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Cultural Industries and Sustainable Development

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Tourism, Culture, and Heritage".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 August 2022) | Viewed by 49593

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Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Graduate School of Creative Industry Design, National Taiwan University of Arts, New Taipei 22058, Taiwan
Interests: ergonomics in product design; human–computer interaction; design education and cognitive approach in design; cultural and creative product design
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Department of Digital Media Arts, School of Art and Design, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060, China
Interests: digital creative design; animation; film; design education
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, 

Affected by the pandemic, many activities in human society have had to change, which has allowed us to reexamine the past ways of getting along with the world. The concept of sustainable development, whether it is the construction of a theoretical level or the promotion of practical applications, still needs more efforts from us. After all, design and cultural creativity will eventually be implemented into specific designs. The complexity of the design itself requires careful consideration in all aspects. Especially in the engineering field, how can we make the design more in line with human nature? How can we implement the spirit and concept of sustainable development in the process of R&D? This requires mutual assistance between designers, engineers, and companies. Meanwhile, how to make consumers more rational and let them realize the necessity and urgency of sustainable development through design and creativity is also worthy of further consideration. In the field of cultural industry, it is also worth thinking about how to strike a balance between “Design Thinking” and “Design Decision” to meet the vision of sustainable development. This Special Issue is focused on discussing the development, application, potential, and boundary of cultural industries as well as creative practices from the perspective of sustainable development. Thus, theoretical research via scrupulous literature reviews in various scopes of design, and empirical studies of significant design cases are welcome.

Potential topics include but are not limited to:

  • Frameworks for cultural industries and sustainable development with creativity and critical thinking;
  • Theoretics and practice within cultural industries and sustainable development approaches;
  • Cultural industries and sustainable development of cross-disciplines;
  • Design implementation for sustainable development;
  • Research of creative design strategy;
  • Design for society;
  • Special topics of design case studies.

Relevant Reference:

  1. Agbedahin, A. V. (2019). Sustainable development, education for sustainable development, and the 2030 agenda for sustainable development: Emergence, efficacy, Eminence, and future. Sustainable Development, 27(4), 669-680. doi:10.1002/sd.1931
  2. Cross, N. (2011). Design thinking: Understanding how designers think and work. Oxford and New York: Berg/Bloomsbury.
  3. Lin, R.-T. (2007). Transforming Taiwan aboriginal cultural features into modern product design: A case study of a cross- cultural product design model. International Journal of Design, 1(2), 47-55.
  4. Calabrò, G., D’Amico, A., Lanfranchi, M., Moschella, G., Pulejo, L., & Salomone, R. (2012). Moving from the crisis to sustainability. Emerging issues in the international context: Emerging issues in the international context. Milan, Italy: FrancoAngeli.
  5. Cooper, T. (2012). Longer lasting products: Alternatives to the throwaway society. Aldershot, UK: Gower Publishing.
  6. Jonas, H. (1985). The imperative of responsibility: In search of an ethics for the technological age. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.
  7. Jordan, P. W. Pleasure with products: Human factors for body, mind and soul. In: Green, W., & Jordan, P. W. (1999). (Eds.). Human factors in product design: Current practice and future trends (pp. 206-217). Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press.
  8. Durning, A. (1991). Limiting consumption: Toward a sustainable culture. The Futurist, July–August, pp. 11-15.
  9. Ekins, P. (1991). The sustainable consumer society: A contradiction in terms. International Environmental Affairs, 3(4), 243-258.
  10. Guiltinan, J. (2008). Creative destruction and destructive creations: Environmental ethics and planned obsolescence. Journal of Business Ethics, 89(S1), 19-28. doi:10.1007/s10551-008-9907-9

Prof. Dr. Rungtai Lin
Prof. I-Ying Chiang
Dr. Jun Wu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • cultural industries
  • sustainable development
  • design thinking
  • design strategy
  • cross-cultural design

Published Papers (12 papers)

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Editorial

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6 pages, 193 KiB  
Editorial
Sustainability|Special Issue: Cultural Industries and Sustainable Development
by Rungtai Lin, I-Ying Chiang and Jun Wu
Sustainability 2023, 15(1), 128; https://doi.org/10.3390/su15010128 - 22 Dec 2022
Viewed by 1630
Abstract
In response to the pandemic, many activities in human society have had to change, which has allowed us to re-examine past ways of getting along with the world [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cultural Industries and Sustainable Development)

Research

Jump to: Editorial

15 pages, 4677 KiB  
Article
A Pilot Study on Reproduction and Sustainable Development under the Promotion of Crafts: Taking Weaving in Taiwan as an Example
by Yikang Sun, His-Yen Lin and Rungtai Lin
Sustainability 2022, 14(20), 13116; https://doi.org/10.3390/su142013116 - 13 Oct 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2028
Abstract
Taiwan’s crafts have a long history and distinctive characteristics. Crafting faces many challenges, such as the lack of new involvement and how to achieve sustainable development. This study takes Taiwanese weaving as an example. Employing a qualitative research method, this study focuses on [...] Read more.
Taiwan’s crafts have a long history and distinctive characteristics. Crafting faces many challenges, such as the lack of new involvement and how to achieve sustainable development. This study takes Taiwanese weaving as an example. Employing a qualitative research method, this study focuses on measures that will help achieve sustainable development. After reviewing the humanistic approaches toward and values of craftsmanship, a conceptual model of communication and cognition between craftsmen and the public is constructed using communication theory. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews with three craftsmen in the field of weaving. The findings indicate that the tenacity and connotations of Taiwanese crafts have been well protected. The question of how to make it sustainable has become increasingly more important. Three features were identified that may be important considerations to make for future development efforts: (1) emphasizing the cultivation of craftsmanship education; (2) keeping pace with the times so that handicrafts continue to transform; and (3) letting the crafts better reflect the true meaning of life. Future studies will further validate the results of this study, avoiding too few respondents or the limitations of subjective opinions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cultural Industries and Sustainable Development)
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22 pages, 3520 KiB  
Article
Empirical Study on Design Trend of Taiwan (1960s–2020): The Evolution of Theme, Diversity and Sustainability
by Jianping Huang, Yuheng Tao, Minghong Shi and Jun Wu
Sustainability 2022, 14(19), 12578; https://doi.org/10.3390/su141912578 - 03 Oct 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1983
Abstract
With significance in improving and developing local design culture as well as in supplementing global design history, this essay describes a study on the past and a clear prediction of the future by exploring Taiwan’s design history from approximately the 1960s to 2020 [...] Read more.
With significance in improving and developing local design culture as well as in supplementing global design history, this essay describes a study on the past and a clear prediction of the future by exploring Taiwan’s design history from approximately the 1960s to 2020 based on the evolution of theme, diversity, and sustainability. In this research, the Python programming language is used to apply three algorithms of term frequency–inverse document frequency (TF-IDF), Simpson’s diversity index (SDI), and latent Dirichlet allocation (LDA) to conduct a text exploration of design journals. The results show the following: in the 1960s–1980s, the evolution of theme focused on evaluation strategies, technical practices, and foreign cultures, on digital design, multiculturalism, and design aesthetics in the 1990s, and on emotional human factors, intelligent technology, and local culture since the beginning of the 21st century. Local culture and intelligent technology are the main driving forces of the current design industry. Regarding diversity, after a period of rapid change and stable rising, it has shown a downward trend in recent years. This indicates that current design needs to be stimulated by external environmental variations. Sustainability was focused on technology, the market, and education during the 1960s–1980s; on consumers, design education, and eco-design during the 1990s; and on integration across fields during the 2000s–2020. In order to gain a wider perspective of the complete design context of Chinese culture, the results show the current and future trends of the academic community, in addition to a reference for the study of the design histories of other areas in the world. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cultural Industries and Sustainable Development)
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20 pages, 7495 KiB  
Article
How Design Technology Improves the Sustainability of Intangible Cultural Heritage Products: A Practical Study on Bamboo Basketry Craft
by Yan Sun and Xiaojian Liu
Sustainability 2022, 14(19), 12058; https://doi.org/10.3390/su141912058 - 23 Sep 2022
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 3323
Abstract
The sustainability problem of many intangible cultural heritage (ICH) products stems from the shrinking of the core practitioner group, which is also the case for bamboo basketry craft. We believe that the problem in bamboo basketry originated in the lack of labor division [...] Read more.
The sustainability problem of many intangible cultural heritage (ICH) products stems from the shrinking of the core practitioner group, which is also the case for bamboo basketry craft. We believe that the problem in bamboo basketry originated in the lack of labor division between design and manufacturing, which prevents professional designers from entering this industry and results in the absence of several key stakeholders related to innovation and R&D. The lack of labor division is due to the technical difficulties associated with expressing the design concepts. The complexity of basket weaving structures makes it difficult to communicate between designer and manufacturer without precise expression tools, thus binding design and manufacturing into an integrated role. Guided by the user innovation theory, our team studied the design technology of bamboo basketry and developed a series of aiding tools, including the modeling of basic over–under structures and free weaving structures, automatic mapping techniques from 2D to 3D and several frequently used weaving skills, such as connecting, wrapping, plaiting and knotting. This technology enables designers to quickly design and express weaving structures with full details in digital models rather than to make samples. The application of the software shows that the technology considerably improved the designer interest and confidence. This technical solution makes designers, rather than programmers, able to do the development work, which also helps to create a sustainable ecological environment of technological research, also avoiding the difficulties associated with attracting business investment for such niche demands in the starting stage. Our practice shows that the sustainability of ICH products and the sustainability of the industry are closely related and that solving the latter supports the former. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cultural Industries and Sustainable Development)
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16 pages, 1706 KiB  
Article
How the Experience Designs of Sustainable Festive Events Affect Cultural Emotion, Travel Motivation, and Behavioral Intention
by Hui-Yun Yen
Sustainability 2022, 14(19), 11807; https://doi.org/10.3390/su141911807 - 20 Sep 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2582
Abstract
Festivals are an important aspect of cultural design. They not only attract a large number of tourists but are also one of the most direct ways of promoting local culture. This study aimed to discover how festival experiences affect cultural feelings, travel motivations, [...] Read more.
Festivals are an important aspect of cultural design. They not only attract a large number of tourists but are also one of the most direct ways of promoting local culture. This study aimed to discover how festival experiences affect cultural feelings, travel motivations, and behavioral intentions. Based on literature research, theoretical model construction, and analysis, this paper begins with an exploration of the literature and designs a structural model to validate consumers’ expectations and conceptions of the 2021 Tainan Chihsi Festival. A total of 238 residents from Taiwan answered the questionnaire. This study used SEM and ANOVA for data analysis. The impact model of the festival experience design presented here can provide reference standards for in-depth research in related fields. Moreover, cultural emotion is a critical component in designing influential festive event experiences that evoke travel motivations and behavioral intentions. Virtual events can emphasize personal elements and educational content. In-person events can emphasize group interaction and entertainment. A combination of virtual and in-person experiences or personal and group exchanges would be ideal. Organizers should consider including emotional elements in their festive events in addition to originality. The inclusion of cultural elements can also foster “shared” experiences between locals and visitors, diversifying urban landscapes and strengthening community interaction. Organizers can plan festive events that align with consumers’ expectations, distinguish festive events from other community events, and add uniqueness and originality to their events. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cultural Industries and Sustainable Development)
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21 pages, 852 KiB  
Article
Eliciting Brand Loyalty with Elements of Customer Experience: A Case Study on the Creative Life Industry
by Shu-Hua Chang
Sustainability 2022, 14(18), 11547; https://doi.org/10.3390/su141811547 - 14 Sep 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2947
Abstract
The Creative Life Industry (CLI) is an experiential industry within the experience economy in Taiwan. Given the scarcity of research on the realms of experience and brand loyalty within this field of the CLI, this study aims to further our understanding of how [...] Read more.
The Creative Life Industry (CLI) is an experiential industry within the experience economy in Taiwan. Given the scarcity of research on the realms of experience and brand loyalty within this field of the CLI, this study aims to further our understanding of how designing valuable realms of experience can generate brand loyalty in customers. Employing a qualitative research method, the present study focuses on how the CLI is experienced. Data were collected using in-depth semi-structured interviews with 20 customers and through observations; secondary data at two CLI sites in Taiwan were also used. The findings indicate that many elements play a role within the realms of experience in CLI businesses. These include cultural experience interest, relaxing and entertaining programs, guided tours with educational and esthetic meaning, living esthetic program relatability, architectural style and esthetics, fashionable product design, living design different from routine life, and uniqueness of service facilities. Moreover, elements of escapist and esthetic experiences have more significant effects on brand loyalty than other types of experience. The theoretical and practical implications are provided for CLI businesses and researchers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cultural Industries and Sustainable Development)
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17 pages, 312 KiB  
Article
K-Pop’s Global Success and Its Innovative Production System
by Joseph Kim and Seung-Ho Kwon
Sustainability 2022, 14(17), 11101; https://doi.org/10.3390/su141711101 - 05 Sep 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 11718
Abstract
The global music market has witnessed the rapid rise of Korean pop music, K-pop, in recent years. While there has been an increased interest of scholars from various disciplines to account for the global success of K-pop, limited attention has been paid to [...] Read more.
The global music market has witnessed the rapid rise of Korean pop music, K-pop, in recent years. While there has been an increased interest of scholars from various disciplines to account for the global success of K-pop, limited attention has been paid to the key players in the industry, music businesses. Based on a historical analysis of Korea’s music industry, we contend that the innovative production system of Korea’s music businesses has played a significant role in facilitating K-pop’s global success. In order to provide theoretical support to the argument, this paper critically reviews the existing literature to present debates on (i) the process of how value is created in distinctive stages in the music industry; (ii) cooperative and competitive interactions between firms within the music industry; and (iii) changes in the music industry’s competitive environment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cultural Industries and Sustainable Development)
17 pages, 2592 KiB  
Article
The Relationship between Form and Ritual in Cultural Sustainability
by Jun Wu, Lee-Hsiu Ju, Po-Hsien Lin and Yanru Lyu
Sustainability 2022, 14(15), 9157; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14159157 - 26 Jul 2022
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 2472
Abstract
Intangible cultural heritage tourism has become a hot topic in academia and industry. As a vital tourism resource, intangible cultural heritage can activate the in-depth experience of tourists for local culture to enhance the attraction and competitive advantage of national or regional tourism. [...] Read more.
Intangible cultural heritage tourism has become a hot topic in academia and industry. As a vital tourism resource, intangible cultural heritage can activate the in-depth experience of tourists for local culture to enhance the attraction and competitive advantage of national or regional tourism. From the perspective of culture, design is used to realize a kind of life taste and form a lifestyle through cultural creativity and industry, with applications in different fields to create a human lifestyle through innovative design. This study proposed a framework exploring form and ritual and discusses the aesthetic economy from form (Hi-tech) to ritual (Hi-touch) through case studies. There were three cases that analyzed how to improve local tourism development through the interaction between form and ritual. The results show that this model can integrate sustainable development into intangible cultural heritage tourism and can be further verified in other countries and regions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cultural Industries and Sustainable Development)
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30 pages, 32977 KiB  
Article
Exploring Indigenous Craft Materials and Sustainable Design—A Case Study Based on Taiwan Kavalan Banana Fibre
by Yi-Shiang Lin and Ming-Huang Lin
Sustainability 2022, 14(13), 7872; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14137872 - 28 Jun 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 5454
Abstract
For a long time, local craft traditions were passed on through apprenticeships. Consequently, new generations of designers and industries cannot easily intervene or produce new designs. This inability to integrate craft traditions in a modern context and changing cultural environment has resulted in [...] Read more.
For a long time, local craft traditions were passed on through apprenticeships. Consequently, new generations of designers and industries cannot easily intervene or produce new designs. This inability to integrate craft traditions in a modern context and changing cultural environment has resulted in the stagnation, decline, or even elimination of such crafts. This study focused on the use of banana fibres in the craft traditions of the Kavalan people of Taiwan, and research-through-design concepts were applied to the creative study of materials that are essential to ecological sustainability and cultural heritage. The method, Material Driven Design (MDD), was implemented through participation to experience traditional processes and explore the visible properties of craft materials. The goal was to gain a holistic understanding of materials and leverage the participants’ expertise in determining which steps in the methods could be improved. This process was supplemented with grounded theory, which was used to analyse and summarise the data in order to understand the factors influencing the creations of participants. Lastly, in addition to producing semifinished and finished products in our experiment, we believe that our findings regarding the examined materials and material tinkering to develop a material-tinkering loop based on the MDD can be (i) combined with the unique insights and technical expertise of designers and (ii) used alongside contemporary technical and digital aids to effectively support the continued development of innovative craft designs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cultural Industries and Sustainable Development)
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15 pages, 50705 KiB  
Article
Inheritance of Traditional Family Values: A Comparative Study of Family Ancestral Shrines and Related Paintings of Lee Family
by Yikang Sun, Hsienfu Lo, Jing Cao and Rungtai Lin
Sustainability 2022, 14(12), 7188; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14127188 - 12 Jun 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 3207
Abstract
Apart from providing a haven, a home serves also as a place where people can develop their personalities and temperaments. Traditions within families are an often-unseen force that has a profound effect on people. In this article, the authors explore the meaning and [...] Read more.
Apart from providing a haven, a home serves also as a place where people can develop their personalities and temperaments. Traditions within families are an often-unseen force that has a profound effect on people. In this article, the authors explore the meaning and value of family traditional inheritance in the current context and what manifestations may occur. After reviewing the history and characteristics of ancestral shrines, this study further examined the forms of expression used to express “home” and “family traditions” from the creator’s perspective. A conceptual framework is provided for subsequent case studies. Considering the role and importance of different creations in the transmitting of family traditions, a family memorial hall named “Qiyun Residence” and a series of paintings called “Home: Sweet Home” were created by members of this family to analyze and interpret family traditions. The importance of family traditions cannot be overstated, but they must be appropriately expressed. It is our aim that the examples presented in this article show how “Traditional” can be transferred to “Modernity” for the sustainability of culture. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cultural Industries and Sustainable Development)
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27 pages, 1056 KiB  
Article
Sustainable Development Assessment of Cultural and Creative Industries in Casino Cities: A Case Study of Macao
by Yuching Lee, Chingtun Peng, Taindow Lee and Zhengyuan Zhao
Sustainability 2022, 14(8), 4749; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14084749 - 15 Apr 2022
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 3078
Abstract
In Macao, the government established the Cultural and Creative Industry Promotion Office and Cultural Industries Committee in 2010, which nominated eight to-be-developed cultural and creative industries (CCIs): design, visual arts, performing arts, clothing, pop music, film and video, animation, and publishing. However, because [...] Read more.
In Macao, the government established the Cultural and Creative Industry Promotion Office and Cultural Industries Committee in 2010, which nominated eight to-be-developed cultural and creative industries (CCIs): design, visual arts, performing arts, clothing, pop music, film and video, animation, and publishing. However, because each CCI has its unique pattern and environmental resources are very limited in Macao, an industrial chain analysis for these eight industries should be conducted prior to policy implementation. Therefore, this study organized an industrial feasibility analysis for these eight CCIs. The methodologies included in-depth interviews, a literature analysis, and knowledge-discovery in databases. On the other hand, this study adopted the concept of creative industries, “the relationship between production and reproduction”, and “the three-circle hypothetical interactive consumption” model for positioning these eight CCIs to choose existing industries in Macao, such as the exhibition, gambling, and cultural tourism industries, that are likely to promote CCIs. Next, the orientations of these CCIs are determined. Finally, it is suggested that the performing arts, design, and visual arts industries should be prioritized currently, and the heritage management and digital media industries are advised as to-be-developed ones. In contrast, the clothing, pop music, film and video, animation, and publishing industries are not so beneficial for Macao’s development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cultural Industries and Sustainable Development)
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14 pages, 8918 KiB  
Article
Sustainable Development in Local Culture Industries: A Case Study of Taiwan Aboriginal Communities
by Cheng-Hsiang Yang, Yikang Sun, Po-Hsien Lin and Rungtai Lin
Sustainability 2022, 14(6), 3404; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14063404 - 14 Mar 2022
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 3435
Abstract
Taiwan’s indigenous communities have an abundance of unique cultures. Their service industries with local and foreign cultures have opened up distinct opportunities for sustainable development. Despite the enormous potential of aboriginal communities, particular attention should be given to ecology and sustainability. The traditional [...] Read more.
Taiwan’s indigenous communities have an abundance of unique cultures. Their service industries with local and foreign cultures have opened up distinct opportunities for sustainable development. Despite the enormous potential of aboriginal communities, particular attention should be given to ecology and sustainability. The traditional emphasis on craftsmanship and design is shifting to a new focus on the service industries and experimental design, which is not limited to the design of tangible products. Design concepts are now being applied to service industries that span several fields and are also being used to come up with systematic solutions for real-life problems. However, in the service industry, design experience must be used when introducing design concepts. The problem is how to shift from “High-tech” to “High-touch”, for the aborigines are used to designing products at the usability level. This research proposes a model of experience design for use in aboriginal culture revitalization. Three different cases show how to apply the framework from experience design to local revitalization. Results show that the model can integrate the principles of sustainability into service industries and that it needs to be verified in future studies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cultural Industries and Sustainable Development)
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