Special Issue "Sustainable Management of Waste Materials in Construction"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Paola Villoria-Sáez
Website
Guest Editor
Building Technology and Environment Research Group, School of Building Construction, Polytechnic University of Madrid, 28040 Madrid, Spain
Interests: construction, sustainable materials, regenerative sustainability, indoor environment, thermal comfort
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Special Issue Information

This Special Issue focuses on sustainable management of the waste generated in the building construction and demolition process.

Scientific research works dealing with sustainable management strategies for construction and demolition waste (CDW) are welcome. We are especially seeking sustainable and innovative solutions that minimize the waste generated and ensure correct management of the waste, valuing the environment and society in line with the sustainable development and circular economy criteria.

In addition, we also encourage research works presenting new tools for on-site waste sorting and recycling, as well as research works dealing with the implementation of best practices or strategies in case studies, exploring their effectiveness and impact on waste reduction and, thus, the environment.

Furthermore, research works exploring alternative ways for CDW recycling, analysing their viability to be used as valuable resources, are also welcome.

Authors should clearly identify the gap of knowledge and novelty of their work as well as highlight the main relevance of the research outcomes.

Dr. Paola Villoria Sáez
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Construction
  • waste management
  • recycling
  • best practices
  • circular economy
  • sustainability

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Exploratory Data Analysis and Data Envelopment Analysis of Construction and Demolition Waste Management in the European Economic Area
Sustainability 2020, 12(12), 4995; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12124995 - 18 Jun 2020
Abstract
This paper deals with the efficiency and sustainability of Construction and Demolition Waste (CDW) management in 30 Member States of the European Economic Area (EEA) (the 28 European Union countries plus Norway and Iceland) for the period 2010–2016 using Exploratory Data Analytics (EDA) [...] Read more.
This paper deals with the efficiency and sustainability of Construction and Demolition Waste (CDW) management in 30 Member States of the European Economic Area (EEA) (the 28 European Union countries plus Norway and Iceland) for the period 2010–2016 using Exploratory Data Analytics (EDA) and Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA). The first stage of the proposed methodology is EDA with already available (the CDW recovery rate) and suggested indicators (e.g., building stock characterization, dwelling occupancy ratio, macroeconomic ratios and CDW breakdown) to characterize the efficiency and sustainability of CDW management. The second stage is to assess the efficiency of countries using DEA through two original CDW production models, one for sustainability, measuring the efficiency of the construction sector for reducing its CDW, and the second a model to score the efficiency of maximizing the CDW recovery rate. The main outcome of the paper is the proposed methodology, which is a candidate for replacing current indicators in order to evaluate the performance of CDW policy, due to is adaptive nature, promoting the continuous improvement and overcoming the limitations of the poor quality of metrics, data and parametric indicators. The methodology has been experimentally validated using Eurostat data for 30 Member States of EEA, ranking them according to the two DEA model scores, to point out the countries considered efficient among those of their scale, as a reference for sustainable and efficient practices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Management of Waste Materials in Construction)
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Open AccessArticle
Landfill Levy Imposition on Construction and Demolition Waste: Australian Stakeholders’ Perceptions
Sustainability 2020, 12(11), 4496; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12114496 - 02 Jun 2020
Abstract
With increased construction activities in capital cities of Australia, the sustainable management of construction and demolition (C&D) has become an important item in the federal and state government agendas. According to the universally accepted concept of waste hierarchy waste disposal is the worst [...] Read more.
With increased construction activities in capital cities of Australia, the sustainable management of construction and demolition (C&D) has become an important item in the federal and state government agendas. According to the universally accepted concept of waste hierarchy waste disposal is the worst preferred waste management option due to environmental issues. Currently, in most Australian jurisdictions, a landfill levy is applied to discourage waste disposal and to further encourage waste recovery. However, there is an ongoing debate as to whether the levy regime could achieve the desired outcome. Therefore, this study, funded by the Australian Sustainable Built Environment National Research Centre, explored the effectiveness of the current landfill levy across Australian jurisdictions. The paper presents the findings of this study that were obtained from a questionnaire survey aiming to capture the main C&D waste management stakeholders on landfill taxing imposition in Australia. The study collected 132 responses from professionals in the construction industry and other industries dealing with C&D waste management and resource recovery. The results demonstrated that those who believed in market incentive approaches outweigh people that were in favour of pecuniary impost approach. Among those who favoured pecuniary imposts, almost 90% of participants agreed with the effectiveness of landfill levies in any waste management system. Other results provided a useful insight into the actual implications of the current levy scheme. It is expected that the findings in this study contribute to developing sound policies that provide a level field for all key stakeholders and to ensure that resource recovery is further encouraged. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Management of Waste Materials in Construction)
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Open AccessCommunication
Chemical Characterisation of Construction and Demolition Waste in Skopje City and Its Surroundings (Republic of Macedonia)
Sustainability 2020, 12(5), 2055; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12052055 - 07 Mar 2020
Abstract
In the Republic of Macedonia, construction and demolition (C&D) waste is often dumped, underestimating the potential recycling and re-use as raw materials for civil engineering works and/or cement/ceramic industries. SAMCODE (Sustainable Approach to Managing Construction and Demolition Waste) is a know-how exchange program, [...] Read more.
In the Republic of Macedonia, construction and demolition (C&D) waste is often dumped, underestimating the potential recycling and re-use as raw materials for civil engineering works and/or cement/ceramic industries. SAMCODE (Sustainable Approach to Managing Construction and Demolition Waste) is a know-how exchange program, the focus of which is chemical characterisation in terms of major and trace elements in order to evaluate the possible Macedonian C&D waste recycling. Thirty-nine C&D waste samples were collected from different dumps in Skopje and surroundings. X-ray fluorescence analyses, carried out on powdered samples, show i) highly variable concentrations, indicative of the heterogenous nature of C&D waste, and ii) high concentration in Cr, Ni, and Zn with respect to Italian, Chinese, and Dutch tolerance limits, probably due to the presence of these elements in ophiolitic rocks and sulphide-bearing deposits, used as raw material in building activity. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry analyses of leachates, performed to assess the mobility of heavy metals, show significant concentrations of Cr, and to a lesser extent, Ni. Results suggest that homogenisation processes of the recycled materials should be implemented and preliminary screening of C&D waste should be performed to eliminate heavy metals-bearing components. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Management of Waste Materials in Construction)
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Open AccessArticle
Testing of the Integrated Energy Behavior of Sustainable Improved Mortar Panels with Recycled Additives by Means of Energy Simulation
Sustainability 2019, 11(11), 3117; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11113117 - 03 Jun 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
Present waste management policies aim to reduce waste environmental impacts and improve resources’ efficiency. The use of waste and recycled materials to develop green construction materials are attracting researchers worldwide to develop new solutions addressed to increase the sustainability of buildings. This work [...] Read more.
Present waste management policies aim to reduce waste environmental impacts and improve resources’ efficiency. The use of waste and recycled materials to develop green construction materials are attracting researchers worldwide to develop new solutions addressed to increase the sustainability of buildings. This work presents a study of a new recycled mortar panel from the point of view of its contribution to the sustainability of buildings. Materials from industrial waste, as rigid polyurethane foam and electric arc furnace slags, are used as an additive of prefabricated mortar panels. The new proposed panels must have good thermal behavior with respect to the heat transfer interactions with the outside temperature and relative humidity, when compared to traditional brick or concrete. A test building with two kinds of representative uses, which are both residential and tertiary, and located in three cities of Spain with different climates, will be energy simulated in order to assess the thermal behavior of new construction or refurbished opaque ventilated façades with the new mortar panel. The thermal behavior of the new mortar panels would be studied by means of two energy assessments: (i) the evaluation of the influence of the new mortar panel in the energy demand of the whole building when compared to traditional materials, and (ii) the detailed analysis of the transient inner surface temperature of the space walls when using the new mortar panel. Based on the results obtained from the energy simulations performed, it follows that the thermal behavior of the mortar panel is, at least, equivalent to those of the other two materials, and even better in some aspects. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Management of Waste Materials in Construction)
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Open AccessArticle
Analysis of Best Practices to Prevent and Manage the Waste Generated in Building Rehabilitation Works
Sustainability 2019, 11(10), 2796; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11102796 - 16 May 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
This paper carries out a survey conducted among the construction agents in order to evaluate the effectiveness and viability of several best practice measures regarding construction and demolition waste (CDW) management in building rehabilitation works. This survey was developed considering that in rehabilitation [...] Read more.
This paper carries out a survey conducted among the construction agents in order to evaluate the effectiveness and viability of several best practice measures regarding construction and demolition waste (CDW) management in building rehabilitation works. This survey was developed considering that in rehabilitation works two well differentiated activities are carried out: those of the dismantling of the building (deconstruction activities) and those of the execution of the new construction (construction activities). Results of this survey show that among the highly rated best practices for the design phase “designing the building in order to help the recovery of the materials at the end of its use” can be highlighted, despite less than 25% of respondents usually implement this measure in their works. Moreover, according to BP during the construction phase, the results reveal that only 70% of respondents routinely implement the most valued measure “Hiring authorized companies for the management of CDW” and 60% the second “Respecting the manufacturer’s directions regarding the transport, collection and commissioning”. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Management of Waste Materials in Construction)
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