Special Issue "Training Process in Soccer Players"

A special issue of Sports (ISSN 2075-4663).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2019.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Filipe Manuel Clemente
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Polytechnic Institute of Viana do Castelo, School of Sport and Leisure (Melgaço, Portugal)
Tel. +351 258 809 678
Interests: soccer; association football; sports training; training monitoring; performance analysis; small-sided games
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Hugo Sarmento
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Sport Sciences and Physical Education, University of Coimbra, Portugal
Interests: soccer; association football; sports training; match analysis; football and medicine
Prof. Israel Teoldo Costa
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Universidade Federal de Viçosa – Campus Viçosa, Departamento de Educação Física, Núcleo de Pesquisa e Estudos em Futebol (NUPEF), Brazil
Interests: soccer; association football; teaching and learning; match analysis; team sports; small-sided and conditioned games
Prof. Sixto González-Víllora
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
University of Castilla-La Mancha, Faculty of Education (Cuenca), Spain
Tel. (+ 34) 969 179 196
Interests: soccer; association football; teaching and learning; match analysis; team sports; small-sided and conditioned games
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue ‘Training Process in Soccer Players’ is a new venue to publish original research, meta-analyses, reviews, case studies, short communications and book reviews related to soccer-training topics. This Special Issue aims to publish research on various aspects of soccer training, including: (i) small-sided games; (ii) high intensity interval training on soccer players; (iii) training monitoring and testing; (iv) periodization; (v) physiology of soccer; and (vi) coaching in soccer. Any other topics are welcome to this Special Issue, especially articles that bring new theoretical and practical approaches to the soccer field.

Prof. Filipe Manuel Clemente
Prof. Hugo Sarmento
Prof. Israel Teoldo Costa
Prof. Sixto González-Víllora
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sports is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Association Football
  • Soccer
  • Sports training
  • Small-sided games
  • High intensity interval training
  • Periodization
  • Training monitoring and testing
  • Pedagogy and teaching

Published Papers (13 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
The Importance of Fundamental Motor Skills in Identifying Differences in Performance Levels of U10 Soccer Players
Sports 2019, 7(7), 178; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports7070178 - 22 Jul 2019
Abstract
This study examined the differences in fundamental motor skills (FMSs) and specific conditioning capacities (SCCs) between a coach’s classification of first team (FT) and second team (ST) U10 soccer players and examined the most important qualities based on how the coach differentiates them. [...] Read more.
This study examined the differences in fundamental motor skills (FMSs) and specific conditioning capacities (SCCs) between a coach’s classification of first team (FT) and second team (ST) U10 soccer players and examined the most important qualities based on how the coach differentiates them. The FT (n = 12; Mage = 9.72 ± 0.41) and ST (n = 11; Mage = 9.57 ± 0.41) soccer players were assessed using the Test of Gross Motor Development-2, standing long jump, sit and reach, diverse sprints, and the 20 m multistage fitness test (MSFT). The coach’s subjective evaluation of players was obtained using a questionnaire. No significant differences existed between the FT and ST in any variables (p > 0.05). However, large and moderate effect sizes were present in favour of the FT group in locomotor skills (d = 0.82 (0.08, 1.51)), gross motor quotient (d = 0.73 (0.00, 1.41)), height (d = 0.61 (−0.12, 1.29)), MSFT (d = 0.58 (−0.14, 1.25)), and maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max) (d = 0.55 (−0.17, 1.22)). Furthermore, the coach perceived the FT group as having greater technical and tactical qualities relative to ST players. This suggests that it might be more relevant for players of this age to develop good FMS connected to technical skills, before focusing on SCC. Therefore, it might be beneficial for soccer coaches to emphasize the development of FMSs due to their potential to identify talented young soccer players and because they underpin the technical soccer skills that are required for future soccer success. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Training Process in Soccer Players)
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Open AccessArticle
An Approach to the Fatigue in Young Soccer Players Resulting from Sided Games
Sports 2019, 7(7), 174; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports7070174 - 18 Jul 2019
Abstract
It is crucial to understand the fatigue associated with sided games (SGs) of soccer in the training context, in order to establish the appropriate intervals between training sessions. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of different SGs on [...] Read more.
It is crucial to understand the fatigue associated with sided games (SGs) of soccer in the training context, in order to establish the appropriate intervals between training sessions. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of different SGs on internal load, measured by the session rating of perceived exertion (sRPE), and on sprint performance. Ten outfield players (age: 14.5 ± 0.5 years, height: 169 ± 6 cm, body mass: 59.7 ± 6.4 kg) belonging to U15 age category participated in this study. The participants played four SG formats with modifications in the pitch size and in the bout duration, but with the same total duration for the SGs (SG1, SG2, SG3, and SG4). All the players performed a 10 and a 30 m sprint test before and after the SGs. The internal load was measured by the sRPE. The results showed no significant differences (p > 0.05) in the sRPE registered by the soccer players for the different SGs, but worse sprint performances over the 10 m (p < 0.05; ES: 0.74–1.38, large) and 30 m (p < 0.05; ES: 0.70–2.10, moderate to large) distances after completion of the SGs, except the 10 m sprint after SG2 and SG3 (p > 0.05; ES: 0.43–0.55, moderate). In addition, no correlation (p > 0.05) was reported between the sprint performances for the 10 and 30 m distances and the sRPE registered during the SGs. These results could be useful for technical staff wishing to design the playing area and bout duration of their training tasks effectively. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Training Process in Soccer Players)
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Open AccessArticle
Shorter Small-Sided Game Sets May Increase the Intensity of Internal and External Load Measures: A Study in Amateur Soccer Players
Sports 2019, 7(5), 107; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports7050107 - 09 May 2019
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to compare internal and external load measures during two regimens (6 x 3’ and 3 x 6’) of a 5 vs. 5 format of play. Moreover, within-regimen changes (between sets) were also tested. Ten amateur soccer players [...] Read more.
The purpose of this study was to compare internal and external load measures during two regimens (6 x 3’ and 3 x 6’) of a 5 vs. 5 format of play. Moreover, within-regimen changes (between sets) were also tested. Ten amateur soccer players (age: 19.8 ± 1.6 years; experience: 8.3 ± 2.1 years; height: 177.4 ± 3.8 cm; weight: 71.7 ± 4.2 kg) participated in the experiment. Internal load was measured using the CR-10 scale as the rated of perceived exertion (RPE) scale and a heart rate (HR) monitor. The measurements of total (TD), running (RD) and sprinting (SD) distances were also collected using a 10-Hz validated and reliable GPS. Comparisons between regimens revealed that the 3 x 6’ regimen was significantly more intense in terms of RPE than the 6 x 3’ regimen (p = 0.028; d = 0.351), although no significant differences were found in HR. Significantly greater averages of TD (p = 0.000; d = 0.871) and RD (p = 0.004; d = 0.491) were found in the 6 x 3’ regimen. In both regimens, the RPE was significantly lower during the first set than in the remaining sets. On the other hand, the TD was significantly shorter in the last sets than in the earlier. In summary, the present study suggests that shorter sets may be beneficial for maintaining higher internal and external load intensities during 5 vs. 5 formats, and that a drop-in performance may occur throughout the sets in both regimens. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Training Process in Soccer Players)
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Open AccessArticle
Short-Term Cardiac Autonomic Recovery after a Repeated Sprint Test in Young Soccer Players
Sports 2019, 7(5), 102; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports7050102 - 30 Apr 2019
Abstract
The aim of this study was to describe the time course (within 2 h post-exercise) of heart rate variability (HRV) recovery following a traditional repeated sprint ability (RSA) test applied to youth soccer players. Twenty-four young soccer players (18.4 ± 0.5 years) undertook [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to describe the time course (within 2 h post-exercise) of heart rate variability (HRV) recovery following a traditional repeated sprint ability (RSA) test applied to youth soccer players. Twenty-four young soccer players (18.4 ± 0.5 years) undertook the following assessments: (1) 10 min rest in the seated position for HRV assessment; (2) a repeated sprint ability (RSA) test; (3) passive recovery in the seated position for 10 min, immediately after finishing the RSA test and 1 h and 2 h post-RSA test. During the HRV measurements (using the natural log of root mean square difference of successive normal RR intervals—lnRMSSD) the participants were instructed to assume a comfortable sitting position, remaining awake and breathing spontaneously for 10 min. Magnitude-based inference was used in the analyses. After the RSA test, the post-1 h measure was almost certainly lower than the resting measure, but almost certainly higher than the lnRMSSD measured post-RSA test. The lnRMSSD post-2 h was likely lower than the resting lnRMSSD and very likely higher than post-1 h. In conclusion, lnRMSSD is severely depressed after performing an RSA test, and reactivation is incomplete after 2 h of passive recovery. This result should be considered by practitioners when applying successive training sessions within intervals shorter than 2 h. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Training Process in Soccer Players)
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Open AccessArticle
Working Memory Training in Professional Football Players: A Small-Scale Descriptive Feasibility Study—The Importance of Personality, Psychological Well-Being, and Motivational Factors
Sports 2019, 7(4), 89; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports7040089 - 18 Apr 2019
Abstract
Background: Working memory training (WMT) programs can improve working memory (WM). In football players, this could lead to improved performance on the pitch. Method: Eighteen professional football players of Maatschappelijke Voetbal Vereniging Maastricht (MVV) participated and followed an online, computerized WMT program. Neuropsychological [...] Read more.
Background: Working memory training (WMT) programs can improve working memory (WM). In football players, this could lead to improved performance on the pitch. Method: Eighteen professional football players of Maatschappelijke Voetbal Vereniging Maastricht (MVV) participated and followed an online, computerized WMT program. Neuropsychological performance, psychological wellbeing, self-efficacy, and football skills (Loughborough Soccer Passing Test; LSPT) were assessed at three time points, before and after WMT and at three-month follow-up. Descriptive data are reported. Results: Baseline characteristics were roughly similar for both groups. Participants performed better on the trained WM tasks, but performance for other neuropsychological test measures or the LSPT did not change. Low compliance rates were observed, showing differences in personality and well-being between compliers and non-compliers. Conclusions: WMT is not a feasible and effective strategy to improve non-trained cognitive measures and football performance. However, this study indicates that it is important to take individual characteristics into account. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Training Process in Soccer Players)
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Open AccessArticle
Effects of 7-Week Hip Thrust Versus Back Squat Resistance Training on Performance in Adolescent Female Soccer Players
Sports 2019, 7(4), 80; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports7040080 - 03 Apr 2019
Abstract
Hip thrust (HT) is a loaded bridging exercise that requires more hip extension than a back squat (SQ) does, while in a back squat, triple flex extension occurs. Due to the specificity of each exercise, it is claimed that HT gains can be [...] Read more.
Hip thrust (HT) is a loaded bridging exercise that requires more hip extension than a back squat (SQ) does, while in a back squat, triple flex extension occurs. Due to the specificity of each exercise, it is claimed that HT gains can be better transferred to actions where hip extension occurs. In addition, strength improvements during squatting can be transferred in a greater way to vertical plane movement, such as vertical jumping. However, its effects on the performance of female soccer players are unclear. For this reason, the purpose of this study was to analyze a 7-week training program on performance variables using either HT or SQ exercises in female adolescent soccer players without lifting experience (N = 24, age = 16.82 ± 1.56 years, height = 1.64 ± 0.55 cm, body mass = 58.35 ± 6.28 kg). Players were randomized into three groups: A back squat group (SQG; N = 8), hip thrust group (HTG; N = 8), and control group (CG; N = 8). Participants in the HTG and SQG joined a progressive resistance training program twice per week for 7 weeks with either HT or SQ exercises. A countermovement jump, 10–20 m sprint, T-test, and barbell velocity during HTs and SQs (with the load that represents ~60 and ~80% RM) were measured before and after the intervention. The HTG showed greater improvements in the 10-m sprint (d = 0.7), 20-m sprint (d = 0.46), T-test (d = 0.36), and barbell velocity at 80% repetition maximal (RM) (d = 0.53) and 60% RM (d = 1.02) during hip thrusts, while the SQG showed higher barbell velocity at 80% RM (d = −0.7) during back squats. These results may be useful for strength and conditioning coaches working with adolescent female soccer athletes, since both strengthening exercises improved performance in different ways due to the nature of the exercise. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Training Process in Soccer Players)
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Open AccessArticle
Comparative Study of Two Intervention Programmes for Teaching Soccer to School-Age Students
Sports 2019, 7(3), 74; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports7030074 - 26 Mar 2019
Abstract
The objective of this study was to design and analyse the differences and/or similarities of two homogeneous intervention programmes (didactic units) based on two different teaching methods, Direct Instruction (DI) and Tactical Games Approach (TGA), for teaching school-age soccer. The sample was composed [...] Read more.
The objective of this study was to design and analyse the differences and/or similarities of two homogeneous intervention programmes (didactic units) based on two different teaching methods, Direct Instruction (DI) and Tactical Games Approach (TGA), for teaching school-age soccer. The sample was composed of 58 tasks, 29 for each intervention programme. The pedagogical and external Training Load (eTL) variables recorded in the Integral System for Training Tasks Analysis (SIATE) were studied. The two intervention programmes were compared using Chi-Square, Mann-Whitney U and the Adjusted Standardized Residuals statistical tests. Likewise, the strength of association of the variables under study was calculated using Cramer’s Phi and Cramer’s V coefficients. Both intervention programmes had the same number of tasks (n = 29), sessions (n = 12), game phases (x2 = 0.000; p = 1.000), specific contents (x2 = 5.311; p = 0.968) and didactic objectives, as well as different levels of eTL (U = 145.000; p = 0.000; d = 1.357); which are necessary requirements to be considered similar. The differences and/or similarities between both intervention programmes will offer teachers guidelines to develop different didactic units using the specific DI and TGA methodologies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Training Process in Soccer Players)
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Open AccessArticle
Influence of Aerobic Power on Youth Players’ Tactical Behavior and Network Properties during Football Small-Sided Games
Sports 2019, 7(3), 73; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports7030073 - 25 Mar 2019
Abstract
(1) Background: This study aimed to compare the incidence of tactical principles, the percentage of successful tactical principles, and the network properties between higher and lower aerobic power in young football players during small-sided games. (2) Methods: Eighteen Under-17 Brazilian players were recruited. [...] Read more.
(1) Background: This study aimed to compare the incidence of tactical principles, the percentage of successful tactical principles, and the network properties between higher and lower aerobic power in young football players during small-sided games. (2) Methods: Eighteen Under-17 Brazilian players were recruited. Firstly, they performed the Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Test Level 2, which was used to split them into two groups with higher and lower aerobic power. In the sequence, they played three vs three small-sided games within each group. The System of Tactical Assessment in Soccer was used to analyze the tactical behavior demonstrated by measuring the incidence of tactical principles and the percentage of successful principles, while the macro variables, density and clustering coefficient from social network analysis for team sports was used to analyze players’ interactions. (3) Results: No differences were reported for the incidence of tactical principles (p > 0.05, small or small-to-moderate effect sizes), the percentage of successful offensive principles (p = 0.122, small-to-moderate effect size), or the network variables (p > 0.05; small effect sizes). The lower aerobic power group demonstrated a higher percentage of successful defensive tactical principles (p = 0.043; small-to-moderate effect size). (4) Conclusions: We concluded that aerobic power has a limited impact on player behavior, indicating that players’ actions within a small-sided game are mostly constrained by other parameters. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Monitoring Training and Match Physical Load in Junior Soccer Players: Starters versus Substitutes
Sports 2019, 7(3), 70; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports7030070 - 19 Mar 2019
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate differences in the physical (locomotor activities) and physiological (Banister’s training impulse) in-season training load between starters and substitutes in a well-trained junior soccer team. Physical performance variables from the Polar Team Pro system were collected [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to investigate differences in the physical (locomotor activities) and physiological (Banister’s training impulse) in-season training load between starters and substitutes in a well-trained junior soccer team. Physical performance variables from the Polar Team Pro system were collected and analyzed from a sample of junior soccer players (N = 18; age = 15.7 ± 0.5 years; stature, 177.9 ± 4.6 cm; body mass, 67.1 ± 5.5 kg). The study analyzed a total of 10 matches and 38 training sessions during the 2018 season with linear mixed models. The players from the starting line-ups demonstrated significantly higher average weekly physical load compared to the non-starters with respect to all variables: distance (total, running, high-speed running, and sprint) [F (1, 573) ≥ 66, p < 0.001, eta = 0.10], number of accelerations and sprints [F (1, 573) ≥ 66, p < 0.001, eta = 0.10], as well as Banister’s training impulse (TRIMP) [F (1, 569) = 10, p < 0.001, eta = 0.02]. Evidence from this study indicates that a large amount of weekly accumulated high-speed running and sprint distances is related to match playing time. Therefore, weekly fitness-related adaptations in running at high speeds seem to favor the starters in a soccer team. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Training Process in Soccer Players)
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Open AccessArticle
Relationship between External Load and Perceptual Responses to Training in Professional Football: Effects of Quantification Method
Sports 2019, 7(3), 68; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports7030068 - 17 Mar 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
We examined the within-player correlation between external training load (ETL) and perceptual responses to training in a professional male football team (n = 13 outfield players) over an eight-week competitive period. ETL was collected using 10-Hz GPS, whereas perceptual responses were accessed [...] Read more.
We examined the within-player correlation between external training load (ETL) and perceptual responses to training in a professional male football team (n = 13 outfield players) over an eight-week competitive period. ETL was collected using 10-Hz GPS, whereas perceptual responses were accessed through rating of perceived exertion (RPE) questionnaires. Moderate-speed running (MSR), high-speed running (HSR) and sprinting were defined using arbitrary (fixed) and individualised speed zones (based on maximal aerobic speed and maximal sprinting speed). When ETL was expressed as actual distance covered within the training session, perceptual responses were moderately correlated to MSR and HSR quantified using the arbitrary method (p < 0.05; r = 0.53 to 0.59). However, the magnitude of correlations tended to increase when the individualised method was used (p < 0.05; r = 0.58 to 0.67). Distance covered by sprinting was moderately correlated to perceptual responses only when the individualised method was used (p < 0.05; 0.55 [0.05; 0.83] and 0.53 [0.02; 0.82]). Perceptual responses were largely correlated to the sum of distance covered within all three speed running zones, irrespective of the quantification method (p < 0.05; r = 0.58 to 0.68). When ETL was expressed as percentage of total distance covered within the training session, no significant correlations were observed (p > 0.05). Perceptual responses to training load seem to be better associated with ETL, when the latter is adjusted to individual fitness capacities. Moreover, reporting ETL as actual values of distance covered within the training session instead of percentual values inform better about players’ perceptual responses to training load. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Training Process in Soccer Players)
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Open AccessArticle
Physical Fitness Characteristics of High-level Youth Football Players: Influence of Playing Position
Sports 2019, 7(2), 46; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports7020046 - 16 Feb 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
The aim of this study was to determine whether the speed, agility, aerobic and anaerobic capacities of football players varied by playing positions. Elite youth football players (n = 123, age = 15.7 ± 0.5 years) who played in six different positions, [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to determine whether the speed, agility, aerobic and anaerobic capacities of football players varied by playing positions. Elite youth football players (n = 123, age = 15.7 ± 0.5 years) who played in six different positions, as goalkeepers (GK), full backs (FB), central defenders (CD), wide midfielders (WM), central midfielders (CM), and attackers (AT), were assessed. Multivariate analysis of variances was used to compare the following variables: Linear running sprint for 5 m (S5) and 10 m (S10), flying sprint for 20 m (F20), agility 505 test with turn on the dominant (A505D) and non-dominant leg (A505N), agility K-test, Yo-Yo intermittent recovery (YYIR1) test and repeat sprint ability (RSA) test. The results showed significant influence of playing positions on linear-running sprint performance (F1,123 = 6.19, p < 0.01, ηp2 = 0.23). Midfielders reached significantly higher performance levels (CM = 2.44 ± 0.08 s, WM = 2.47 ± 0.13 s) in the A505N test compared to GK (2.61 ± 0.23 s). Outfield players had significantly higher performance in both YYIR1 and RSA tests compared to GK (p < 0.01). The results of this study may provide insightful strategies for coaches and clinical practitioners for developing position-specific conditioning programs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Training Process in Soccer Players)
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Open AccessArticle
Comparative Analysis of Load Profile between Small-Sided Games and Official Matches in Youth Soccer Players
Sports 2018, 6(4), 173; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports6040173 - 12 Dec 2018
Cited by 4
Abstract
The purposes of the present study are: (a) to characterize the external (eTL) and internal load (iTL) of official matches and small-sided games (SSGs) in relation to their objective, (b) to compare demands between SSG, and (c) to analyze the SSG requirements in [...] Read more.
The purposes of the present study are: (a) to characterize the external (eTL) and internal load (iTL) of official matches and small-sided games (SSGs) in relation to their objective, (b) to compare demands between SSG, and (c) to analyze the SSG requirements in relation to official matches during a one-month competition period. Twenty under-18 national-level soccer players were recorded using WIMUTM inertial devices (RealTrack Systems, Almeria, Spain) during four official matches and 12 training sessions where four SSGs with different objectives were performed: (SSG1) keeping the ball; (SSG2) keeping the ball and progressing; (SSG3) keeping the ball, progressing and ending in mini-goals; and (SSG4) keeping the ball, progressing and ending in an official goal with a goalkeeper. Statistical analysis included Kruskall-Wallis’ H and Mann-Whitney’s U with Cohen’s d effect size. The SSGs presented walking and jogging intensity movements (0.7–7 to 7–14 km/h), with a 5-to-8 %HIA (high intensity activity, >16 km/h), where low intensity accelerations, decelerations and impacts were predominant (1–2.5 m/s2; 5–7 G), and %HRMAX (maximum heart rate percentage) was between 70–90%. Only SSG4 presented similar demands to competition, finding differences between SSGs (p < 0.05; d = 1.40 − 0.36). In conclusion, the objective of the SSGs directly influenced the demands on the players in training sessions. For this reason, it is important to monitor demands for designing specific training sessions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Training Process in Soccer Players)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Movement Economy in Soccer: Current Data and Limitations
Sports 2018, 6(4), 124; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports6040124 - 23 Oct 2018
Abstract
Soccer is an intermittent team-sport, where performance is determined by a myriad of psychological, technical, tactical, and physical factors. Among the physical factors, endurance appears to play a key role into counteracting the fatigue-related reduction in running performance observed during soccer matches. One [...] Read more.
Soccer is an intermittent team-sport, where performance is determined by a myriad of psychological, technical, tactical, and physical factors. Among the physical factors, endurance appears to play a key role into counteracting the fatigue-related reduction in running performance observed during soccer matches. One physiological determinant of endurance is movement economy, which represents the aerobic energy cost to exercise at a given submaximal velocity. While the role of movement economy has been extensively examined in endurance athletes, it has received little attention in soccer players, but may be an important factor, given the prolonged demands of match play. For this reason, the current review discusses the nature, impact, and trainability of movement economy specific to soccer players. A summary of current knowledge and limitations of movement economy in soccer is provided, with an insight into future research directions, to make this important parameter more valuable when assessing and training soccer players’ running performance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Training Process in Soccer Players)
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