Special Issue "Injuries in Sports: Epidemiology, Identification, Prevention, Treatment, and Return to Play"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 December 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Filipe Manuel Clemente
Website
Guest Editor
Polytechnic Institute of Viana do Castelo, School of Sport and Leisure, Melgaço, Portugal
Interests: sport injuries; injury prevention; team sports; training load; strength and conditioning
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Daniel Castillo
Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Health Sciences, Universidad Isabel I, Burgos, Spain
Interests: physical performance; external loads; training-related fatigue; match load monitoring; contextual factors; sports injuries; team sports
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Javier Raya-González
Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Health Sciences, Universidad Isabel I, Burgos, Spain
Interests: sport injuries, injury prevention, team sports; training load; strength and conditioning

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

A growing body of literature demonstrates the importance of assessing and reporting the prevalence of injuries to get important feedback for the better identification of injury mechanisms with the aim of implementing more appropriate preventive protocols or rehabilitation processes. Therefore, epidemiology, identification, treatment, return to play, and prevention are hot topics in sports injuries that should be continuously updated in an attempt to decrease the exposure to injury risk and decrease the time from injury to full recovery. Moreover, peripherical covariables that may contribute to injury occurrence as fitness status, congested schedules, load management, nutrition, sleep, and recovery are also topics that appear related to injury reports. Therefore, our Special Issue seeks submission that adopt multidimensional approaches in helping practitioners and scientists to decrease injury risk, accelerate the identification of injuries, implement better rehabilitation protocols, and employ individualized training protocols for return-to-play and injury prevention. Considering that more research should be done and published about such important topics, the aim of the Special Issue “Injuries in Sports: Epidemiology, Identification, Prevention, Treatment, and Return to Play” is to publish high-quality original investigations, narratives, and systematic reviews in the field of team sport injuries. We look forward to receiving contributions related (but not limited) to the following topics: (i) epidemiology of sports injuries in youth, adult, recreational, and elite athletes; (ii) identification of injury mechanisms; (iii) evidence-based treatments; (iv) return-to-play programs; (v) strength and conditioning programs for injury prevention or return to play; (vi) load management and relationships with injury occurrence and risk; (vii) physical status and its impact on injury; and (viii) recovery dimensions (e.g., sleep, nutrition, supplementation, rest) and their impact on injury. We would welcome papers related to evidence of successful intervention strategies. All manuscripts will be peer-reviewed by experts in the field.

Dr. Filipe Manuel Clemente
Dr. Daniel Castillo
Dr. Javier Raya-González 
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • injury epidemiology
  • injury identification
  • injury treatment
  • return to play
  • injury prevention
  • recovery strategies
  • load management
  • strength and conditioning

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Open AccessArticle
Eccentric-Overload Production during the Flywheel Squat Exercise in Young Soccer Players: Implications for Injury Prevention
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(10), 3671; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17103671 - 22 May 2020
Abstract
This study aimed to evaluate the differences in power production between movement phases (i.e., concentric and eccentric) during the execution of resistance exercises with a flywheel device, differentiating between execution regimes (i.e., bilateral, unilateral dominant leg and unilateral non-dominant leg). Twenty young elite [...] Read more.
This study aimed to evaluate the differences in power production between movement phases (i.e., concentric and eccentric) during the execution of resistance exercises with a flywheel device, differentiating between execution regimes (i.e., bilateral, unilateral dominant leg and unilateral non-dominant leg). Twenty young elite soccer players (U−17) performed two sets of six repetitions of the bilateral half-squat (inertia 0.025 kg·m−2) and the lateral-squat exercise (inertia 0.010 kg·m−2) on a flywheel device. During the testing sessions, mean and peak power in concentric (MPcon) and eccentric (MPecc) phases were recorded. The non-dominant leg showed higher values in all power variables measured, although substantial differences were only found in MPecc (ES = 0.40, likely) and PPcon (ES = 0.36, possibly). On the other hand, for both exercises, MPcon was higher than MPecc (ES = −0.57 to −0.31, possibly/likely greater), while only PPecc was higher than PPcon in the dominant lateral-squat (ES = 0.44, likely). These findings suggest that young soccer players have difficulty in reaching eccentric-overload during flywheel exercises, achieving it only with the dominant leg. Therefore, coaches should propose precise preventive programs based on flywheel devices, attending to the specific characteristics of each limb, as well as managing other variables to elicit eccentric-overload. Full article
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Risk Factors for Upper Limb Injury in Tennis Players: A Systematic Review
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(8), 2744; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17082744 - 16 Apr 2020
Abstract
Studies in tennis injuries have successfully identified the incident rate, the location, and the type of the injury. The majority of the studies have multiple perspectives (epidemiology, biomechanics, performance), however only a few studies were able to identify risk factors or mechanisms that [...] Read more.
Studies in tennis injuries have successfully identified the incident rate, the location, and the type of the injury. The majority of the studies have multiple perspectives (epidemiology, biomechanics, performance), however only a few studies were able to identify risk factors or mechanisms that contribute to tennis injuries. Until now, there has not been a systematic literature review that identifies risk factors for tennis injuries. The objective of this review was to identify and critically appraise the evidence related to risk factors for upper limb injury in tennis players. A systematic review was conducted in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) framework, using a research question developed by the Patient Problem, (or Population) Intervention, Comparison or Control, and Outcome (PICO) methodology. The quality of the studies included was moderate to low, indicating prolonged tennis (exposure to tennis), scapular dyskinesis, muscle fatigue, scapulothoracic properties, shoulder kinetics or kinematics, skill level, and technique as risk factors for upper limb injury in tennis players. In this review, it is evidenced that the majority of tennis injuries are associated with overuse and a chronic time course, however, tennis injuries do not arise from a linear combination of isolated and predictive factors. Therefore, the multifactorial and complex nature of tennis injuries has to be further examined. The necessity of more randomized control trial studies is highly recommended. Full article
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