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Digital Technologies for Sustainable Education

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Education and Approaches".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (26 March 2023) | Viewed by 49797

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Faculty of Education, Psychology and Art, University of Latvia, LV-1586 Riga, Latvia
Interests: virtual education; smart education; educational technologies for learning; educational robotics
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
1. Institute of International Studies (ISM), SGH Warsaw School of Economics, Al. Niepodległości 162, 02-554 Warsaw, Poland
2. Effat College of Business, Effat University, Jeddah 21551, Saudi Arabia
Interests: smart cities; smart villages; international political economy (IPE); information and communication technology (ICT)
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Faculty of Pedagogy, Psychology and Art, University of Latvia, LV-1586 Riga, Latvia‎
Interests: the history and philosophy of education and childhood; digital childhood; digital transformation of education; transversal competencies; critical thinking

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Education is currently undergoing a rapid transformation to meet the challenges and opportunities of digitalization. It is clear that as technology advances, it is increasingly being used in the educational environment to change different dimensions of the educational system. We currently know many different ways in which Advanced Learning Technologies (ALTs) can be used and will inevitably continue to expand and evolve as new technological solutions emerge. Advances in technology have made it possible for educatonal institutions to use digital learning materials, learning management systems, VR/AR solutions that help organize the study process, analyze data, and offer opportunities for all form of  learning. However, as technology advances further, the fact remains that this transformation process will be endless and that organizational forms of learning, the learning content to be mastered, and digital competences must be continuously developed to take full advantage of these advances and to ensure sustainable education. On the one hand, it may seem that technological solutions provide opportunities for learning whenever and wherever an individual wants, but on the other hand, it is clear that human learning is a purposeful process that is leading to the emergence of various challenges that demonstrate that technology and digital solutions alone do not impart learning. In order to harness the enormous potential of the use of technology, it is necessary to develop new and innovative pedagogical concepts to promote the use of technological advances to add value to student learning outcomes. It is also essential to create synergies between technology opportunities, education systems, curriculum provision and pedagogical strategies

These are all areas in which one has to work and study and be open to different opportunities while analyzing data and forecasting future trends in order to ensure sustainable education.

This special issue will be dedicated to topical issues of digital solutions for sustainable education learning. It will establish an environment where to discuss ideas, problems, challenges and innovative solutions for changes in education which are brought by advanced technologies.

Indicative topics of interest:

  • Education policies for digital transformation
  • Pedagogical solutions of technology enhanced learning
  • Distance and remote learning
  • Digital technologies and inclusive education
  • Cognitive processes in cyberspace
  • Socioemotional competencies in cyberspace
  • Technological solutions to support distance and remote learning
  • Academia-industry collaborations for digitalization of education
  • Shared curriculum and programs across scientific borders for sustainable education
  • Case studies of educational innovations
  • Gamification of education
  • Research methodology of digital transformations

Prof. Linda Daniela
Prof. Dr. Anna Visvizi 
Prof. Zanda Rubene
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • sustainable education
  • digital technologies
  • smart pedagogy
  • distance learning
  • remote learning
  • policy recommendation
  • research methodology

Published Papers (12 papers)

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Research

Jump to: Review

16 pages, 281 KiB  
Article
Development of Education Field Student Digital Competences—Student and Stakeholders’ Perspective
by Edīte Sarva, Gatis Lāma, Alise Oļesika, Linda Daniela and Zanda Rubene
Sustainability 2023, 15(13), 9895; https://doi.org/10.3390/su15139895 - 21 Jun 2023
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1605
Abstract
Alongside reading, writing, and numeracy digital literacy has become an increasingly crucial component of functional competences in the modern era. Digital competences are essential for educators who wish to stay updated with the changing needs of their students and the education sector. These [...] Read more.
Alongside reading, writing, and numeracy digital literacy has become an increasingly crucial component of functional competences in the modern era. Digital competences are essential for educators who wish to stay updated with the changing needs of their students and the education sector. These competences can help them engage their students better, improve their teaching effectiveness, and advance their careers. Considering the ongoing changes in both the field of education and the field of technologies, it is important to explore the current needs for improving digital competences of educators including students in the field of education, to provide them with the necessary support. This study aims to develop recommendations for improving digital competence of educators by combining students’ self-assessment through surveys with stakeholder opinions concerning digital competence development of educators ascertained in a focus group discussion. Results of the research reveal that education students do not have a statistically different self-assessment of their digital competences than students from other study fields. And although students evaluate their digital competences as high, stakeholders point out that there is a lack of digital competences to carry out technology-enhanced learning and a negative attitude towards digitalization of education among all educators’ age groups. Improving the availability of digital resources and technological support as well as incorporating organisational level strategies that require application and improvement of digital competence could remedy the issue. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Digital Technologies for Sustainable Education)
14 pages, 1652 KiB  
Article
The Impact of an Online Professional Development Course on Teachers’ Comprehension and Self-Efficacy in Developing Students’ Self-Regulated Learning Skills
by Inga Linde, Edite Sarva and Linda Daniela
Sustainability 2023, 15(12), 9408; https://doi.org/10.3390/su15129408 - 12 Jun 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2001
Abstract
The ongoing process of digitalisation requires teachers not only to use technologies in their lessons to provide high quality opportunities for learning, but also to learn through this format themselves. In recent years, a new competence-based curriculum has been implemented in Latvia, introducing [...] Read more.
The ongoing process of digitalisation requires teachers not only to use technologies in their lessons to provide high quality opportunities for learning, but also to learn through this format themselves. In recent years, a new competence-based curriculum has been implemented in Latvia, introducing new content and paying attention to self-regulated learning (SRL) as one of the transversal skills. This requires appropriate teacher professional development (TPD) and the implementation of various digital solutions in teaching and learning, especially since the COVID-19 pandemic. Considering the benefits of online learning and the importance of SRL skills for ensuring sustainable lifelong learning, an online TPD course was conducted to enhance teachers’ knowledge of SRL and self-efficacy in developing students’ SRL skills. The course was attended by 126 teachers of grades 7–12. The research analyses teachers’ self-evaluation of the impact of the online TPD course on their knowledge and skills in developing students’ SRL skills, and data prove that both teachers’ theoretical understanding and competence in developing students’ SRL skills can be significantly improved through this format of TPD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Digital Technologies for Sustainable Education)
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15 pages, 255 KiB  
Article
Challenges and Issues of Teaching and Learning during the Pandemic (COVID-19)
by Johanudin Lahap, Tuan Syaadah Tuan Hussin, Noraslinda Mohd Said, Hashim Fadzil Ariffin and Azila Azmi
Sustainability 2023, 15(8), 6543; https://doi.org/10.3390/su15086543 - 12 Apr 2023
Viewed by 1452
Abstract
This study is conducted to investigate the effectiveness and readiness of teaching and learning among students during the pandemic (COVID-19) towards the online learning among hospitality and tourism students. A quantitative method was employed and students from the Faculty of Hotel and Tourism [...] Read more.
This study is conducted to investigate the effectiveness and readiness of teaching and learning among students during the pandemic (COVID-19) towards the online learning among hospitality and tourism students. A quantitative method was employed and students from the Faculty of Hotel and Tourism Management Penang Campus were chosen as the target sample. The sample size for this study was 430 and a total of 360 questionnaires were successfully collected with the return rate of 83.72%. Descriptive analysis was used to interpret the demographic data, Pearson Correlation analysis was employed to examine the correlation among variables, and multiple regression analysis was used to measure the overall relationship between independent and dependent variables. From these analyses, the three (3) variables (social presence, cognitive presence, and teaching presence) were found to have positive relationships with a student’s learning experience. Overall, this study is important to fellow academicians, academic researchers, and practitioners in improving their methods of teaching and learning, assisting the students, and strengthening their teaching techniques in online learning. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Digital Technologies for Sustainable Education)
16 pages, 3742 KiB  
Article
Technology in Nature—mDGBL as a Successful Approach to Promote Complex Contents?
by Phillip T. Bengel and Carina Peter
Sustainability 2023, 15(1), 633; https://doi.org/10.3390/su15010633 - 30 Dec 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2522
Abstract
The central challenges of our time mostly share a high level of complexity, which makes them unsolvable by single-perspective approaches. To offer adolescents the educational concepts that enable them to take various perspectives, comprehend, and finally deal constructively with these problems, innovative measures [...] Read more.
The central challenges of our time mostly share a high level of complexity, which makes them unsolvable by single-perspective approaches. To offer adolescents the educational concepts that enable them to take various perspectives, comprehend, and finally deal constructively with these problems, innovative measures must be created. Additionally, the benefit of these measures must be shared equally by all learners, without being limited by their individual biographical or attitudinal characteristics. In this work, potential concepts were collected from geography education, technology education (TE), and education for sustainable development (ESD), and merged into a multi-perspective educational approach with mobile digital game-based learning (mDGBL) for the promotion of environmental and technology-related content. In the presented study, the accumulation of n = 94 Hessian students’ subject-specific knowledge (SSK) was evaluated in a comparative study with a control group, along with the potential influence of gender, age, and concept-related attitudes (CRA) in a longitudinal quantitative study. Firstly, in a study of this kind, in addition to the approach’s short-term success, the long-term effects on subject-specific knowledge were also tested. The results prove the full success of the innovative mDGBL intervention. There were strong immediate and long-lasting effects on participants’ SSK, measured right after and eight weeks after the intervention. It could be proven that, although there were partially significant gender differences in attitudes towards modern technologies, learning success was not influenced by gender, age, or any of the measured attitudinal dimensions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Digital Technologies for Sustainable Education)
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22 pages, 3229 KiB  
Article
Strategies for Using ICT Skills in Educational Systems for Sustainable Youth Employability in South Africa
by Abiodun Alao and Roelien Brink
Sustainability 2022, 14(24), 16513; https://doi.org/10.3390/su142416513 - 9 Dec 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2470
Abstract
Information and Communication Technology (ICT) can play a significant role in the socioeconomic development of many countries. Digitisation in South Africa has increased, and ICT skills are pivotal in the sustainability of youth employability in the labour market. Hence, ICT skills, soft, hard, [...] Read more.
Information and Communication Technology (ICT) can play a significant role in the socioeconomic development of many countries. Digitisation in South Africa has increased, and ICT skills are pivotal in the sustainability of youth employability in the labour market. Hence, ICT skills, soft, hard, and technical skills are required in government, private organisations, and businesses. This study aims to investigate possible ways educational systems can adopt ICT skills to improve youth employability in South Africa. This study examines the factors that affect youth employability such as lack of ICT skills, access, income, affordability, infrastructure, poverty gap, inequality, lack of education, lack of access to information, and high demand for IT skills expectations in organisations as among the challenges that hinder youth employability in the South African economy. We propose that educational institutions should incorporate practical pedagogy to prepare qualified youths for the labour market. This study focuses on using ICTs for the sustainable development of youth employability in South Africa. The Sustainable Livelihood Theory was used as the study framework while the quantitative method was used for the data collection process. The researchers used close-ended and open-ended questions to draft a questionnaire to gather data from 49 respondents. We triangulated the received data from youths living in the East Rand of Johannesburg. Results derived from the study show the significance of ICT skills in educational systems on youth employability. The practical implication of the study recommends that policymakers implement ICT skill strategies to support educational institutions to prepare youths for the labour market. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Digital Technologies for Sustainable Education)
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19 pages, 1594 KiB  
Article
Empirical Research on the Metaverse User Experience of Digital Natives
by Han Jin Lee and Hyun Hee Gu
Sustainability 2022, 14(22), 14747; https://doi.org/10.3390/su142214747 - 9 Nov 2022
Cited by 30 | Viewed by 5101
Abstract
The metaverse has been settled as a platform that is widely beloved by digital natives that are familiar with mobile devices and immersive contents. Thanks to the protocol enabling hedonic interaction, the user experience provides significant value from its communication, enabling learning experiences [...] Read more.
The metaverse has been settled as a platform that is widely beloved by digital natives that are familiar with mobile devices and immersive contents. Thanks to the protocol enabling hedonic interaction, the user experience provides significant value from its communication, enabling learning experiences anytime and anywhere. However, the research topics are focused on the promotions of technology development, marketing effects, and relevant investment consensus. Surprisingly, the biggest problem was the lack of research from the perspective of the young generation, who mainly use the metaverse. This paper intends to examine the usability of digital native participants in detail and suggest how immersive contents, usage environment, and interface aspects should be designed from their point of view. As a result, the significant engagement factors and improvements, through heuristic usability evaluation considering content and user control, were discovered from individual interviews. Conversely, the elements to be supplemented in user experience were derived from information architecture and usage environment categories. In conclusion, the theoretical basis of the empirical usability evaluation on metaverse platforms and following recommendations with practical implications could gain more importance from this research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Digital Technologies for Sustainable Education)
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18 pages, 2039 KiB  
Article
Developing and Comparing Indices to Evaluate Community Knowledge Building in an Educational Research Course
by Calixto Gutiérrez-Braojos, Linda Daniela, Jesús Montejo-Gámez and Francisco Aliaga
Sustainability 2022, 14(17), 10603; https://doi.org/10.3390/su141710603 - 25 Aug 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1468
Abstract
This paper implements a novel approach to analyzing the degree of Collective Cognitive Responsibility (CCR) in a Knowledge Building community, based on socioeconomic and scientometric measures. After engaging in Knowledge Forum (KF) discussions for one semester, 36 students identified impactful ideas in their [...] Read more.
This paper implements a novel approach to analyzing the degree of Collective Cognitive Responsibility (CCR) in a Knowledge Building community, based on socioeconomic and scientometric measures. After engaging in Knowledge Forum (KF) discussions for one semester, 36 students identified impactful ideas in their portfolios, which were then used to develop their impact scores. These scores were then transformed and plotted along the Lorenz Curve and the Gini coefficient to visualize the degree of equidistribution of recognition in the community and, by extension, the degree of collective responsibility shared by members of the community. Additionally, students were classified into member roles based on the impact of their contributions, and we explored the flow of member roles across several discussion topics, based on Price’s model of scientific production. Our results show convergence between peers’ and teachers’ ratings of impactful contributions, which both point to medium levels of collective responsibility in the community. In short, on the one hand, this procedure shows its sensitivity to detect communities that could not comply with the CCR principle. On the other hand, we discuss the necessity of reflective evaluation to address the pedagogical challenge of fostering collective responsibility for knowledge advancement and empowering novel students to take charge of their knowledge work at the highest levels. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Digital Technologies for Sustainable Education)
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14 pages, 3473 KiB  
Article
Students’ Perspective on Remote On-Line Teaching and Learning at the University of Latvia in the First and Second COVID-19 Period
by Sanita Baranova, Dita Nīmante, Daiga Kalniņa and Alise Oļesika
Sustainability 2021, 13(21), 11890; https://doi.org/10.3390/su132111890 - 27 Oct 2021
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 2651
Abstract
In Spring 2020, due to the rapid spread of COVID-19, all educational institutions in Latvia, including the University of Latvia (UL), transitioned from face-to-face on-site learning to remote learning. After a short period of face-to-face on-site learning in autumn, UL returned to remote [...] Read more.
In Spring 2020, due to the rapid spread of COVID-19, all educational institutions in Latvia, including the University of Latvia (UL), transitioned from face-to-face on-site learning to remote learning. After a short period of face-to-face on-site learning in autumn, UL returned to remote learning in November for the second time. This paper investigates the UL students’ perspectives on remote teaching and learning at the UL during the first and second COVID-19 periods. The research assesses several remote study organization aspects, including the lecturer’s and student’s digital skills, their access to information and support during the study process, planning and implementation of the study process, and students’ acquisition of the content. The study used an original questionnaire designed in the Spring 2020 semester. Seven questions from the first questionnaire were included in another follow-up questionnaire distributed in the Spring 2021 semester. A total of 2248 UL students from the Spring 2020 semester and 742 students from the Spring 2021 semester participated in the study, representing 13 faculties across all study levels. The survey responses were collected via a QuestionPro survey platform and then downloaded into an IBM SPSS 28 file for a reliability check. Next, descriptive statistical analyses were conducted for each reported survey item using Microsoft Excel 2016. The research presented here implies that, in general, students perceive positive improvements in almost all the investigated aspects of the organization of the remote study process when comparing the first and second COVID-19 periods, which could indicate a certain level of resilience in students and university lecturers when subject to COVID circumstances. However, the results reveal that students have, in one year, developed a more realistic approach in assessing their digital skills. The results lead us to believe that remote on-line learning is not just a short-term solution but could become a valuable element for providing qualitative education in the long term. It could indicate that the students and lecturers at university are ready for new and sustainable higher education study organization solutions in the future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Digital Technologies for Sustainable Education)
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19 pages, 1166 KiB  
Article
Determinants of Active Online Learning in the Smart Learning Environment: An Empirical Study with PLS-SEM
by Shaofeng Wang, Gaojun Shi, Mingjie Lu, Ruyi Lin and Junfeng Yang
Sustainability 2021, 13(17), 9923; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13179923 - 3 Sep 2021
Cited by 26 | Viewed by 5624
Abstract
A smart learning environment, featuring personalization, real-time feedback, and intelligent interaction, provides the primary conditions for actively participating in online education. Identifying the factors that influence active online learning in a smart learning environment is critical for proposing targeted improvement strategies and enhancing [...] Read more.
A smart learning environment, featuring personalization, real-time feedback, and intelligent interaction, provides the primary conditions for actively participating in online education. Identifying the factors that influence active online learning in a smart learning environment is critical for proposing targeted improvement strategies and enhancing their active online learning effectiveness. This study constructs the research framework of active online learning with theories of learning satisfaction, the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM), and a smart learning environment. We hypothesize that the following factors will influence active online learning: Typical characteristics of a smart learning environment, perceived usefulness and ease of use, social isolation, learning expectations, and complaints. A total of 528 valid questionnaires were collected through online platforms. The partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) analysis using SmartPLS 3 found that: (1) The personalization, intelligent interaction, and real-time feedback of the smart learning environment all have a positive impact on active online learning; (2) the perceived ease of use and perceived usefulness in the technology acceptance model (TAM) positively affect active online learning; (3) innovatively discovered some new variables that affect active online learning: Learning expectations positively impact active online learning, while learning complaints and social isolation negatively affect active online learning. Based on the results, this study proposes the online smart teaching model and discusses how to promote active online learning in a smart environment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Digital Technologies for Sustainable Education)
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14 pages, 1784 KiB  
Article
Self-Assessment of the Entrepreneurial Competence of Teacher Education Students in the Remote Study Process
by Agnese Slišāne, Gatis Lāma and Zanda Rubene
Sustainability 2021, 13(11), 6424; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13116424 - 4 Jun 2021
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 2858
Abstract
Competence-based education has been in the spotlight for several years, and it is a topical issue in the European Union as well as marking the reform of the Latvian education system. The Council of the EU considers entrepreneurial competence to be one of [...] Read more.
Competence-based education has been in the spotlight for several years, and it is a topical issue in the European Union as well as marking the reform of the Latvian education system. The Council of the EU considers entrepreneurial competence to be one of the key competences for lifelong learning, and Latvia’s school reforms require teachers to create a study process where students develop entrepreneurial competence. This publication presents research on the self-assessed entrepreneurial competence of teacher education students to find out whether there is any correlation between their assessment of entrepreneurial competence and their readiness/ability to develop this competence in their students, as well as which methods/activities they see as suitable to do so in the classroom and the remote study process. An online survey using the QuestionPro platform was used to collect the data. The questionnaire was fully completed by 157 pedagogy students from various higher education institutions, and it consisted of four question blocks: demographic and socio-cultural questions, entrepreneurial competence, digital competence, and open-ended questions. The data provided by the questionnaire developed for this research showed that students’ self-assessed entrepreneurial competence in a remote study process rated their digital competences highest, followed by their entrepreneurial competences. The results indicate that students are sufficiently prepared to be able to further develop their entrepreneurial competence in the remote study process. From the data, it can be concluded that higher education needs to focus on the development of entrepreneurial competence and should also supplement the methodological knowledge of students to improve their readiness to teach entrepreneurial competences to others. It should also be noted that there is a strong correlation between students’ entrepreneurial competence and their readiness to teach entrepreneurial competences to others. An online survey using the QuestionPro platform was used to collect the data. The questionnaire was fully completed by 157 pedagogy students from various higher education institutions, and it consisted of four question blocks: demographic and socio-cultural questions, entrepreneurial competence, digital competence, and open-ended questions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Digital Technologies for Sustainable Education)
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12 pages, 894 KiB  
Article
Parents’ Perspectives on Remote Learning in the Pandemic Context
by Linda Daniela, Zanda Rubene and Arta Rūdolfa
Sustainability 2021, 13(7), 3640; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13073640 - 25 Mar 2021
Cited by 32 | Viewed by 9089
Abstract
In the spring of 2020, when the entire education system worldwide switched to distance learning, parents became key learning agents, helping students to understand how to continue learning, how to use digital solutions and how to support students in this process. This article [...] Read more.
In the spring of 2020, when the entire education system worldwide switched to distance learning, parents became key learning agents, helping students to understand how to continue learning, how to use digital solutions and how to support students in this process. This article summarizes parents’ views on the distance learning process and the challenges they faced. This is part of a larger study carried out within the project “Life with COVID-19: Evaluation of the overcoming coronavirus crisis in Latvia and recommendations for social resilience in the future” (CoLife), which was launched in Latvia in the summer of 2020 and analyzed what digital learning tools schools can use to support students in their learning. Parents’ views on 738 school-age children (313 responses about 1st–4th graders; 362 responses for 5th–9th graders and 63 responses for 10th–12th graders) were obtained, and the main conclusions were that after parents became learning agents, they would have liked more support from educators to understand how to support their children in the learning process. Parents would also have liked schools to be interested in how their children are doing and whether everything necessary is available. Overall, it can be concluded that in this crisis, parents tried to support their children, and in most cases, it was the mothers of the students who provided this support, but it was primarily based on the need to use digital technologies, which means that children whose parents do not use digital technologies may be more exposed to the danger of falling into a risk group with larger educational gaps. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Digital Technologies for Sustainable Education)
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Review

Jump to: Research

19 pages, 1831 KiB  
Review
Virtual Reality and Metacognition Training Techniques for Learning Disabilities
by Athanasios Drigas, Eleni Mitsea and Charalabos Skianis
Sustainability 2022, 14(16), 10170; https://doi.org/10.3390/su141610170 - 16 Aug 2022
Cited by 36 | Viewed by 10073
Abstract
The current research aims to investigate the effectiveness of brain-rewiring techniques applied in virtual reality environments as a pioneer intervention for people with learning disabilities and various disorders. In addition, we examine whether these VR-assisted techniques can improve metacognitive skills. Specifically, we emphasize [...] Read more.
The current research aims to investigate the effectiveness of brain-rewiring techniques applied in virtual reality environments as a pioneer intervention for people with learning disabilities and various disorders. In addition, we examine whether these VR-assisted techniques can improve metacognitive skills. Specifically, we emphasize the advantage of VR clinical hypnosis, VR neurolinguistic programming, VR subliminal training, VR fast learning, VR mindfulness, and VR breathing training. The results of this review study revealed that virtual reality provides a fertile ground for the practice of therapeutic metacognitive techniques. In addition, experimental research revealed beneficial effects on learning disabilities, cognitive impairments, autism, ADHD (attention deficit hyperactivity disorder), depression, generalized anxiety disorder, phobias, and behavioral and emotional disorders. It was revealed that VR brain-rewiring techniques constitute effective metacognitive strategies for people with various disorders. Therapists, educators, parents, and even patients could utilize VR brain-rewiring techniques at home, at school, or in the workplace to train the 21st-century meta-abilities. This study also highlights the need to create virtual metacognitive training environments to accelerate inclusion, equity, and peak performance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Digital Technologies for Sustainable Education)
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