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Power Electronics for Renewable Energy Systems

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Energy Sustainability".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2020) | Viewed by 25053

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor

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Guest Editor
Department of Electrical Engineering and Automation, Aalto University, 02150 Espoo, Finland
Interests: power electronics; switch mode power supplies; EMC; power factor correction

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Power electronics is a key technology for use of renewable power generation in our societies. These devices convert electricity from one stage to the other stage, which leads to a power electronic-based power system. By this assumption, several technical challenges will be appeared in power grids, regarding the reliability and stability of grid under high penetration of power electronic-based power generators. To meet these challenges in future grids, a new research platform is needed for design and test of power electronic-based generators and their integration with the power grid.

This special issue aims to explore the new strategies for overcoming the technical challenges of grid integration of renewable energy systems, such as synchronization of interfaced converters with power grid, operation and control of different power converters in power systems, and stability analysis of power grid under large shares of renewable energies.

Prof. Dr. Edris Pouresmaeil
Prof. Dr. Jorma Kyyrä
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Grid integration of renewable energy systems
  • Virtual power plants
  • Microgrid and active distribution systems
  • Electrical power conversion
  • Operation and control of power electronics converters in power systems
  • Stability analysis of converter-based systems with RE generation
  • Ancillary services through grid-interfacing power converters
  • Modeling, analysis and control of modular multilevel converters
  • Medium- to high-power modular multilevel converters for dc and ac grids
  • Harmonics and harmonic stability in renewable based power plants, dc transmission networks, and other emerging power electronic based power systems.

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

15 pages, 4812 KiB  
Article
Emulating Rotational Inertia of Synchronous Machines by a New Control Technique in Grid-Interactive Converters
by Meysam Saeedian, Bahram Pournazarian, S. Sajjad Seyedalipour, Bahman Eskandari and Edris Pouresmaeil
Sustainability 2020, 12(13), 5346; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12135346 - 1 Jul 2020
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 2583
Abstract
Integration of renewable energy sources (RESs) into power systems is growing due to eco-friendly concerns and ever-increasing electricity demand. Voltage source converters (VSCs) are the main interface between RESs and power grids, which have neither rotational inertia nor damping characteristics. Lack of these [...] Read more.
Integration of renewable energy sources (RESs) into power systems is growing due to eco-friendly concerns and ever-increasing electricity demand. Voltage source converters (VSCs) are the main interface between RESs and power grids, which have neither rotational inertia nor damping characteristics. Lack of these metrics make the power grid sensitive to frequency disturbances and thereby under frequency, to load shedding activation or even large-scale collapse. In this regard, the contribution of this paper is to develop a new control technique for VSCs that can provide virtual inertia and damping properties with the DC-link capacitors inhered in the DC-side of grid-tied VSCs. The applied VSC is controlled in the current controlled model, with the capability of injecting extra active power with the aim of frequency support during perturbations. The dynamics assessment of the proposed platform is derived in detail. It is revealed that the control scheme performs in a stable region even under weak-grid conditions. Finally, simulations are conducted in MATLAB to depict the efficacy and feasibility of the proposed method. The results show that frequency deviation is mitigated under step up/down changes in the demand, and the rate of change of frequency is improved by 47.37% compared to the case in which the synthetic inertia loop is canceled out. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Power Electronics for Renewable Energy Systems)
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18 pages, 8771 KiB  
Article
Evaluating Influence of Inverter-based Resources on System Strength Considering Inverter Interaction Level
by Dohyuk Kim, Hwanhee Cho, Bohyun Park and Byongjun Lee
Sustainability 2020, 12(8), 3469; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12083469 - 24 Apr 2020
Cited by 23 | Viewed by 4198
Abstract
The penetration of renewable energy sources (RESs) equipped with inverter-based control systems such as wind and solar plants are increasing. Therefore, the speed of the voltage controllers associated with inverter-based resources (IBRs) has a substantial impact on the stability of the interconnected grid. [...] Read more.
The penetration of renewable energy sources (RESs) equipped with inverter-based control systems such as wind and solar plants are increasing. Therefore, the speed of the voltage controllers associated with inverter-based resources (IBRs) has a substantial impact on the stability of the interconnected grid. System strength evaluation is one of the important concerns in the integration of IBRs, and this strength is often evaluated in terms of the short circuit ratio (SCR) index. When IBRs are installed in an adjacent location, system strength can be weaker than evaluation by SCR. This study proposes an inverter interaction level short circuit ratio (IILSCR) method by tracing IBRs output flow. The IILSCR can accurately estimate system strength, wherein IBRs are connected in adjacent spots, by reflecting the interaction level between IBRs. The study also demonstrates the efficiency of IILSCR by applying this method to Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) 39 bus test system and future Korea power systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Power Electronics for Renewable Energy Systems)
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15 pages, 4841 KiB  
Article
Resonance Detection Strategy for Multi-Parallel Inverter-Based Grid-Connected Renewable Power System Using Cascaded SOGI-FLL
by Wu Cao, Kangli Liu, Haotian Kang, Shunyu Wang, Dongchen Fan and Jianfeng Zhao
Sustainability 2019, 11(18), 4839; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11184839 - 4 Sep 2019
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2533
Abstract
The increasing use of multi-parallel grid-connected inverters introduces both high-quality and high-capacity power, while it tends to cause a resonance instability problem. A resonance damper can virtualize a resistor at resonant frequency to suppress the instability effectively, but the resonant frequency should be [...] Read more.
The increasing use of multi-parallel grid-connected inverters introduces both high-quality and high-capacity power, while it tends to cause a resonance instability problem. A resonance damper can virtualize a resistor at resonant frequency to suppress the instability effectively, but the resonant frequency should be detected primarily. However, the resonant current or voltage is severely distorted and oscillating, which will lead to the resonant frequency extraction being more difficult. To address it, this paper proposes a resonance detection strategy based on the cascaded second-order generalized integrators (SOGI) and the normalized frequency locked loop (FLL). The cascaded structure ensures the accuracy by completely filtering the fundamental component from the detected voltage or current, and the normalization accelerates the frequency detection. The proposed method can be used as a crucial unit of the resonance damping controller. Finally, the performance of the proposed method is verified by the MATLAB-based simulation and Hardware-in-the-Loop (HIL)-based emulation results. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Power Electronics for Renewable Energy Systems)
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18 pages, 9678 KiB  
Article
An Asymmetrical Step-Up Multilevel Inverter Based on Switched-Capacitor Network
by Amir Taghvaie, Ahmad Alijani, M. Ebrahim Adabi, Mohammad Rezanejad, Jafar Adabi, Kumars Rouzbehi and Edris Pouresmaeil
Sustainability 2019, 11(12), 3453; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11123453 - 23 Jun 2019
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 3228
Abstract
This paper presents a transformerless step-up multilevel inverter based on a switched-capacitor structure. One of the main contributions of the proposed topology is replacing the separated DC voltage source with capacitors which are charged at predetermined time intervals. Therefore, a high-level staircase voltage [...] Read more.
This paper presents a transformerless step-up multilevel inverter based on a switched-capacitor structure. One of the main contributions of the proposed topology is replacing the separated DC voltage source with capacitors which are charged at predetermined time intervals. Therefore, a high-level staircase voltage waveform can be achieved by discharging some of these capacitors on the load. The other contribution of the proposed structure is to eliminate the magnetic elements which traditionally boost the input DC voltage. In addition, asymmetrical or unequal amounts of capacitor voltages create more voltage levels, which enable voltage level increments without increasing the number of semiconductor devices. This paper introduces a self-balanced boost Switched-Capacitors Multilevel Inverter (SCMLI) which is able to create a nearly sinusoidal voltage waveform with a maximum voltage of up to 45 times that of the input voltage DC source. Higher level output voltage levels are also achievable by extending the circuit topology. After determination of the switching angles and selecting the proper switching states for each level, an offline NLC method is used for modulation, which eases the control implementation. Analysis, simulation and experiments are carried out for a 91-level inverter (45 levels for positive and negative voltages and one for zero voltage) are presented. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Power Electronics for Renewable Energy Systems)
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27 pages, 4786 KiB  
Article
Day-Ahead Scheduling Model of the Distributed Small Hydro-Wind-Energy Storage Power System Based on Two-Stage Stochastic Robust Optimization
by Jun Dong, Peiwen Yang and Shilin Nie
Sustainability 2019, 11(10), 2829; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11102829 - 17 May 2019
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 3174
Abstract
With renewable energy sources (RESs) highly penetrating into the power system, new problems emerge for the independent system operator (ISO) to maintain and keep the power system safe and reliable in the day-ahead dispatching process under the fluctuation caused by renewable energy. In [...] Read more.
With renewable energy sources (RESs) highly penetrating into the power system, new problems emerge for the independent system operator (ISO) to maintain and keep the power system safe and reliable in the day-ahead dispatching process under the fluctuation caused by renewable energy. In this paper, considering the small hydropower with no reservoir, different from the other hydro optimization research and wind power uncertain circumstances, a day-ahead scheduling model is proposed for a distributed power grid system which contains several distributed generators, such as small hydropower and wind power, and energy storage systems. To solve this model, a two-stage stochastic robust optimization approach is presented to smooth out hydro power and wind power output fluctuation with the aim of minimizing the total expected system operation cost under multiple cluster water inflow scenarios, and the worst case of wind power output uncertainty. More specifically, before dispatching and clearing, it is necessary to cluster the historical inflow scenarios of small hydropower into several typical scenarios via the Fuzzy C-means (FCM) clustering method, and then the clustering comprehensive quality (CCQ) method is also presented to evaluate whether these scenarios are representative, which has previously been ignored by cluster research. It can be found through numerical examples that FCM-CCQ can explain the classification more reasonably than the common clustering method. Then we optimize the two stage scheduling, which contain the pre-clearing stage and the rescheduling stage under each typical inflow scenario after clustering, and then calculate the final operating cost under the worst wind power output scenario. To conduct the proposed model, the day-ahead scheduling procedure on the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) 30-bus test system is simulated with real hydropower and wind power data. Compared with traditional deterministic optimization, the results of two-stage stochastic robust optimization structured in this paper, increases the total cost of the system, but enhances the conservative scheduling strategy, improves the stability and reliability of the power system, and reduces the risk of decision-making simultaneously. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Power Electronics for Renewable Energy Systems)
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15 pages, 15209 KiB  
Article
Direct Power Control of Matrix Converter-Fed DFIG with Fixed Switching Frequency
by Arzhang Yousefi-Talouki, Shaghayegh Zalzar and Edris Pouresmaeil
Sustainability 2019, 11(9), 2604; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11092604 - 6 May 2019
Cited by 17 | Viewed by 3284
Abstract
In this paper, a direct power control (DPC) technique is proposed for matrix converter-fed grid-connected doubly fed induction generators (DFIGs). In contrast to what has been investigated in the past for direct torque control (DTC) or DPC of matrix converter-fed DFIGs, the active [...] Read more.
In this paper, a direct power control (DPC) technique is proposed for matrix converter-fed grid-connected doubly fed induction generators (DFIGs). In contrast to what has been investigated in the past for direct torque control (DTC) or DPC of matrix converter-fed DFIGs, the active and reactive powers are regulated in a fixed switching frequency using indirect space vector modulation (ISVM) technique. Hence, designing input filters for matrix converters (MCs) becomes convenient. In addition, the reactive component of input side of MC is controlled which leads to reduction of distortion in grid current waveform. Also, an extensive discussion is addressed for nonlinear voltage errors of MC that may cause inaccurate power control. Simulation results done in MATLAB/Simulink show the effectiveness of the proposed method. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Power Electronics for Renewable Energy Systems)
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12 pages, 3541 KiB  
Article
Impact of Momentary Cessation Voltage Level in Inverter-Based Resources on Increasing the Short Circuit Current
by Namki Choi, Bohyun Park, Hwanhee Cho and Byongjun Lee
Sustainability 2019, 11(4), 1153; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11041153 - 21 Feb 2019
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 3979
Abstract
This study analyzed the impact of varying the momentary cessation (MC) voltage level on the short circuit current of inverter-based resources (IBRs). To analyze the impact of the IBR MC function on the short circuit current, this paper proposes an advanced IBR model [...] Read more.
This study analyzed the impact of varying the momentary cessation (MC) voltage level on the short circuit current of inverter-based resources (IBRs). To analyze the impact of the IBR MC function on the short circuit current, this paper proposes an advanced IBR model for fault current calculation to reflect its fault characteristics and a scheme for analyzing the influence of MC on the short circuit current. Based on the proposed methods, the authors conducted case studies using planning data from the Korea Electric Power Corporation (KEPCO). The influence of MC was investigated on the IBRs located at the southwest side of the KEPCO systems by screening the fault currents while varying the MC voltage. This paper demonstrates that the minimum MC voltage level needed for the fault current not to exceed the circuit breaker (CB) capacity can be proposed through analyzing the impact of MC voltage level on the short circuit current. The test results based on the proposed scheme showed that the short circuit current to power systems could not violate CB capacity if IBRs adjusted the MC voltage level higher than the lowest MC voltage level. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Power Electronics for Renewable Energy Systems)
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