Special Issue "Trade Policy and Macroeconomic Impacts on Agricultural Sustainability"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Agriculture, Food and Wildlife".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Michael Reed
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Agricultural Economics, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, USA
Interests: international agricultural trade; macroeconomic policies and agriculture; commodity price dynamics
Prof. Dr. Sayed Saghaian
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Agricultural Economics, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, USA
Interests: international trade; macroeconomics linkages in agricultural economics; agribusiness management; food safety; price analysis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This special issue investigates the nexus of trade and macroeconomic policies relating to agricultural sustainability. Economic policies must be designed to positively impact the globally relevant issues of climate change, water scarcity, food insecurity, poverty alleviation, environmental degradation, and sustainability of resources (water, soil, and nitrogen fertilizer). Sustainability is a particularly crucial factor in policy formulation and analysis while conflicting economic, environmental, and social objectives move toward a resolution. We welcome manuscripts investigating agricultural sustainability as it relates to: the interaction of agricultural trade and environmental policies, the impacts of the liberalization of specific agricultural trade, the environmentally friendly technology transfer in agriculture, free trade agreements, exchange rate changes, and biofuel policies. These polices have important effects on the trade and prices of environmentally sensitive goods. Papers selected for this Special Issue are subject to rigorous peer review and streamlined for rapid, widespread dissemination of the results.

Prof. Dr. Michael Reed
Prof. Dr. Sayed Saghaian
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • agriculture
  • climate change
  • environment
  • trade
  • policy
  • technology transfer
  • energy

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
The Effects of AfCFTA on Food Security Sustainability: An Analysis of the Cereals Trade in the SADC Region
Sustainability 2020, 12(4), 1419; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12041419 - 14 Feb 2020
Abstract
The signing of the African Continental Free Trade Agreement (AfCFTA) has stimulated a lot of trade potential in Africa that could see the continent significantly improving its intra-trade levels, thereby boosting the economic welfare of Africans. In light of food security sustainability in [...] Read more.
The signing of the African Continental Free Trade Agreement (AfCFTA) has stimulated a lot of trade potential in Africa that could see the continent significantly improving its intra-trade levels, thereby boosting the economic welfare of Africans. In light of food security sustainability in the Southern African Development Community (SADC) region, this paper employed the World Integrated Trade Solution, Software for Market Analysis and Restrictions on Trade (WITS-SMART) simulation model to assess the potential effects of the AfCFTA on trade in cereals. Cereals have been regarded as the most critical component of food security. The model indicated trading partners for each of the 15 SADC countries, their level of trade creation, trade diversion, consumer surplus, welfare and revenue effects of any regional trade agreement. The results indicated that the AfCFTA will only lead to positive outcomes in four (Angola, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Madagascar and Namibia) of the fifteen SADC countries, with the rest remaining unchanged. In general, previously closed economies, that is, economies which were not part of a free trade agreement (FTA) or a deeper arrangement will stand to gain more than open economies because they are already opened up at the free trade level, which is equivalent to the AfCFTA. Thus, as far as cereals and food security is concerned, the AfCFTA will add minimal value. However, the overall value gains are likely to be greater when all food categories are included in the simulations. In general, the study recommends that African countries should deepen their integration levels to perhaps common markets where production factors, that is, labour and capital, become mobile. This will have multiplier effects in improving continental food security sustainability from a trade perspective. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Trade Policy and Macroeconomic Impacts on Agricultural Sustainability)
Open AccessArticle
Assessing Impacts of CAP Subsidies on Financial Performance of Enterprises in Slovak Republic
Sustainability 2020, 12(3), 948; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12030948 - 28 Jan 2020
Abstract
Sustainability is a particularly crucial factor in policy formulation and analysis, including in the EU’s common agricultural policy. The common agricultural policy, through a subsidy policy, has caused a significant proportion of public funding to flow to agricultural subsidies, so it is appropriate [...] Read more.
Sustainability is a particularly crucial factor in policy formulation and analysis, including in the EU’s common agricultural policy. The common agricultural policy, through a subsidy policy, has caused a significant proportion of public funding to flow to agricultural subsidies, so it is appropriate to focus on the effect of these subsidies in the context of the sustainable development of EU agriculture. The impact of agricultural subsidies on business performance is of interest to policy makers. In agrarian practice, insufficient attention is paid to the legal form of agricultural performance, so our economic analysis focused on this area of research. The aim of the paper was to evaluate the effect of financial support in the form of subsidies resulting from the EU’s common agricultural policy and to verify its connection with the performance of agricultural enterprises in terms of the legal form in the context of sustainable development of the agricultural sector in Slovakia. No statistically significant linear correlation was found between farms’ performance results and the volume of subsidies per hectare of agricultural land for each legal form throughout the reporting period. In each analyzed year, business companies achieved a better overall assessment than agricultural cooperatives based on monitored parameters. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Trade Policy and Macroeconomic Impacts on Agricultural Sustainability)
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Open AccessArticle
Analysis of Agricultural Commodities Prices with New Bayesian Model Combination Schemes
Sustainability 2019, 11(19), 5305; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11195305 - 26 Sep 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
In the described research three agricultural commodities (i.e., wheat, corn and soybean) spot prices were analyzed. In particular, one-month ahead forecasts were built with techniques like dynamic model averaging (DMA), the median probability model and Bayesian model averaging. The common features of these [...] Read more.
In the described research three agricultural commodities (i.e., wheat, corn and soybean) spot prices were analyzed. In particular, one-month ahead forecasts were built with techniques like dynamic model averaging (DMA), the median probability model and Bayesian model averaging. The common features of these methods are time-varying parameters approach toward estimation of regression coefficients and dealing with model uncertainty. In other words, starting with multiple potentially important explanatory variables, various component linear regression models can be constructed. Then, from these models an averaged forecast can be constructed. Moreover, the mentioned techniques can be easily modified from model averaging into a model selection approach. Considering as benchmark models, time-varying parameters regression with all considered potential price drivers, historical average, ARIMA (Auto-Regressive Integrated Moving Average) and the naïve forecast models, the Diebold–Mariano test suggested that DMA is an interesting alternative model, if forecast accuracy is the aim. Secondly, the interpretation of time-varying weights ascribed to component models containing a given variable suggested that economic development of emerging BRIC economies (Brazil, Russia, India and China) is recently one of the most important drivers of agricultural commodities prices. The analysis was made on the monthly data between 1976 and 2016. The initial price drivers were various fundamental, macroeconomic and financial factors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Trade Policy and Macroeconomic Impacts on Agricultural Sustainability)
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Open AccessArticle
Does FDI Promote or Inhibit the High-Quality Development of Agriculture in China? An Agricultural GTFP Perspective
Sustainability 2019, 11(17), 4620; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11174620 - 25 Aug 2019
Abstract
This paper innovatively brings the undesirable output of agricultural carbon emission into the agricultural Total Factor Productivity (TFP) accounting framework as a measure of Green Total Factor Productivity (GTFP) and uses the Slack-based Measure and Malmquist-Luenberger (SBM-ML) index method to measure the agricultural [...] Read more.
This paper innovatively brings the undesirable output of agricultural carbon emission into the agricultural Total Factor Productivity (TFP) accounting framework as a measure of Green Total Factor Productivity (GTFP) and uses the Slack-based Measure and Malmquist-Luenberger (SBM-ML) index method to measure the agricultural GTFP of 24 provinces in China from 2004 to 2016. Further, the two-step system generalized moment method (GMM) is adopted to reveal the effect of agricultural (Foreign Direct Investment) FDI on the growth of agricultural GTFP and various subitems. We find that the average annual growth rate of agricultural GTFP is 3.1%, and its contribution rate to agricultural growth is 52%; the growth of agricultural GTFP shows that the progress of agricultural technology is accompanied by the deterioration of agricultural technical efficiency; the agricultural GTFP in the Eastern region, the Central region and the Western region increases in a stepped-up form, with an annual growth rate of 3.1%, 3.3% and 3.4%, respectively. Agricultural FDI has a significant promoting effect on agricultural GTFP and subitems, however, it has an inverted U-shaped feature in the long term. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Trade Policy and Macroeconomic Impacts on Agricultural Sustainability)
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Open AccessArticle
Coffee Output Reaction to Climate Change and Commodity Price Volatility: The Nigeria Experience
Sustainability 2019, 11(13), 3503; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11133503 - 26 Jun 2019
Abstract
Empirical evidence is lacking on the nexus between coffee commodity output, climate change, and commodity price volatility of Africa’s most populous country, Nigeria, and other developing countries. To fill this gap, this study analyzed the reaction of coffee output to climate change and [...] Read more.
Empirical evidence is lacking on the nexus between coffee commodity output, climate change, and commodity price volatility of Africa’s most populous country, Nigeria, and other developing countries. To fill this gap, this study analyzed the reaction of coffee output to climate change and commodity price volatility. We used secondary data from 1961 to 2015 from reliable sources for Nigeria. The study adopted generalized autoregressive conditional heteroscedasticity (GARCH), autoregressive conditional heteroscedasticity (ARCH), and fully modified ordinary least square (FMOLS) in analysis of coffee output reaction to climate change and commodity price volatility. The findings show that coffee output in Nigeria is influenced by climate change and the international commodity price of coffee. The study demonstrates the potential benefits of improving coffee output and export through climate mitigation and adaptation measures and revival of agricultural commodity marketing in Nigeria and other developing countries. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Trade Policy and Macroeconomic Impacts on Agricultural Sustainability)
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