: (1) in time, the average value of tourism-related ecological security fluctuates and rises, and the differences between the units show a convergent trend, which is mainly manifested in the catching-up effect from low-value cities to higher-value cities; (2) in space, Beijing and its southeastern cities have a high level of tourism-related ecological security, and although the study area is mainly at the less secure level, it is developing continuously and progressively; (3) in terms of the dynamic evolution characteristics, the type transfer of tourism-related ecological security has certain “path dependence” and “self-locking” effects, often occurring between neighboring levels, and the type transfer under the influence of different neighborhoods has significant differences; (4) in terms of driving factors, environmental pollution has a significant inhibitory effect on the level of tourism-related ecological security, and the level of economic development has the largest positive marginal effect on tourism-related ecological security, while other influencing factors such as the level of tourism development have certain differences in terms of their positive role in the promotion of the level of tourism-related ecological security. This study can provide a reference for decisionmakers to promote ecological protection and high-quality tourism development in the Beijing–Tianjin–Hebei region. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Service Ecosystems: Resilience and Sustainability)
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26 pages, 6545 KiB  
Article
Coupling Landscape Connectedness, Ecosystem Service Value, and Resident Welfare in Xining City, Western China
Systems 2023, 11(10), 512; https://doi.org/10.3390/systems11100512 - 13 Oct 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1238
Abstract
Landscape connectedness, ecosystem service value (ESV), and resident welfare are intricately interconnected, and understanding their relationships is crucial for promoting regional sustainable development. Utilizing six stages of land use data from 1995, 2000, 2005, 2010, 2015, and 2020 in Xining City, Qinghai Province, [...] Read more.
Landscape connectedness, ecosystem service value (ESV), and resident welfare are intricately interconnected, and understanding their relationships is crucial for promoting regional sustainable development. Utilizing six stages of land use data from 1995, 2000, 2005, 2010, 2015, and 2020 in Xining City, Qinghai Province, this study identified landscape connectedness changes by landscape pattern indices, calculated ecosystem service value by the equivalent factor method, and quantified residents’ well-being by comprehensive evaluation indices. To investigate the coupled and coordinated states among the three, a coupling coordination model is adopted. Furthermore, the relative development degree model is employed to reveal the relative developmental level of the three, clarify the lagging factors in their coupling coordination. The gray relational model is employed to identify key factors affecting the coupling mechanism. Key findings include the following: (1) The development trend of landscape types was moving toward diversification and balance, and the total value of ecosystem services has been declining. The comprehensive level of resident welfare has increased annually, but the structure has changed. (2) The coupling relationship among landscape connectedness, ecosystem service value, and resident welfare is strong and has remained at a high correlation level but has been in a state of discord. (3) The main constraint of the discord in the early stage was resident welfare, but the constraining factors in the later stage shifted to ecosystem services and landscape connectedness. The largest patch index and water resource supply were the key influencing factors in the system coupling mechanism. The research findings can provide a reference for the sustainable development of Xining City, regional land use policies, and ecological intervention planning. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Service Ecosystems: Resilience and Sustainability)
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21 pages, 2716 KiB  
Article
Subject Embedding, Relationship Interaction, and Resource Integration: The Value Co-Creation Mechanism in Rural Communities
Systems 2023, 11(10), 507; https://doi.org/10.3390/systems11100507 - 08 Oct 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1288
Abstract
Globalization and urbanization have reshaped the way that service ecosystem subjects interact with each other in rural communities, providing conditions and possibilities for realizing value co-creation in rural communities. Therefore, this study selected rural communities in Guiyang City, China, as research subjects and [...] Read more.
Globalization and urbanization have reshaped the way that service ecosystem subjects interact with each other in rural communities, providing conditions and possibilities for realizing value co-creation in rural communities. Therefore, this study selected rural communities in Guiyang City, China, as research subjects and explored the value co-creation mechanism in rural communities from the perspective of service ecosystems. The authors construct a theoretical framework encompassing “value co-creation conditions, value co-creation processes, and value co-creation results”. The study found that the core mechanism in the process of value co-creation is “subject embedding, relationship interaction, and resource integration”. At the macro level, resource sharing is achieved through complex and heterogeneous interactions among multiple subjects, under the influence of institutions, policies, and cultures. At the meso level, organizations complement each other’s resources through the cooperation and empowerment of other actors horizontally, under the influence of structure, function, and rules. At the micro level, individuals optimize resources through cooperative and empowering interactions, under the influence of motivations and value preferences. Finally, the integration of individual, organizational, and overall values constitutes public values, under the joint cross-level action of institutional and cultural elements. This study provides a new theoretical perspective for exploring the value co-creation mechanism in rural communities and provides important practical insights for promoting the sustainable development of rural communities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Service Ecosystems: Resilience and Sustainability)
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19 pages, 2263 KiB  
Article
Evaluating Collaboration in a Translational Research Ecosystem
Systems 2023, 11(10), 503; https://doi.org/10.3390/systems11100503 - 03 Oct 2023
Viewed by 1298
Abstract
A core challenge of a multidisciplinary and multi-organizational translational research program is to set up and promote collaboration between researchers, labs, and organizations. Although the literature has studied and provided guidelines for collaboration, little has been written on how to evaluate it in [...] Read more.
A core challenge of a multidisciplinary and multi-organizational translational research program is to set up and promote collaboration between researchers, labs, and organizations. Although the literature has studied and provided guidelines for collaboration, little has been written on how to evaluate it in large research projects and in a practical way. This study aims to identify dimensions and barriers to evaluating and leveraging collaboration in a large translational research ecosystem related to developing phytotherapy-based cancer treatments. By applying the Collaboration Evaluation and Improvement Framework (CEIF), our paper adds value by developing a methodological design for evaluation, incorporating mixed data in a real research ecosystem. Empirical findings provide support for applying the assessment approach and show that a research project’s sustainability depends on several collaboration factors and barriers at the socio-technical, management, operational, and institutional levels. Research results provide valuable insights for managing and improving collaborative efforts in large research groups, by anticipating collaboration issues with actionable and opportune strategies that can enhance the planning process, ecosystem performance, sustainability, research outcomes, and the program’s overall success. As a result, monitoring governance, management, leadership, and social relationships throughout the different phases of a translational research program is crucial in assessing and promoting collaboration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Service Ecosystems: Resilience and Sustainability)
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23 pages, 4055 KiB  
Article
Measuring the Development Capability of the Innovation Ecosystem from a Quadruple Helix Perspective—An Empirical Analysis Based on Panel Data for Chinese High-Tech Industries
Systems 2023, 11(7), 338; https://doi.org/10.3390/systems11070338 - 02 Jul 2023
Viewed by 1040
Abstract
With the rapid development of high-tech industries, the research perspective of industrial innovation has gradually evolved from the innovation system to innovation ecosystem. Whether the innovation ecosystem of China’s high-tech industry can achieve the benign evolution and development of the system under the [...] Read more.
With the rapid development of high-tech industries, the research perspective of industrial innovation has gradually evolved from the innovation system to innovation ecosystem. Whether the innovation ecosystem of China’s high-tech industry can achieve the benign evolution and development of the system under the new global pattern has become a real issue. Based on the perspective of the four-helix innovation model, in this study we construct an index system of the industrial innovation ecosystem development and designs a framework system of the industrial innovation ecosystem development capability, including the coordinated development capability, evolutionary development capability, and sustainable development capability at three levels. We construct measurement models of different capability dimensions and multi-dimensionally analyses of the regional development differences and change trends of each capability dimension of the system. The results show that the coordinated development capability of China’s high-tech industrial innovation ecosystem is poor, which inhibits the comprehensive capability of the system’s development to a certain extent. Although the evolutionary and sustainable development capabilities fluctuate greatly and have significant regional differences, they are measured at a better level and thereby contribute to the development of the system. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Service Ecosystems: Resilience and Sustainability)
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