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Sustainable Well-Being: Reconciling Research on Well-Being with Sustainability Science

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainability in Geographic Science".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2020) | Viewed by 5588

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Sustainable Development Goals Index and Dashboards
Interests: sociology of sustainable well-being; sustainable development; sustainability, SDGs & Agenda 2030; well-being & quality of life research; happiness; social capital; social indicators

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Research on Subjective Well-Being (SWB) has grown considerably in the last decades and challenged conventional paradigms, especially in Economics. At the same time, Sustainability Science has been warning that humankind’s quest for a better quality of life should have limits: It must not be brought about by excessive pollution, or come at the expense of the planet’s biodiversity. The two growingly important research fields of SWB and sustainability, however, have largely operated in separate spheres, and the important task of fully understanding the links between the two is yet to be done. Moreover, we do not yet understand whether and how people seek to bring about political change towards sustainability and/or well-being through their voting behaviour. In this context, the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) offer a useful tool attempting to move the world towards improved societal well-being in a sustainable manner. This Special Issue therefore collects insightful contributions that incorporate a much-needed perspective of intergenerational justice into research on SWB, as well as studies that strengthen our understanding of the concept of sustainability, e.g. by applying insights from SWB research to Sustainability Science. A final goal of the Special Issue is to better understand how people vote in relation to issues of sustainability and human well-being.

Dr. Christian Kroll
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • well-being
  • sustainability
  • sustainable development
  • happiness
  • life satisfaction
  • voting behaviour
  • political economy
  • Sustainable Development Goals
  • Agenda 2030

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

26 pages, 1613 KiB  
Article
Research on the Influence of Energy Utilization and Economic Development on Human Well-Being in Qinghai-Tibet Plateau
by Mengmeng Meng, Weiguo Fan, Jianchang Lu, Xiaobin Dong and Hejie Wei
Sustainability 2021, 13(1), 196; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13010196 - 28 Dec 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1950
Abstract
Qinghai-Tibet Plateau is a typical resource-rich but economically backward region in western China, and it is of great urgency to improve human well-being. Combined with previous scholars’ research and the characteristics of Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, this paper constructs an index system of human well-being [...] Read more.
Qinghai-Tibet Plateau is a typical resource-rich but economically backward region in western China, and it is of great urgency to improve human well-being. Combined with previous scholars’ research and the characteristics of Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, this paper constructs an index system of human well-being including four dimensions: income and consumption, means of production, means of subsistence, and resource acquisition ability. Then, it uses generalized matrix method estimations to measure the influence of energy utilization and economic development on human well-being and makes a regression analysis on the influence of energy utilization and economic development on human well-being in various provinces in this region. It is found that per capita GDP and coke utilization promote the well-being of all dimensions, while the urban registered unemployment rate only promotes the well-being of means of subsistence. The utilization of gasoline and natural gas promotes income and consumption and inhibits the means of subsistence and resource acquisition ability, but they have opposite effects on means of production. The impacts of energy utilization and economic development in different provinces on human well-being are different. This study is of great significance to the related research aiming at improving people’s livelihood and promoting regional development. Full article
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14 pages, 939 KiB  
Article
The Political Economy of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs): Does Performance on the SDGs Affect Re-Election?
by Christian Kroll and Vera Zipperer
Sustainability 2020, 12(16), 6445; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12166445 - 10 Aug 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 3272
Abstract
While the economic voting hypothesis is a well-researched approach to explain behavior at the ballot box, a broader perspective of economic, social and environmental issues regarding a government’s chances to get re-elected is still missing in the literature. In this context, this paper [...] Read more.
While the economic voting hypothesis is a well-researched approach to explain behavior at the ballot box, a broader perspective of economic, social and environmental issues regarding a government’s chances to get re-elected is still missing in the literature. In this context, this paper makes use for the first time of the Agenda 2030 with its 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) as the comprehensive policy framework that all 193 UN member states have pledged to achieve. The objective of our study is therefore to examine the relationship between SDGs’ progress and the likelihood of re-election. Our analysis of 124 countries regarding performance on the SDGs over time and voting behavior shows: the chance to get re-elected as a government significantly increases for progress made towards SDG 5 (Gender Equality). Notable differences are also found for high-income vs. low-income countries. The fact that governments are rewarded at the ballot box for successful action towards gender equality is encouraging, while the mechanisms behind other SDG areas deserve more research. Full article
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