Special Issue "Sustainable Tourism and Hospitality Management"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Tom Farrington
Website
Guest Editor
School of Social Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh, United Kingdom
Interests: sustainability; ethics; hospitality; tourism; indigeneity; management; critical management; aesthetics; politics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Despite increasing public and private awareness of the necessity of prioritising sustainable business practices (Scott, 2015; UNESCO, 2018), alongside a significant increase in related scholarship (Coles, Fenclova & Dinan, 2013; Farrington et al., 2017), sustainable hospitality and tourism remains a “neglected [area] of enquiry[…] still in its infancy” (Melissen, 2013, pp. 819-821). Achieving sustainable business outcomes thus continues to pose significant problems and gaps for hospitality practitioners and scholars, who note the “teasing paradox” of pursuing both private profit and public good in hospitality and tourism (Jones, Hillier & Comfort, 2016, p. 36). Current research into the outcomes of sustainable industry policies and practices tends to measure relationships between the perceived social responsibilities of the business and financial performance (Farrington et al., 2017), thereby neglecting the realities and external social and environmental impacts of sustainable operations.

The purpose of this Special Issue is to deepen understanding of the theory and practice of sustainable hospitality and tourism, both in providing foundational and philosophical reflections on the principles and conceptualisation of sustainability in hospitality and tourism, and offering clear examples of the often messy reality of doing the right thing in business.

This Special Issue seeks papers that address the links between hospitality and tourism industry policies and practices and sustainable outcomes and goals. High-quality research papers are welcomed on various aspects of hospitality in clear relation to sustainability.

Suggested topics (which should be clearly situated in hospitality and tourism contexts) include, but are not limited to:

  • Business impacts upon the natural environment
  • Business impacts and indigenous populations
  • Consumer benefit from and response to sustainable practices
  • Corporate social entrepreneurship
  • Disaster: planning, management, and response
  • Green hospitality and tourism practices (e.g., energy efficiency, waste management, environmental stewardship)
  • Holistic approaches to sustainability
  • Human rights and business practices (e.g., land rights, accountability, climate change, refugee crises)
  • Independent/external assurance standards for sustainability reporting: practices and outcomes
  • Innovation, technology, and sustainability
  • Social enterprise in theory and practice
  • Societal wellbeing and social value
  • Sustainable Development Goals
  • Sustainable employment practices and outcomes (e.g., working conditions, inclusivity, wellbeing, balance)
  • Sustainable marketing and branding
  • Sustainability reporting: policies, practices, and outcomes
  • Sustainable supply chain management
  • The philosophy and/or ethics of sustainability, business policy, and practices

References:

Coles, T., Fenclova, E. and Dinan, C. (2013), “Tourism and corporate social responsibility: a critical review and research agenda, Tourism Management Perspectives, 6, pp. 122-141.

Farrington, T., Curran, R., Gori, K., O’Gorman, K.D. and Queenan, C.J., 2017. Corporate social responsibility: reviewed, rated, revised. International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management29(1), pp.30-47.

Jones, P., Hillier, D. and Comfort, D., 2016. Sustainability in the hospitality industry: Some personal reflections on corporate challenges and research agendas. International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management28(1), pp.36-67.

Melissen, F., 2013. Sustainable hospitality: a meaningful notion?. Journal of Sustainable Tourism21(6), pp.810-824.

Scott, W., 2015. Public Understanding of Sustainable Development: Some Implications for Education. International Journal of Environmental And Science Education10(2), pp.235-246.

UNESCO., 2018. UNESCO and Sustainable Development Goals. Retrieved October 30, 2018, from https://en.unesco.org/sdgs

Dr. Tom Farrington
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • sustainable development
  • hospitality
  • tourism
  • environmental impact
  • social impact
  • human rights
  • CSR
  • sustainability reporting
  • indigenous communities

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Ecotourism in China, Misuse or Genuine Development? An Analysis Based on Map Browser Results
Sustainability 2019, 11(18), 4997; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11184997 - 12 Sep 2019
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 901
Abstract
Ecotourism is considered to be an effective means of promoting nature conservation and sustainable development in less developed regions. However, its widespread adoption may be the result of a misunderstanding due to confusion about definitions and interpretations. Using web map browsers, we assessed [...] Read more.
Ecotourism is considered to be an effective means of promoting nature conservation and sustainable development in less developed regions. However, its widespread adoption may be the result of a misunderstanding due to confusion about definitions and interpretations. Using web map browsers, we assessed the distribution pattern of ecotourism sites in both number and density in the 31 provinces of mainland China, and found that it positively correlated with gross domestic products (GDP) and population size, showing spatial dynamics similar to the general tourism model. However, negative-weak or no correlation at all was found with the presence and size of nature variables such as protected areas. These results support previous suspicions that the term ecotourism and its associated concept may be misused in China and that the regions that could benefit the most from this form of tourism have yet to properly develop it. Although this pattern could reflect a huge demand for genuine ecotourism, we recommend that China, to achieve its ambitious sustainable development goals, adapt ecotourism policies in its environmental and socio-cultural context, manage them with a trans-disciplinary expert board, and regulate its market by introducing a rigorous admittance system with continuous monitoring and evaluation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Tourism and Hospitality Management)
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Open AccessArticle
Examining the Moderating Effects of Work–Life Balance between Human Resource Practices and Intention to Stay
Sustainability 2019, 11(17), 4585; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11174585 - 23 Aug 2019
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1427
Abstract
Offering services to clients by staff is a major feature of the hotel industry. Therefore, maintaining high-quality and stable services is critical for hotels to stay competitive. As for hotel human resource management, how to effectively increase employee retention is crucial because it [...] Read more.
Offering services to clients by staff is a major feature of the hotel industry. Therefore, maintaining high-quality and stable services is critical for hotels to stay competitive. As for hotel human resource management, how to effectively increase employee retention is crucial because it not only enhances organizational performance but also reduces personnel cost. In this study, the researchers used structural equation modeling to explore the relationship between job embeddedness, organizational commitment, and intention to stay in tourist hotel interns. Furthermore, work–life balance was used as the moderating variable between organizational commitment and intention to stay. The study subjects were interns who had completed between half and one year of an internship at a tourist hotel and were going to graduate from the school upon completing the internship. The results indicated that job embeddedness has a significant and positive effect on organizational commitment and intention to stay whereas organizational commitment mediates the relationships between job embeddedness and intention to stay. In addition, work–life balance moderates interns’ intention to stay. This study provides the hotel industry with useful management guidelines for retaining employees and improving competitiveness. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Tourism and Hospitality Management)
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Open AccessArticle
Proposal of Value for Customer of Spas: Expectations of Spa Patients and Tourist in Polish Spas
Sustainability 2019, 11(13), 3598; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11133598 - 29 Jun 2019
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 995
Abstract
Literature on the trends of health tourism development has proven that it is becoming one of the most important tourism activities. With the growing popularity of this form of tourism, the structure of the needs of tourists and spa patients is simultaneously changing. [...] Read more.
Literature on the trends of health tourism development has proven that it is becoming one of the most important tourism activities. With the growing popularity of this form of tourism, the structure of the needs of tourists and spa patients is simultaneously changing. This article presents the results of self-research carried out in Polish spa resorts based on a sample of 753 patients and spa tourists. The purpose of the research carried out was the development of a value proposition for the client of a spa enterprise as an element of a business model. At the same time, this paper points to the need to base spa activity on the values of sustainable development through key spa resources in the form of a therapeutic climate and natural raw materials applied in spa therapy. The key values for patients and spa tourists are the improvement of health with natural therapeutic resources, recreation in a place with a healing climate, achieving the effect of the treatment, the development of cultural activities, the possibility of taking care of a child during treatment, and the introduction of a psychologist and leisure animator. The mentioned features may become the basis for building a business model of spa enterprises to adapt the value propositions of a client in their business models to the needs demonstrated by the beneficiaries of these values. The problem raised in the article requires a simultaneous consideration of the principles of sustainable development in relation to the natural resources used in spa therapy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Tourism and Hospitality Management)
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Open AccessArticle
Residents’ Perceptions and Satisfaction toward Tourism Development: A Case Study of Petra Region, Jordan
Sustainability 2019, 11(7), 1907; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11071907 - 30 Mar 2019
Cited by 16 | Viewed by 2011
Abstract
This study investigates whether local residents’ sociodemographics and community attachment can influence their perceptions toward the impact of tourism (economic, environmental, and sociocultural effects) and, further, whether these perceptions influence their satisfaction with local tourism management. The perceptions of 467 residents were surveyed [...] Read more.
This study investigates whether local residents’ sociodemographics and community attachment can influence their perceptions toward the impact of tourism (economic, environmental, and sociocultural effects) and, further, whether these perceptions influence their satisfaction with local tourism management. The perceptions of 467 residents were surveyed from six communities in the region of Petra, Jordan. The results of a regression analysis indicate that the respondents’ sociodemographics and community attachment influence their perceptions of the impacts of tourism. Gender and distance from tourist sites are found to be very important factors that influence local residents’ perceptions. In addition, the perceived economic impact is the most important aspect for these respondents, and perceived negative impacts do not significantly influence their satisfaction. Suggestions for future studies in the region and possible implications are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Tourism and Hospitality Management)
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