sustainability-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Energy Transition and Climate Change in Decision-making Processes"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Energy Sustainability".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2021) | Viewed by 17232

Printed Edition Available!
A printed edition of this Special Issue is available here.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Georgios Tsantopoulos
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Forestry and Management of the Environment and Natural Resources, Democritus University of Thrace, 193 Pantazidou, Orestiada, 68200, Greece
Interests: environmental policy; environmental education; environmental communication; environmental awareness
Mrs. Evangelia Karasmanaki
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Department of Forestry and Management of the Environment and Natural Resources, Democritus University of Thrace, 193 Pantazidou, Orestiada, 68200, Greece
Interests: environmental communication; environmental policy; environmental awareness

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

There has recently been growing concern about the climate, and numerous voices have stressed that, in order to overcome the climate crisis, the transition to a low-carbon society is the most reasonable path to follow. In this type of society, individuals would be characterized by mindful efforts to drastically decrease carbon and greenhouse gas emissions, and promote benign energy sources. Nevertheless, in order to facilitate this transition, it is deemed necessary that the relevant decision-making processes integrate a social perspective. This is because the public can often affect actions aimed at realizing this transition. To avoid complications and reinforce the transition efforts, public attitudes towards energy transition and climate change must be studied and analysed. In other words, the knowledge of public attitudes can be used as a roadmap to design effective decision-making processes or to enhance the existing ones.

Against this background, we invite scholars and practitioners conducting research in the areas of climate change and energy transition to submit their work to this Special Issue. The Issue will include, but will not be limited to, the following topics. We welcome researchers who carry out social, economic, and technological studies to contribute to this Issue in order to establish a valuable source of information that can be used to enhance decision-making processes, which, in turn, can turn the energy transition into reality. In specific, we welcome research works that measure environmental awareness among various social groups in developed and developing countries. In addition, we are interested in studies on public responses to renewable and non-renewable energy sources. We would also like to include research works analysing the economic impacts of the energy transition and works evaluating the technological performance of renewable systems, as well as studies assessing different models of environmental policy. Original papers related to the above topics and dealing, generally, with methodologies, numerical and experimental investigations, and case-studies addressing energy transition and climate change are welcome. Finally, we encourage the authors who will submit their papers to the Special Issue to discuss the ways in which their findings could be used to effectively improve existing decision-making processes or establish new forms of processes. 

Prof. Dr. Georgios Tsantopoulos
Mrs. Evangelia Karasmanaki
Guest Editors

References:

  1. Adua, L., York, R., & Schuelke-Leech, B. A. (2016). The human dimensions of climate change: A micro-level assessment of views from the ecological modernization, political economy and human ecology perspectives. Social Science Research56, 26-43.
  2. Brisbois, M. C. (2019). Powershifts: A framework for assessing the growing impact of decentralized ownership of energy transitions on political decision-making. Energy Research & Social Science50, 151-161.
  3. Dittrich, R., Wreford, A., & Moran, D. (2016). A survey of decision-making approaches for climate change adaptation: Are robust methods the way forward?. Ecological Economics122, 79-89.
  4. Hazboun, S. O., Briscoe, M., Givens, J., & Krannich, R. (2019). Keep quiet on climate: Assessing public response to seven renewable energy frames in the Western United States. Energy Research & Social Science57, 101243.
  5. Ioannou, K., Tsantopoulos, G., & Arabatzis, G. (2019). A Decision Support System methodology for selecting wind farm installation locations using AHP and TOPSIS: Case study in Eastern Macedonia and Thrace region, Greece. Energy Policy132, 232-246.
  6. Karasmanaki, E., & Tsantopoulos, G. (2019). Exploring future scientists' awareness about and attitudes towards renewable energy sources. Energy Policy131, 111-119.
  7. Kardooni, R., Yusoff, S. B., Kari, F. B., & Moeenizadeh, L. (2018). Public opinion on renewable energy technologies and climate change in Peninsular Malaysia. Renewable energy116, 659-668.
  8. Lefkeli, S., Manolas, E., Ioannou, K., & Tsantopoulos, G. (2018). Socio-cultural impact of energy saving: Studying the behaviour of elementary school students in Greece. Sustainability10(3), 737.
  9. McCormick, K., & Kautto, N. (2013). The bioeconomy in Europe: An overview. Sustainability5(6), 2589-2608.

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Public opinion
  • Climate change
  • Energy transition
  • Renewable energy sources
  • Decision-making processes
  • Environmental education
  • Environmental communication
  • Low-carbon society

Published Papers (17 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Editorial

Jump to: Research, Review

Editorial
Energy Transition and Climate Change in Decision-Making Processes
Sustainability 2021, 13(23), 13404; https://doi.org/10.3390/su132313404 - 03 Dec 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 367
Abstract
Humans have been using fossil fuels for centuries, and the development of fossil fuel technology reshaped society in lasting ways [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Energy Transition and Climate Change in Decision-making Processes)

Research

Jump to: Editorial, Review

Article
Assessment of the Greek National Plan of Energy and Climate Change—Critical Remarks
Sustainability 2021, 13(23), 13143; https://doi.org/10.3390/su132313143 - 27 Nov 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 601
Abstract
The Greek National Energy and Climate Plan was validated by the Greek Governmental Committee of Economic Policy on 23 December 2019. The decisions included in this plan will have a significant impact on the Greek energy mix as the production of electricity from [...] Read more.
The Greek National Energy and Climate Plan was validated by the Greek Governmental Committee of Economic Policy on 23 December 2019. The decisions included in this plan will have a significant impact on the Greek energy mix as the production of electricity from lignite combustion ceases in 2028, when lignite will be replaced by natural gas (NG) and renewable energy sources (RES). This work presents an assessment of the Greek National Energy and Climate Plan by analyzing its pros and cons. The main critiques made are focused on the absence of risk analysis and alternative scenarios, the proposed energy mix, the absence of other alternatives on the energy mix and energy storage, the low attention given to energy savings (transport, buildings), the future energy prices, and the economic and social impacts. This analysis shows that delaying this transition for some years, to better prepare it by taking into consideration the most sustainable paths for that transition, such as using more alternatives, is the best available option today. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Energy Transition and Climate Change in Decision-making Processes)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Selection of Renewable Energy in Rural Area Via Life Cycle Assessment-Analytical Hierarchy Process (LCA-AHP): A Case Study of Tatau, Sarawak
Sustainability 2021, 13(21), 11880; https://doi.org/10.3390/su132111880 - 27 Oct 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 686
Abstract
With a growing global population and energy demand, there is increasing concern about the world’s reliance on fossil fuels, which have a negative impact on the climate, necessitating the immediate transition to a cleaner energy resource. This effort can be initiated in the [...] Read more.
With a growing global population and energy demand, there is increasing concern about the world’s reliance on fossil fuels, which have a negative impact on the climate, necessitating the immediate transition to a cleaner energy resource. This effort can be initiated in the rural areas of developing countries for a sustainable, efficient and affordable energy source. This study evaluated four types of renewable energy (solar, wind, biomass, and mini-hydro energy) using the integrated Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) and Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) approaches to select the best renewable energy source in Tatau, Sarawak. The criteria under consideration in this study included the environment, engineering and economics. The LCA was used to assess the environmental impact of renewable energies from gate-to-grave boundaries based on 50 MJ/day of electricity generation. The AHP results showed that solar energy received the highest score of 0.299 in terms of the evaluated criteria, followed by mini-hydro, biomass and wind energy, which received scores of 0.271, 0.230 and 0.200, respectively. These findings can be used to develop a systematic procedure for determining the best form of renewable energy for rural areas. This approach could be vital for the authorities that are responsible for breaking down multi-perspective criteria for future decision making in the transition into renewable energy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Energy Transition and Climate Change in Decision-making Processes)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Efficiency Enhancement of Gas Turbine Systems with Air Injection Driven by Natural Gas Turboexpanders
Sustainability 2021, 13(19), 10994; https://doi.org/10.3390/su131910994 - 03 Oct 2021
Viewed by 768
Abstract
The fuel source of many simple and combined-cycle power plants usually comes from a nearby natural gas transmission pipeline at a pressure from 50 to over 70 bar. The use of a turboexpander instead of throttling equipment offers a promising alternative to regulate [...] Read more.
The fuel source of many simple and combined-cycle power plants usually comes from a nearby natural gas transmission pipeline at a pressure from 50 to over 70 bar. The use of a turboexpander instead of throttling equipment offers a promising alternative to regulate the pressure of natural gas introduced to the power plant. Specifically, it helps recover part of the available energy of the compressed gas in the transmission pipeline, increase the power output and efficiency of the gas turbine system, and decrease the fuel use and harmful emissions. In this paper, the addition of such a turboexpander in a gas pressure-reduction station is studied. The recovered power is then used to drive the compression of extra air added to the combustion chamber of a heavy-duty gas turbine. The performance of this configuration is analyzed for a wide range of ambient temperatures using energy and exergy analyses. Fuel energy recovered in this way increases the output power and the efficiency of the gas turbine system by a minimum of 2.5 MW and 0.25%, respectively. The exergy efficiency of the gas turbine system increases by approximately 0.36% and the annual CO2 emissions decrease by 1.3% per MW. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Energy Transition and Climate Change in Decision-making Processes)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
South Korean Public Acceptance of the Fuel Transition from Coal to Natural Gas in Power Generation
Sustainability 2021, 13(19), 10787; https://doi.org/10.3390/su131910787 - 28 Sep 2021
Viewed by 587
Abstract
South Korea has set up a plan to convert 24 coal-fired power plants into natural gas-fired ones by 2034 in order to reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. This fuel transition can succeed only if it receives the public support. This article [...] Read more.
South Korea has set up a plan to convert 24 coal-fired power plants into natural gas-fired ones by 2034 in order to reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. This fuel transition can succeed only if it receives the public support. This article seeks to investigate the public acceptance of the fuel transition. For this purpose, data on South Koreans’ acceptance of the fuel transition were gathered on a nine-point scale from a survey of 1000 people using face-to-face individual interviews with skilled interviewers visiting households. The factors affecting acceptance were identified and examined using an ordered probit model. Of all the interviewees, 73.6 percent agreed with and 12.2 percent opposed the fuel transition, respectively, agreement being about six times greater than opposition. The model secured statistical significance and various findings emerged. For example, people living in the Seoul Metropolitan area, people who use electricity for heating, people with a low education level, young people, and high-income people were more receptive of the fuel transition than others. Moreover, several implications arose from the survey in terms of enhancing acceptance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Energy Transition and Climate Change in Decision-making Processes)
Article
Towards a Territorially Just Climate Transition—Assessing the Swedish EU Territorial Just Transition Plan Development Process
Sustainability 2021, 13(13), 7505; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13137505 - 05 Jul 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1593
Abstract
The move towards a climate neutral economy and society requires policymakers and practitioners to carefully consider the core technical, social, and spatial dimensions of a just transition. This paper closely examines the processes undertaken during the development of EU Territorial Just Transition Plans [...] Read more.
The move towards a climate neutral economy and society requires policymakers and practitioners to carefully consider the core technical, social, and spatial dimensions of a just transition. This paper closely examines the processes undertaken during the development of EU Territorial Just Transition Plans (TJTPs) for the three Swedish regions of Gotland, Norrbotten, and Västra Götaland. The aim is to establish whether the content and actions outlined in the TJTPs were driven by the technical, social, or spatial dimensions of a just transition. The analysis is primarily based on a socio-economic and governance impact assessment conducted in each region as part of the TJTP formulation process. These data are also supported by observations of the TJTP development process by the article authors who were part of the team put together by DG Reform to work with the preparation of the TJTPs. The paper finds that the TJTPs development process was largely driven by technical considerations, rather than spatial and socio-economic issues. This indicates that a more open and inclusive place-based territorial approach to climate transition policy formulation and implementation is required. A balance between the technical, social, and spatial elements of a just transition is needed if policies are going to meet the requirements of local and regional citizens and provide sustainable socio-economic growth and environmental protection, without risks of delocalizing energy-intensive processes to other regions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Energy Transition and Climate Change in Decision-making Processes)
Article
Automatic Detection of Photovoltaic Farms Using Satellite Imagery and Convolutional Neural Networks
Sustainability 2021, 13(9), 5323; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13095323 - 10 May 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1034
Abstract
The number of solar photovoltaic (PV) arrays in Greece has increased rapidly during the recent years. As a result, there is an increasing need for high quality updated information regarding the status of PV farms. This information includes the number of PV farms, [...] Read more.
The number of solar photovoltaic (PV) arrays in Greece has increased rapidly during the recent years. As a result, there is an increasing need for high quality updated information regarding the status of PV farms. This information includes the number of PV farms, power capacity and the energy generated. However, access to this data is obsolete, mainly due to the fact that there is a difficulty tracking PV investment status (from licensing to investment completion and energy production). This article presents a novel approach, which uses free access high resolution satellite imagery and a deep learning algorithm (a convolutional neural network—CNN) for the automatic detection of PV farms. Furthermore, in an effort to create an algorithm capable of generalizing better, all the current locations with installed PV farms (data provided from the Greek Energy Regulator Authority) in the Greek Territory (131,957 km2) were used. According to our knowledge this is the first time such an algorithm is used in order to determine the existence of PV farms and the results showed satisfying accuracy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Energy Transition and Climate Change in Decision-making Processes)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Improving Energy Efficiency in Buildings Using an Interactive Mathematical Programming Approach
Sustainability 2021, 13(8), 4436; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13084436 - 15 Apr 2021
Viewed by 611
Abstract
Improving energy efficiency in buildings is a major priority and challenge worldwide. The employed measures vary in nature, and the decision analyst, who is typically the architect, the engineer, or the building expert that has undertaken the task to suggest energy efficient solutions, [...] Read more.
Improving energy efficiency in buildings is a major priority and challenge worldwide. The employed measures vary in nature, and the decision analyst, who is typically the architect, the engineer, or the building expert that has undertaken the task to suggest energy efficient solutions, faces a complex decision problem comprising numerous decision variables and multiple, usually competitive objectives. The solution of such multi-objective problems typically involves some sort of objectives aggregation, which reflects the preferences of the involved final decision maker that is the building’s user, occupant, and/or owner. The preferences elicitation, however, is a difficult task, and this paper aims to provide an interactive framework that will allow their consideration in a relatively easy manner. More specifically, a mathematical programming approach is proposed herein, which allows the elicitation and incorporation of the decision maker’s preferences in the decision model via the assessment of his/her utility function with the assistance of the multicriteria decision aid method UTASTAR. To study the feasibility and efficiency of the proposed approach, the case of a simple building is examined as an application example. The study results suggest that the proposed approach is capable of helping the decision analyst to suggest energy measures that satisfy, as much as possible, the decision maker’s preferences, without having to precisely prescribe them beforehand. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Energy Transition and Climate Change in Decision-making Processes)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Is Environment a Strategic Priority of the Leading Energy Companies? Evidence from Mission Statements
Sustainability 2021, 13(4), 2192; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13042192 - 18 Feb 2021
Viewed by 1063
Abstract
Hydrocarbon production, electricity transmission, and other energy-related activities affect the environment. It is expected that environmental issues can be among strategic priorities summarized in mission statements of energy companies. The present analysis of the mission statements of 43 leading energy companies implies that [...] Read more.
Hydrocarbon production, electricity transmission, and other energy-related activities affect the environment. It is expected that environmental issues can be among strategic priorities summarized in mission statements of energy companies. The present analysis of the mission statements of 43 leading energy companies implies that these issues are considered by 36% of the top energy companies and 37% of the fastest-growing energy companies. These considerations often co-occur with attention to a company’s higher tasks and image. Most often, production ecologization is posed as a priority. The fastest-growing companies pay insufficient attention to climate changes. Conceptually, reflection of environmental issues in mission statements depends on the managerial awareness of these issues; additionally, the development of separate sustainability strategies may make environmental priorities somewhat marginal. The ‘greening’ of mission statements of energy companies is recommended. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Energy Transition and Climate Change in Decision-making Processes)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Optimizing Treatment of Cesspool Wastewater at an Activated Sludge Plant
Sustainability 2020, 12(23), 10196; https://doi.org/10.3390/su122310196 - 07 Dec 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 720
Abstract
The purpose of this work was to determine the optimal percentage of wastewater from cesspool in the mixture of wastes subjected to treatment processes, which will not have a negative impact on the functioning of the collective treatment plant. The study was carried [...] Read more.
The purpose of this work was to determine the optimal percentage of wastewater from cesspool in the mixture of wastes subjected to treatment processes, which will not have a negative impact on the functioning of the collective treatment plant. The study was carried out over a period of two years, with 48 samples of wastewater flowing in from the sewage network and delivered with the slurry tanker collected and subjected to physical and chemical analysis. The analysis included: Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD5), Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD), and Total Nitrogen (TN). In addition, the study defined the daily balance of the amount of inflowing and transported wastewater. Based on the analysis carried out, it was found that the unit loads of BOD5, COD and TN in the mixture of wastewater subjected to the treatment process will be at the level of loads assumed in the project, when the share of supplied wastewater, i.e., from cesspool, will be at the level of 5% of the total amount of wastewater. Considering that in the analysed period the total average daily amount of wastewater subjected to the treatment process was 253.5 m3·d−1, the optimal amount of wastewater delivered should be 12.7 m3 in each day of the week. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Energy Transition and Climate Change in Decision-making Processes)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Are Global Companies Better in Environmental Efficiency in India? Based on Metafrontier Malmquist CO2 Performance
Sustainability 2020, 12(20), 8359; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12208359 - 12 Oct 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 953
Abstract
There is a rapid increase in inflows of foreign direct investment (FDI) into developing countries such as India. Some researchers argue that FDI has a positive impact on sustainable development in terms of environmental efficiency and brings innovative green technology to the host [...] Read more.
There is a rapid increase in inflows of foreign direct investment (FDI) into developing countries such as India. Some researchers argue that FDI has a positive impact on sustainable development in terms of environmental efficiency and brings innovative green technology to the host country. In contrast, others claim that FDI brings considerable pollution to the host country, and their motive is only to yield profit. To address this issue, this paper analyzes environmental efficiency between FDI and domestic firms in India for seven years between 2012 and 2018. The research aims to evaluate the performance of FDI firms in terms of environmental efficiency in India after implementing certain policy regulations, nationally and globally. In this analysis, we use the non-radial metafrontier Malmquist CO2 performance index (NMMCPI) with three decomposition indices: efficiency change index, best practice gap index, and technological gap change index. Our empirical results indicate that domestic firms have performed well in terms of better catch-up and innovation performance. On the other hand, FDI firms only demonstrated higher technology leadership performance, indicating weaker catch-up performance and weaker innovation performance. From the results, we proposed that policymakers should harmonize between the FDI promotion and regulation in its sustainable performance because global companies are not sensitive to the local regulations, and not very proactive in implementing the global standard of eco-friendliness. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Energy Transition and Climate Change in Decision-making Processes)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Measurement of Fairness Perceptions in Energy Transition Research: A Factorial Survey Approach
Sustainability 2020, 12(19), 8084; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12198084 - 30 Sep 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 962
Abstract
Justice and fairness are increasingly popular concepts in energy research and comprise several justice dimensions, including distributive and procedural justice, related to energy production and consumption. In this paper, we used factorial survey experiments—a method employed in sociological justice research—for energy transition research. [...] Read more.
Justice and fairness are increasingly popular concepts in energy research and comprise several justice dimensions, including distributive and procedural justice, related to energy production and consumption. In this paper, we used factorial survey experiments—a method employed in sociological justice research—for energy transition research. In a factorial survey, respondents evaluated one or more situations described by several attributes, which varied in their levels. The experimental setup of factorial surveys is one of its advantages over simple survey items, as based on this, the relative importance of each attribute for justice evaluations can be determined. We employed the method in a study on the perceived fairness of renewable energy expansion projects related to wind energy, solar energy, and biomass in Germany, and considered aspects of procedural and distributive justice. We show that the effects of these justice dimensions can be separated and the heterogeneity in justice evaluations can be explained. Compared to previous studies applying factorial survey experiments to explain the acceptance of renewable energy projects, we employed the method to directly measure justice concerns and asked respondents to evaluate the vignettes in terms of perceived fairness. This is important because acceptance and fairness as well as inequality and injustice are different phenomena. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Energy Transition and Climate Change in Decision-making Processes)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Communication
Climate Change, Agriculture, and Energy Transition: What Do the Thirty Most-Cited Articles Tell Us?
Sustainability 2020, 12(19), 8015; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12198015 - 28 Sep 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1191
Abstract
The thirty journal articles dealing with the relationship between climate change and agriculture (the latter is treated in general, i.e., as an industry) and which have gained >1000 citations are thought to be sources of the most precious information on the noted relationship. [...] Read more.
The thirty journal articles dealing with the relationship between climate change and agriculture (the latter is treated in general, i.e., as an industry) and which have gained >1000 citations are thought to be sources of the most precious information on the noted relationship. They were published between 1994 and 2011. Many are authored by West European and North American experts. The most-cited articles are attributed to three major themes and eight particular topics, and the best-explored topic is the influence of climate change on agriculture. Moreover, they provide some essential information about the strong relation of both agriculture and climate change to energy transition. The general frame characterizing complex interactions of climate change and agriculture development is proposed on the basis of the most-cited works, but it needs further detail, improvement, and update. The considered articles are basic sources with historical importance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Energy Transition and Climate Change in Decision-making Processes)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
The Citizens’ Views on Adaptation to Bioclimatic Housing Design: Case Study from Greece
Sustainability 2020, 12(12), 4984; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12124984 - 18 Jun 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1034
Abstract
Bioclimatic housing design is regarded as an important pillar towards energy policies. Additionally, it is closely affiliated with the performance of energy efficiency of buildings. The citizens’ views and their adaptation to energy saving practices can be utilized as an important data base [...] Read more.
Bioclimatic housing design is regarded as an important pillar towards energy policies. Additionally, it is closely affiliated with the performance of energy efficiency of buildings. The citizens’ views and their adaptation to energy saving practices can be utilized as an important data base in order to design, improve and properly manage urbanization and environmental challenges in the residential sector. For the capitalization of the citizens’ views in Orestiada, the newest city in Greece, simple random sampling was applied on data that were collected via personal interviews and with the use of a structured questionnaire. Reliability and factor analyses were applied for the data processing along with hierarchical log-linear analysis. The latter was utilized for the statistical clustering of citizens into given distinct groups—clusters, arising by factor analysis. The main findings revealed that the citizens are merely aware of bioclimatic principles, while only a small percentage of 28.8% adopts some primary bioclimatic disciplines. Conclusively, it should be noted that there is a need for effective planning towards empowerment on energy efficiency in the residential sector of the city. Notwithstanding, it should not be disregarded the need for the incorporation of conceptual frameworks in urban planning. This is an approach that prerequisites public awareness and the stakeholders’ participation in decision making processes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Energy Transition and Climate Change in Decision-making Processes)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
A Multicriteria Approach for Assessing the Impact of ICT on EU Sustainable Regional Policy
Sustainability 2020, 12(12), 4869; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12124869 - 15 Jun 2020
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1234
Abstract
As a global actor, the European Union (EU) plays a leading role in international efforts to promote sustainable development globally. All sustainable objectives and targets need Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) as key catalysts, since ICTs constitute tools of unprecedented power which help [...] Read more.
As a global actor, the European Union (EU) plays a leading role in international efforts to promote sustainable development globally. All sustainable objectives and targets need Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) as key catalysts, since ICTs constitute tools of unprecedented power which help people to face the growing challenges of rising population, poverty, epidemics and climate change. Policy makers in the EU are increasingly putting ICTs into relations with sustainable regional development. This paper aims to study and assess the impact of ICT on the EU regional policy in terms of sustainable development by applying the multicriteria approach, PROMETHEE II, using the software Visual PROMETHEE. The criteria that were used in this research are the criteria that both the European Commission and member states define to assess the ICT implications of new EU legislation since 2010. The results revealed that the impact of ICT on EU sustainable regional policy has gotten stronger in the last two decades. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Energy Transition and Climate Change in Decision-making Processes)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Editorial, Research

Review
Social Acceptance of Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) from Industrial Applications
Sustainability 2021, 13(21), 12278; https://doi.org/10.3390/su132112278 - 07 Nov 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 803
Abstract
To limit global warming, the use of carbon capture and storage technologies (CCS) is considered to be of major importance. In addition to the technical–economic, ecological and political aspects, the question of social acceptance is a decisive factor for the implementation of such [...] Read more.
To limit global warming, the use of carbon capture and storage technologies (CCS) is considered to be of major importance. In addition to the technical–economic, ecological and political aspects, the question of social acceptance is a decisive factor for the implementation of such low-carbon technologies. This study is the first literature review addressing the acceptance of industrial CCS (iCCS). In contrast to electricity generation, the technical options for large-scale reduction of CO2 emissions in the energy-intensive industry sector are not sufficient to achieve the targeted GHG neutrality in the industrial sector without the use of CCS. Therefore, it will be crucial to determine which factors influence the acceptance of iCCS and how these findings can be used for policy and industry decision-making processes. The results show that there has been limited research on the acceptance of iCCS. In addition, the study highlights some important differences between the acceptance of iCCS and CCS. Due to the technical diversity of future iCCS applications, future acceptance research must be able to better address the complexity of the research subject. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Energy Transition and Climate Change in Decision-making Processes)
Review
Heat-Mitigation Strategies to Improve Pedestrian Thermal Comfort in Urban Environments: A Review
Sustainability 2020, 12(23), 10000; https://doi.org/10.3390/su122310000 - 30 Nov 2020
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 1319
Abstract
Thermal comfort is one of the main factors affecting pedestrian health, and improving thermal comfort enhances walkability. In this paper, the impact of various strategies on thermal-comfort improvement for pedestrians is thoroughly evaluated and compared. Review studies cover both fieldwork and simulation results. [...] Read more.
Thermal comfort is one of the main factors affecting pedestrian health, and improving thermal comfort enhances walkability. In this paper, the impact of various strategies on thermal-comfort improvement for pedestrians is thoroughly evaluated and compared. Review studies cover both fieldwork and simulation results. These strategies consist of shading (trees, buildings), the orientation and geometry of urban forms, vegetation, solar-reflective materials, and water bodies, which were investigated as the most effective ways to improve outdoor thermal comfort. Results showed that the most important climatic factors affecting outdoor thermal comfort are mean radiant temperature, wind speed, and wind direction in a microclimate. The best heat-mitigation strategy for improving thermal comfort was found to be vegetation and specifically trees because of their shading effect. The effect of height-to-width (H/W) ratio in canyons is another important factor. By increasing H/W ratio, the thermal-comfort level also increases. Deploying highly reflective materials in urban canyons is not recommended, as several studies showed that they could reflect solar radiation onto pedestrians. Results also showed that, in order to achieve a satisfactory level of thermal comfort, physiological and psychological factors should be considered together. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Energy Transition and Climate Change in Decision-making Processes)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop