sensors-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Methodology Applications for Sensors-Based Electronic Performance and Tracking Systems in Sport

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Physical Sensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2022) | Viewed by 9035

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
1 Department of Physical Activity and Sport, Faculty of Sport Science, University of Murcia, 30720 Murcia, Spain
2 Faculty of Sports Sciences, BioVetMed & SportSci Research Group, University of Murcia, 30100 Murcia, Spain
Interests: electronic performance and tracking systems; technology; local positioning systems; global positioning systems; team sports performance
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Society, Sports and Physical Exercise Research Group (GIKAFIT). Department of Physical Education and Sport, Faculty of Education and Sport, University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU), Vitoria-Gasteiz, Spain
Interests: team sports; sport pedagogy; tactical behavior; electronic performance and tracking systems
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Polytechnic Institute of Viana do Castelo, School of Sport and Leisure, 4960-320 Melgaço, Portugal
Interests: football; soccer; match analysis; performance analysis; network analysis
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The low amount of information reported in articles´ methodology about the use of electronic performance and tracking systems (EPTS) in sport has been highlighted before. A survey published in Sensors asked what criteria should be considered using these systems. This Special Issue on “Methodology Applications for Sensors-based Electronic Performance and Tracking Systems (EPTS) in Sport” aims to go into detail about the criteria suggested in the survey. Specifically, the aim is to assess the impact of the modifications in each criterion in the measurement, recording, and processing of the data. In this way, we can evaluate the accuracy of the measure according to the used methodology using sensor-based EPTS. This issue may drive a change within sport and the use of EPTS.

Considering that more research should be done and published about such important topics, the aim of this Special Issue is to publish high-quality original investigations and narrative and systematic reviews in the field. We look forward to receiving contributions related (but not limited) to the following topics:

  • Electronic performance and tracking systems (EPTS);
  • Sports analytics;
  • Data recording;
  • Data processing.

Dr. José Pino-Ortega
Dr. Markel Rico-González
Dr. Asier Los Arcos
Dr. Filipe Manuel Clemente
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Global positioning systems
  • Local positioning systems
  • Semi-automatic camera systems
  • Microelectromechanical systems
  • Validity and reliability
  • Methodology applications

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Other

8 pages, 261 KiB  
Article
Different Sampling Frequencies to Calculate Collective Tactical Variables during Competition: A Case of an Official Female’s Soccer Match
by Ibai Errekagorri, Julen Castellano, Asier Los Arcos, Markel Rico-González and José Pino-Ortega
Sensors 2022, 22(12), 4508; https://doi.org/10.3390/s22124508 - 14 Jun 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1633
Abstract
The objective of the study was to assess the impact of the sampling frequency on the outcomes of collective tactical variables during an official women’s soccer match. To do this, the first half (lasting 46 min) of an official league match of a [...] Read more.
The objective of the study was to assess the impact of the sampling frequency on the outcomes of collective tactical variables during an official women’s soccer match. To do this, the first half (lasting 46 min) of an official league match of a semi-professional soccer team belonging to the Women’s Second Division of Spain (Reto Iberdrola) was analysed. The collective variables recorded were classified into three main groups: point-related variable (i.e., change in geometrical centre position (cGCp)), distance-related variables (i.e., width, length, height, distance from the goalkeeper to the near defender and mean distance between players), and area-related variables (i.e., surface area). Each variable was measured using eight different sampling frequencies: data every 100 (10 Hz), 200 (5 Hz), 250 (4 Hz), 400 (2.5 Hz), 500 (2 Hz), 1000 (1 Hz), 2000 (0.5 Hz), and 4000 ms (0.25 Hz). With the exception of cGCp, the outcomes of the collective tactical variables did not vary depending on the sampling frequency used (p > 0.05; Effect Size < 0.001). The results suggest that a sampling frequency of 0.5 Hz would be sufficient to measure the collective tactical variables that assess distance and area during an official soccer match. Full article
16 pages, 6359 KiB  
Article
The Influence of Antenna Height on the Measurement of Collective Variables Using an Ultra-Wide Band Based Local Positioning System in Team Sports
by José Pino-Ortega, Asier Los Arcos, Petrus Gantois, Filipe Manuel Clemente, Fabio Yuzo Nakamura and Markel Rico-González
Sensors 2021, 21(7), 2424; https://doi.org/10.3390/s21072424 - 1 Apr 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2345
Abstract
Ultra-wide band (UWB) based local positioning systems (LPS) are based on devices and a portable antenna set. The optimal installation height of the antennae is crucial to ensure data accuracy. Collective variables are metrics that consider at least two pairs of coordinates, which [...] Read more.
Ultra-wide band (UWB) based local positioning systems (LPS) are based on devices and a portable antenna set. The optimal installation height of the antennae is crucial to ensure data accuracy. Collective variables are metrics that consider at least two pairs of coordinates, which may lead to lower precision than an individual one. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare the influence of antenna height with collective metrics using a UWB (i.e., IMU; WIMU PRO™, RealTrack Systems, Almeria, Spain) based LPS. Data acquisition was carried out in a basketball court measuring 28 × 15 m. Five devices were used; one of which was carried by a healthy and well-trained athlete (age: 38 years, mass: 76.34 kg, height 1.70 m), while each of the remaining four was positioned on a tripod in one of the four corners of the court. Four kinds of variables were extracted: (1) static distances, (2) dynamic distances, (3) static areas and (4) dynamic areas in all antenna installation modes of 0.15, 1.30 and 2.00 m. The results showed that the antenna of 1.30 m provided better accuracy for all measures (% difference range from −0.94 to 1.17%) followed by the antenna of 2.00 m (% difference range from −2.50 to 2.15%), with the antenna of 0.15 m providing the worst accuracy level (% difference range from −1.05 to 3.28%). Overall, the measurements of distance metrics showed greater accuracy than area metrics (distance % difference range from −0.85 to 2.81% and area % difference range from −2.50 to 3.28). In conclusion, the height of the antennae in basketball courts should be similar to the height at which the devices are attached to a player’s upper back. However, as the precision is sensitive to the magnitude of the measure, further studies should assess the effects of the relative height of antennae in team sports with greater playing spaces. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Other

Jump to: Research

14 pages, 16081 KiB  
Letter
A Pedestrian Dead Reckoning Method for Head-Mounted Sensors
by Xinyu Hou and Jeroen Bergmann
Sensors 2020, 20(21), 6349; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20216349 - 7 Nov 2020
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 3668
Abstract
Pedestrian dead reckoning (PDR) plays an important role in modern life, including localisation and navigation if a Global Positioning System (GPS) is not available. Most previous PDR methods adopted foot-mounted sensors. However, humans have evolved to keep the head steady in space when [...] Read more.
Pedestrian dead reckoning (PDR) plays an important role in modern life, including localisation and navigation if a Global Positioning System (GPS) is not available. Most previous PDR methods adopted foot-mounted sensors. However, humans have evolved to keep the head steady in space when the body is moving in order to stabilise the visual field. This indicates that sensors that are placed on the head might provide a more suitable alternative for real-world tracking. Emerging wearable technologies that are connected to the head also makes this a growing field of interest. Head-mounted equipment, such as glasses, are already ubiquitous in everyday life. Whilst other wearable gear, such as helmets, masks, or mouthguards, are becoming increasingly more common. Thus, an accurate PDR method that is specifically designed for head-mounted sensors is needed. It could have various applications in sports, emergency rescue, smart home, etc. In this paper, a new PDR method is introduced for head mounted sensors and compared to two established methods. The data were collected by sensors that were placed on glasses and embedded into a mouthguard. The results show that the newly proposed method outperforms the other two techniques in terms of accuracy, with the new method producing an average end-to-end error of 0.88 m and total distance error of 2.10%. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop