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Special Issue "Cultural Industries and Sustainable Development"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Tourism, Culture, and Heritage".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 August 2022) | Viewed by 6555

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Rungtai Lin
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Graduate School of Creative Industry Design, National Taiwan University of Arts, New Taipei 22058, Taiwan
Interests: ergonomics in product design; human–computer interaction; design education and cognitive approach in design; cultural and creative product design
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. I-Ying Chiang
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Arts and Design, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300044, Taiwan
Interests: craft and design education; cultural product design; metal arts and contemporary jewelry; placemaking
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Jun Wu
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Digital Media Arts, School of Art and design, Shenzhen University. Shenzhen 518060, China
Interests: digital creative design; animation; film

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, 

Affected by the pandemic, many activities in human society have had to change, which has allowed us to reexamine the past ways of getting along with the world. The concept of sustainable development, whether it is the construction of a theoretical level or the promotion of practical applications, still needs more efforts from us. After all, design and cultural creativity will eventually be implemented into specific designs. The complexity of the design itself requires careful consideration in all aspects. Especially in the engineering field, how can we make the design more in line with human nature? How can we implement the spirit and concept of sustainable development in the process of R&D? This requires mutual assistance between designers, engineers, and companies. Meanwhile, how to make consumers more rational and let them realize the necessity and urgency of sustainable development through design and creativity is also worthy of further consideration. In the field of cultural industry, it is also worth thinking about how to strike a balance between “Design Thinking” and “Design Decision” to meet the vision of sustainable development. This Special Issue is focused on discussing the development, application, potential, and boundary of cultural industries as well as creative practices from the perspective of sustainable development. Thus, theoretical research via scrupulous literature reviews in various scopes of design, and empirical studies of significant design cases are welcome.

Potential topics include but are not limited to:

  • Frameworks for cultural industries and sustainable development with creativity and critical thinking;
  • Theoretics and practice within cultural industries and sustainable development approaches;
  • Cultural industries and sustainable development of cross-disciplines;
  • Design implementation for sustainable development;
  • Research of creative design strategy;
  • Design for society;
  • Special topics of design case studies.

Relevant Reference:

  1. Agbedahin, A. V. (2019). Sustainable development, education for sustainable development, and the 2030 agenda for sustainable development: Emergence, efficacy, Eminence, and future. Sustainable Development, 27(4), 669-680. doi:10.1002/sd.1931
  2. Cross, N. (2011). Design thinking: Understanding how designers think and work. Oxford and New York: Berg/Bloomsbury.
  3. Lin, R.-T. (2007). Transforming Taiwan aboriginal cultural features into modern product design: A case study of a cross- cultural product design model. International Journal of Design, 1(2), 47-55.
  4. Calabrò, G., D’Amico, A., Lanfranchi, M., Moschella, G., Pulejo, L., & Salomone, R. (2012). Moving from the crisis to sustainability. Emerging issues in the international context: Emerging issues in the international context. Milan, Italy: FrancoAngeli.
  5. Cooper, T. (2012). Longer lasting products: Alternatives to the throwaway society. Aldershot, UK: Gower Publishing.
  6. Jonas, H. (1985). The imperative of responsibility: In search of an ethics for the technological age. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.
  7. Jordan, P. W. Pleasure with products: Human factors for body, mind and soul. In: Green, W., & Jordan, P. W. (1999). (Eds.). Human factors in product design: Current practice and future trends (pp. 206-217). Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press.
  8. Durning, A. (1991). Limiting consumption: Toward a sustainable culture. The Futurist, July–August, pp. 11-15.
  9. Ekins, P. (1991). The sustainable consumer society: A contradiction in terms. International Environmental Affairs, 3(4), 243-258.
  10. Guiltinan, J. (2008). Creative destruction and destructive creations: Environmental ethics and planned obsolescence. Journal of Business Ethics, 89(S1), 19-28. doi:10.1007/s10551-008-9907-9

Prof. Dr. Rungtai Lin
Prof. I-Ying Chiang
Dr. Jun Wu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • cultural industries
  • sustainable development
  • design thinking
  • design strategy
  • cross-cultural design

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Article
The Relationship between Form and Ritual in Cultural Sustainability
Sustainability 2022, 14(15), 9157; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14159157 - 26 Jul 2022
Viewed by 396
Abstract
Intangible cultural heritage tourism has become a hot topic in academia and industry. As a vital tourism resource, intangible cultural heritage can activate the in-depth experience of tourists for local culture to enhance the attraction and competitive advantage of national or regional tourism. [...] Read more.
Intangible cultural heritage tourism has become a hot topic in academia and industry. As a vital tourism resource, intangible cultural heritage can activate the in-depth experience of tourists for local culture to enhance the attraction and competitive advantage of national or regional tourism. From the perspective of culture, design is used to realize a kind of life taste and form a lifestyle through cultural creativity and industry, with applications in different fields to create a human lifestyle through innovative design. This study proposed a framework exploring form and ritual and discusses the aesthetic economy from form (Hi-tech) to ritual (Hi-touch) through case studies. There were three cases that analyzed how to improve local tourism development through the interaction between form and ritual. The results show that this model can integrate sustainable development into intangible cultural heritage tourism and can be further verified in other countries and regions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cultural Industries and Sustainable Development)
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Article
Exploring Indigenous Craft Materials and Sustainable Design—A Case Study Based on Taiwan Kavalan Banana Fibre
Sustainability 2022, 14(13), 7872; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14137872 - 28 Jun 2022
Viewed by 442
Abstract
For a long time, local craft traditions were passed on through apprenticeships. Consequently, new generations of designers and industries cannot easily intervene or produce new designs. This inability to integrate craft traditions in a modern context and changing cultural environment has resulted in [...] Read more.
For a long time, local craft traditions were passed on through apprenticeships. Consequently, new generations of designers and industries cannot easily intervene or produce new designs. This inability to integrate craft traditions in a modern context and changing cultural environment has resulted in the stagnation, decline, or even elimination of such crafts. This study focused on the use of banana fibres in the craft traditions of the Kavalan people of Taiwan, and research-through-design concepts were applied to the creative study of materials that are essential to ecological sustainability and cultural heritage. The method, Material Driven Design (MDD), was implemented through participation to experience traditional processes and explore the visible properties of craft materials. The goal was to gain a holistic understanding of materials and leverage the participants’ expertise in determining which steps in the methods could be improved. This process was supplemented with grounded theory, which was used to analyse and summarise the data in order to understand the factors influencing the creations of participants. Lastly, in addition to producing semifinished and finished products in our experiment, we believe that our findings regarding the examined materials and material tinkering to develop a material-tinkering loop based on the MDD can be (i) combined with the unique insights and technical expertise of designers and (ii) used alongside contemporary technical and digital aids to effectively support the continued development of innovative craft designs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cultural Industries and Sustainable Development)
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Article
Inheritance of Traditional Family Values: A Comparative Study of Family Ancestral Shrines and Related Paintings of Lee Family
Sustainability 2022, 14(12), 7188; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14127188 - 12 Jun 2022
Viewed by 683
Abstract
Apart from providing a haven, a home serves also as a place where people can develop their personalities and temperaments. Traditions within families are an often-unseen force that has a profound effect on people. In this article, the authors explore the meaning and [...] Read more.
Apart from providing a haven, a home serves also as a place where people can develop their personalities and temperaments. Traditions within families are an often-unseen force that has a profound effect on people. In this article, the authors explore the meaning and value of family traditional inheritance in the current context and what manifestations may occur. After reviewing the history and characteristics of ancestral shrines, this study further examined the forms of expression used to express “home” and “family traditions” from the creator’s perspective. A conceptual framework is provided for subsequent case studies. Considering the role and importance of different creations in the transmitting of family traditions, a family memorial hall named “Qiyun Residence” and a series of paintings called “Home: Sweet Home” were created by members of this family to analyze and interpret family traditions. The importance of family traditions cannot be overstated, but they must be appropriately expressed. It is our aim that the examples presented in this article show how “Traditional” can be transferred to “Modernity” for the sustainability of culture. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cultural Industries and Sustainable Development)
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Article
Sustainable Development Assessment of Cultural and Creative Industries in Casino Cities: A Case Study of Macao
Sustainability 2022, 14(8), 4749; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14084749 - 15 Apr 2022
Viewed by 598
Abstract
In Macao, the government established the Cultural and Creative Industry Promotion Office and Cultural Industries Committee in 2010, which nominated eight to-be-developed cultural and creative industries (CCIs): design, visual arts, performing arts, clothing, pop music, film and video, animation, and publishing. However, because [...] Read more.
In Macao, the government established the Cultural and Creative Industry Promotion Office and Cultural Industries Committee in 2010, which nominated eight to-be-developed cultural and creative industries (CCIs): design, visual arts, performing arts, clothing, pop music, film and video, animation, and publishing. However, because each CCI has its unique pattern and environmental resources are very limited in Macao, an industrial chain analysis for these eight industries should be conducted prior to policy implementation. Therefore, this study organized an industrial feasibility analysis for these eight CCIs. The methodologies included in-depth interviews, a literature analysis, and knowledge-discovery in databases. On the other hand, this study adopted the concept of creative industries, “the relationship between production and reproduction”, and “the three-circle hypothetical interactive consumption” model for positioning these eight CCIs to choose existing industries in Macao, such as the exhibition, gambling, and cultural tourism industries, that are likely to promote CCIs. Next, the orientations of these CCIs are determined. Finally, it is suggested that the performing arts, design, and visual arts industries should be prioritized currently, and the heritage management and digital media industries are advised as to-be-developed ones. In contrast, the clothing, pop music, film and video, animation, and publishing industries are not so beneficial for Macao’s development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cultural Industries and Sustainable Development)
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Article
Sustainable Development in Local Culture Industries: A Case Study of Taiwan Aboriginal Communities
Sustainability 2022, 14(6), 3404; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14063404 - 14 Mar 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 991
Abstract
Taiwan’s indigenous communities have an abundance of unique cultures. Their service industries with local and foreign cultures have opened up distinct opportunities for sustainable development. Despite the enormous potential of aboriginal communities, particular attention should be given to ecology and sustainability. The traditional [...] Read more.
Taiwan’s indigenous communities have an abundance of unique cultures. Their service industries with local and foreign cultures have opened up distinct opportunities for sustainable development. Despite the enormous potential of aboriginal communities, particular attention should be given to ecology and sustainability. The traditional emphasis on craftsmanship and design is shifting to a new focus on the service industries and experimental design, which is not limited to the design of tangible products. Design concepts are now being applied to service industries that span several fields and are also being used to come up with systematic solutions for real-life problems. However, in the service industry, design experience must be used when introducing design concepts. The problem is how to shift from “High-tech” to “High-touch”, for the aborigines are used to designing products at the usability level. This research proposes a model of experience design for use in aboriginal culture revitalization. Three different cases show how to apply the framework from experience design to local revitalization. Results show that the model can integrate the principles of sustainability into service industries and that it needs to be verified in future studies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cultural Industries and Sustainable Development)
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