sustainability-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Smart Cities and Smart Villages and the Global Digital Transformation: Strategy and Community Engagement"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Urban and Rural Development".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 July 2022) | Viewed by 2760

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Anna Visvizi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Institute of International Studies (ISM), SGH Warsaw School of Economics, Al. Niepodległości 162, 02-554 Warsaw, Poland
2. Effat College of Business, Effat University, Jeddah 21551, Saudi Arabia
Interests: smart cities; smart villages; international political economy (IPE); information and communication technology (ICT)
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Several issues, processes, and developments shape the context in which smart cities and smart villages—and thus, also the corresponding research agenda and policy-making process—pragmatize. The frame for these developments is most profoundly shaped by the imperatives entailed in the United Nations (UN) Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) Agenda, in the set of the UN-driven “AI for Good” initiatives, and, in the broader sense, by the global digital transformation that sweeps across diverse issues, levels, and domains of the social reality and the policy-making process.

Against this backdrop, this Special Issue (SI) of Sustainability will focus on the most recent advances in smart cities and smart villages research to encourage, nourish, and promote the development of strategies conducive to smart cities’/villages’ sustainable growth and development in times of the global digital transformation. The key objectives of this SI are (i) to examine how advances in sophisticated information and communication technology (ICT) broaden the range of opportunities to develop sustainable development strategies for smart cities and smart villages at local, regional, and global levels and across issue areas; (ii) to identify the ways, methods, and strategies by means of which a variety of stakeholders (can) engage in the processes of co-creating and making smart cities and smart villages thrive, and how ICT weighs in these processes; (iii) to reflect on and to add to the interpretive lens and explanatory potential that are offered by the existing literature on the subject; (iv) to query whether best practice sharing and specific business and policy strategies might be helpful in boosting smart cities’ and smart villages’ sustainability and development.

Prof. Dr. Anna Visvizi
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • global digital transformation and smart cities research
  • global digital transformation and smart villages research
  • “AI for good” and smart city/smart village development
  • smart city/villages and the UN’s SDGs
  • ICT and community engagement in smart city/village development
  • ICT and the digital transition of cities/villages into smart city/smart village
  • challenges, caveats and problems relating to smart cities/villages development and functioning
  • smart cities/villages in the era of platform economy
  • smart cities/villages, competitiveness and economic growth
  • ICT and the provision services in smart cities/villages, e.g. healthcare, education, etc.
  • energy communities and smart cities/villages
  • data cooperatives and smart cities/villages
  • smart city strategy and community enegagement
  • smart village and community engagement
  • services provision and community engagement in smart city/village context
  • smart cities/villages in the Global South/North contexts
  • smart cities, smart communities in the aftermath of the Covid-19 pandemic

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
Dashboard as a Platform for Community Engagement in a City Development—A Review of Techniques, Tools and Methods
Sustainability 2022, 14(17), 10809; https://doi.org/10.3390/su141710809 - 30 Aug 2022
Viewed by 238
Abstract
A city should be planned to provide an appropriate amount and quality of public spaces, services, and mobility for any life activity. For citizens to be actively involved in improving the quality of the space around them and thus participate in shaping the [...] Read more.
A city should be planned to provide an appropriate amount and quality of public spaces, services, and mobility for any life activity. For citizens to be actively involved in improving the quality of the space around them and thus participate in shaping the place they live in, they need knowledge about the city and its strengths and weaknesses. They need access to data about the city in an easy-to-use and interpretable form through specific tools. An example is indicators, which present data about the city in different categories important for city development. Excellent tools for transferring information between a city and its citizens are new web-based solutions such as dashboards. This article reviews selected dashboards in terms of their thematic scope, the number of indicators presented, data sources and tools for data analysis and visualization. In the discussion, the main problems related to data publication, analytical tools and cartographic presentation are identified. The recommendations propose two dashboard models: simple and complex, depending on the purpose and needs of the user. Comparing the values of indicators in different areas of the city can contribute to increased active participation of residents and their involvement in decision making about their surroundings. A review of dashboards showed little use of the potential of IT and geo-analytical tools in building a real dialog with residents. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Geographical Distribution Characteristics of Ethnic-Minority Villages in Fujian and Their Relationship with Topographic Factors
Sustainability 2022, 14(13), 7727; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14137727 - 24 Jun 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 381
Abstract
The geographical distribution characteristics of villages characterised by ethnic minorities are determined by the selection of the site when the village was initially established. The location of inherited and well-preserved minority villages must be exceptionally compatible with the natural terrain, with a logical [...] Read more.
The geographical distribution characteristics of villages characterised by ethnic minorities are determined by the selection of the site when the village was initially established. The location of inherited and well-preserved minority villages must be exceptionally compatible with the natural terrain, with a logical relationship. Nonetheless, the issue of village location, which is directly related to the development of the features of the geographical distribution, has received little attention from scholars. The average nearest proximity index, Voronoi, kernel density analysis, proximity analysis, and the Geographical Detector (GeoDetector) were used to analyse the geographic distribution characteristics of villages and their correlation with terrain, as well as the difference between the influence of each terrain factor. The findings indicated the following. (1) The geographical distribution of minority villages in Fujian Province is of the agglomeration type, with a significant “mononuclear” feature, and the topography has a facilitating effect on the clustering distribution of villages. (2) The geographical distribution of minority villages in each city of Fujian Province coexisted with the agglomeration type and the dispersion type, and the role of topography in promoting the agglomeration-type distribution of villages was not affected by the distribution density of villages. (3) The site selection of Fujian-minority villages is characterised by medium altitude, moderate slope, sun exposure, and no obvious hydrophilicity. Minority villages are mainly located in areas with an elevation of 202–647 m; a slope of 6–15°; a flat land aspect with a south slope, southeast slope, or southwest slope; and distance of 500–1500 m from 5–20 m wide rivers of level 2. (4) The site selection of Fujian minority villages is influenced by various topographic factors, such as elevation, slope, aspect, river buffer, river width, and river level, among which river width has the most substantial effect. (5) All topographic factors have a two-factor enhancing relationship with each other, aspect and slope have the most substantial effect and play a dominant role in site selection. The research findings illuminate the internal logic of the geographical distribution differentiation of villages characterised by ethnic minorities, which is critical for promoting the protection of modern ethnic-minority villages. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
An Accident Detection and Classification System Using Internet of Things and Machine Learning towards Smart City
Sustainability 2022, 14(1), 210; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14010210 - 26 Dec 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1410
Abstract
Daily traffic accidents increase annually, causing a significant number of death and disability cases. Most of fatalities occur because of the late response to these emergency cases. The time after the traumatic injury is called the golden hour, where providing essential medical and [...] Read more.
Daily traffic accidents increase annually, causing a significant number of death and disability cases. Most of fatalities occur because of the late response to these emergency cases. The time after the traumatic injury is called the golden hour, where providing essential medical and surgical aid at that time increases the probability of saving human lives by one-third an average. Thus, the focus of this paper was to develop a system based on IoT for accident detection and classification. The system detects and classifies vehicle accidents based on severity level and reports the essential information about the accident to emergency services providers. The system consists of a microcontroller, GPS, and a group of sensors to determine different physical parameters related to vehicle motion. In addition, different types of machine learning classifiers were examined with the developed system to determine the most accurate classifier for the system. The classifiers are the Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM), Naive-Bayes Tree (NB), Decision Tree (DT), and Classification and Regression Trees (CART). The implementation of the system showed that GMM and CART models were better in terms of precision and recall. It was also shown that the severity of accidents depends mainly on the g-force value and fire occurrence. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop