sustainability-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Gender Issues in Transport and Mobility"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Transportation".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 May 2021) | Viewed by 8956

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Pierluigi Coppola
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Politecnico di Milano, 20156 Milano, Italy
Interests: sustainable urban mobility planning; travel demand forecasting; transport modeling
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Ms. Ines. Kawgan-Kagan
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
AEM Institute, Berlin, Germany
Interests: gender and sustainable Mobility

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

To prioritize climate protection, social justice, and safe mobility in public spaces, it is crucial to understand and consider different user groups. As gender is one of the strongest determinants for individual mode choices and daily trip chains, gender differences are still hardly considered when relevant decisions are made. Although the gender mobility gap has been researched for decades, many underlying reasons stay hidden and known issues do not find their way into mobility planning.

The gender mobility gap can only be overcome with gender-sensitive data and statistics, mobility innovations that include different perspectives on transport requirements, desires and needs and, finally, recommendations for policy measures to be included in mobility planning.

With this Special Issue, we are looking for contributions that advance the research of gender and mobility. We do not aim to re-discover the known gender mobility gap; we are especially looking for findings regarding unresearched fields and concepts to implement findings into the field of transport and mobility planning, offering policy recommendations. The topics are as follows:

  • Differences in specific aspects of transport behaviour such as cycling, leisure activities and/or commuting;
  • Addressing safety issues that occur because of the different physiologies of women and men;
  • Gender-sensitive data collection and analysis in mobility and transport;
  • Best practice implementations and policy recommendations for inclusive transport systems;
  • Gender issues regarding innovative mobility offers such as MaaS, micromobility or shared mobility.

Prof. Dr. Pierluigi Coppola
Ms. Ines. Kawgan-Kagan
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • gender-specific needs
  • women in transport
  • gender analysis methods
  • transport equity assessment
  • social inclusion and fairness in transport

Published Papers (5 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Article
Leisure Quality among German Parents—Exploring Urbanity, Mobility, and Partner Interaction as Determinants
Sustainability 2021, 13(11), 5883; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13115883 - 24 May 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 693
Abstract
Individuals with family obligations concurrently perform unpaid tasks. In particular, parents often multitask childcare during leisure, leading to low-quality leisure. In this study, we explored leisure quality by measuring pure and contaminated (i.e., leisure combined with childcare) leisure for German parents (lone versus [...] Read more.
Individuals with family obligations concurrently perform unpaid tasks. In particular, parents often multitask childcare during leisure, leading to low-quality leisure. In this study, we explored leisure quality by measuring pure and contaminated (i.e., leisure combined with childcare) leisure for German parents (lone versus partnered) by considering five diverse factors: demographics, job characteristics, spatial and travel attributes, time use perception/preferences, and gendering of partner interactions. We used the cross-sectional German Time Use Survey 2012/13 data and employed regression analysis. Four important findings of the study are: (a) across groups, women have the highest levels of contaminated leisure, while men have the highest levels of pure leisure; (b) for both lone and partnered respondents, spatial attributes (less dense residential areas), travel attributes (paid work trips, unpaid work trips, number of cars, travel by public transport) negatively determine both pure and contaminated leisure; (c) for partnered respondents, driving is positively associated with contaminated leisure; (d) partner’s time spent on childcare negatively affects women’s pure leisure but positively relates to their contaminated leisure, while partner’s time spent on leisure activities positively affects men’s pure leisure and contaminated leisure. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gender Issues in Transport and Mobility)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Gender Inequality in Safety and Security Perceptions in Railway Stations
Sustainability 2021, 13(7), 4007; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13074007 - 03 Apr 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1627
Abstract
Recent studies have shown that gender is the personal aspect that mostly affects mobility patterns and travel behaviors. It has been observed, for instance, that female perception of unsafety and insecurity when traveling using public transport forces them to make unwanted travel choices, [...] Read more.
Recent studies have shown that gender is the personal aspect that mostly affects mobility patterns and travel behaviors. It has been observed, for instance, that female perception of unsafety and insecurity when traveling using public transport forces them to make unwanted travel choices, such as avoiding traveling at certain times of day and to specific destinations. In order to improve the attractiveness of public transport services, this gender gap must not be overlooked. This paper aims at contributing to research in gendered mobility by investigating differences in safety and security perceptions in railway stations, and by identifying which policies could be effective in bridging any existing gap. The methodology includes the collection of disaggregate data through a mixed Revealed Preference/Stated Preference survey, and the estimation of fixed and random parameters behavioral models. Results from a medium-sized Italian railway station show that female travelers feel safer in the presence of other people; they prefer intermodal infrastructures close to the entrance of the station and commercial activities in the internal premises. Moreover, unlike male travelers, they do not appreciate the presence of hedges and greenery outside stations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gender Issues in Transport and Mobility)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
A Preliminary Analysis on Gender Aspects in Transport Systems and Mobility Services: Presentation of a Survey Design
Sustainability 2021, 13(5), 2676; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13052676 - 02 Mar 2021
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 1686
Abstract
As sustainability is becoming a common practice in planning transport systems and mobility services, the designation and management of gender issues are of paramount importance. TInnGO is a European Project that has developed a network of 10 national Hubs to build the capacity [...] Read more.
As sustainability is becoming a common practice in planning transport systems and mobility services, the designation and management of gender issues are of paramount importance. TInnGO is a European Project that has developed a network of 10 national Hubs to build the capacity to generate and apply evidence on gender equality and transport issues at the European level. This paper presents the project activities by introducing a relevant framework and exploring user mobility experiences based on gender to identify diversified needs and requirements. This process relies on the combination of a review of current gender-oriented experiences and practices in mobility with focus group activities conducted in four different EU cities. The insights obtained from these activities supported the design of a survey to collect information on socioeconomic, personal, and operational aspects to serve a gender-oriented transport analysis for all the Hubs. These preliminary analyses identified the main issues related to the female mobility experience, namely safety, security, accessibility, and transport reliability. Future research on the data collected through the survey would help operators in successfully improving their mobility offer to women. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gender Issues in Transport and Mobility)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Challenges and Strategies for Post-COVID-19 Gender Equity and Sustainable Mobility
Sustainability 2021, 13(5), 2510; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13052510 - 26 Feb 2021
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 2609
Abstract
The COVID-19 pandemic has forced countries around the world to take unprecedented measures to contain it. In particular, its impact on mobility has been enormous, causing a sudden decrease in the number of trips and changes in the choice and use of modes [...] Read more.
The COVID-19 pandemic has forced countries around the world to take unprecedented measures to contain it. In particular, its impact on mobility has been enormous, causing a sudden decrease in the number of trips and changes in the choice and use of modes of transport. Furthermore, the effects of this health crisis on the social and economic spheres have aggravated inequalities between population groups, with women being one of the most affected groups, which may accentuate the already known gender gap in mobility. Based on these premises, we carried out a strategic analysis of urban mobility from the perspective of sustainability and gender equity in the context of the pandemic, identifying a set of effective strategies to address the post-COVID-19 urban mobility scenario. To this end, based on the review of the literature and expert opinions, we carried out a Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats (SWOT) analysis that allowed us to formulate 16 strategies after careful consideration of the weaknesses, strengths, threats and opportunities encountered. Our results provide useful recommendations for making successful policy decisions on post-COVID-19 mobility planning towards a more sustainable, equitable and safe model. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gender Issues in Transport and Mobility)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Review
Women in Transport Research and Innovation: A European Perspective
Sustainability 2021, 13(12), 6796; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13126796 - 16 Jun 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 969
Abstract
Several gender differences exist in the transport sector. These include accessibility to transport modes, safety and security when travelling, and the participation of women in transport research and innovation (R&I). In order to achieve sustainable and inclusive transport, planners and policymakers should consider [...] Read more.
Several gender differences exist in the transport sector. These include accessibility to transport modes, safety and security when travelling, and the participation of women in transport research and innovation (R&I). In order to achieve sustainable and inclusive transport, planners and policymakers should consider all impacts on gender equality. This paper sheds light on two main issues which interconnect through the decision-making process. The first relates to women’s behaviour in the transport system (i.e., studies the gender mobility gap). The second concerns the role of women in transport R&I, particularly the topics covered by research projects and relevant descriptive statistics of their participation in the sector. Based on a literature review, this paper identifies critical issues in the European transport sector and key European Union policy initiatives and regulations that address gender equality and transport. The European Commission’s Transport Research and Innovation Monitoring and Information System (TRIMIS) is used to summarise the status and evolution of European research in addressing women’s issues in transport. It also analyses the participation of women in European transport research and innovation activities. The paper assesses progress to date and identifies challenges and opportunities for women, mobility, and transport. It concludes by providing policy recommendations to overcome the major barriers to gender equality in the European transport sector and to transport research and innovation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gender Issues in Transport and Mobility)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop