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Physiological, Morphological, Functional and Psychosocial Aspects of Physical Training for Health and Performance

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Sport and Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2022) | Viewed by 8781

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Physical Education Department, Federal University of Segipe, São Cristóvão 49100-000, SE, Brazil
Interests: environmental and exercise physiology; physiological responses; simulated and real adaptations to training; exercise performance for athletes and para-athletes
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Guest Editor
Department of Sports Sciences, Exercise & Health, University of Trás-os-Montes and Alto Douro, Vila Real, Portugal
Interests: bioenergetics of physical activity; physical fitness and health
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Polytechnic Institute of Viana do Castelo, School of Sport and Leisure, 4960-320 Melgaço, Portugal
Interests: football; soccer; match analysis; performance analysis; network analysis
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Research has pointed out that several factors tend to interfere in the performance, recovery, and health of athletes, from childhood to old age, as well as in para-sport. The relationships between stress, maturation, training load, and recovery tend to impact the performance and health of this population. In this context, environmental interventions tend to improve performance and physiological adaptations. However, this stimulus–performance–adaptations relationship tends to vary in different contexts and environments.

Considering that research in sports sciences is still scarce in this topic, we would like to open a window of opportunity to increase the participation of researchers focused on these populations, aiming to widen our knowledge and implications for practice. Therefore, we are looking for original articles and systematic reviews and meta-analyses covering the following topics (but not exclusively): (i) training interventions in exercise, sports, and Paralympic sports, with a special focus on the variability of responses and dose–response relationships; (ii) monitoring the training load and interactions with well-being, readiness, and risk of injury in exercise, sports, and Paralympic sports; (iii) performance analysis and implications for sports training; (iv) recovery processes and interactions with other scientific areas such as sports nutrition or sports psychology and Paralympic sports; (v) rehabilitation, injury prevention, and return to play; (vi) evaluation and treatment of sports injuries; and (vii) nutritional aspects related to physical activity and health.

Dr. Felipe J. Aidar
Dr. Victor M. Reis
Dr. Filipe Manuel Clemente
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • health promotion
  • fatigue monitoring
  • training load monitoring
  • sports
  • Paralympic sport
  • special groups
  • adapted sports
  • biological maturation
  • psychobiological changes
  • immune and endocrine responses
  • neuromuscular performance
  • adaptation to training
  • stress
  • recovery
  • fatigue
  • sleep
  • delayed-onset muscle soreness
  • psychobiological changes
  • immunological responses
  • neuromuscular performance
  • musculoskeletal injuries
  • sports injuries
  • nutritional aspects

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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11 pages, 933 KiB  
Article
Gender-Specific Effects of 8-Week Multi-Modal Strength and Flexibility Training on Hamstring Flexibility and Strength
by Shangxiao Li, Liduan Wang, Jinfeng Xiong and Dandan Xiao
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(22), 15256; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192215256 - 18 Nov 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2015
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of multi-modal strength training or flexibility training on hamstring flexibility and strength in young males and females. A total of 20 male and 20 female college students (aged 18–24 years) participated in this [...] Read more.
The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of multi-modal strength training or flexibility training on hamstring flexibility and strength in young males and females. A total of 20 male and 20 female college students (aged 18–24 years) participated in this study and were randomly assigned to either a multi-modal flexibility intervention group or strength intervention group. Passive straight leg raise and isokinetic strength test were performed before and after the intervention to determine flexibility and strength of the participants. Multivariate repeated-measure ANOVA was used to determine the effect of training group and gender on hamstring strength and flexibility. Both male and female participants in the strength intervention group significantly increased peak torque, relative peak torque, and flexibility (all p ≤ 0.029). Both male and female participants in the flexibility intervention group significantly increased flexibility (both p ≤ 0.001). Female participants in the flexibility intervention group significantly increased peak torque and relative peak torque (both p ≤ 0.023). However, no change was seen in peak torque and relative peak torque of male participants in the flexibility intervention group (p ≥ 0.676). An 8-week strength training program involving various training components can increase flexibility in both males and females, although the flexibility of male participants only increased slightly. While hamstring flexibility training protocol consisted of different types of stretching improved both flexibility and strength in female participants, male participants increased only flexibility but not strength, indicating such effects were gender-specific. For subjects with relatively low strength (e.g., older adults, sedentary women, postoperative rehabilitation population, etc.), strength training alone or flexibility training alone may increase both strength and flexibility. Full article
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13 pages, 4582 KiB  
Article
Mapping Research Trends of Adapted Sport from 2001 to 2020: A Bibliometric Analysis
by Tao Liu, Nicole Wassell, John Liu and Meiqi Zhang
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(19), 12644; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph191912644 - 03 Oct 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2416
Abstract
Objectives: To identify the research landscape in terms of keywords, annual outputs, journals, countries, and institutions and explore the hot topics and prospects regarding adapted sport research. Materials and methods: Publications designated as “article” on adapted sport retrieved from the Web of Science [...] Read more.
Objectives: To identify the research landscape in terms of keywords, annual outputs, journals, countries, and institutions and explore the hot topics and prospects regarding adapted sport research. Materials and methods: Publications designated as “article” on adapted sport retrieved from the Web of Science Core Collection. VOSviewer 1.6.11, Citespace, and Bibliometrix in R Studio were applied for the bibliometric analyses. Results: A total of 1887 articles were identified. Over the past two decades, athletic performance, sociology/psychology, and rehabilitation were extensively investigated. Basketball, soccer, and swimming were the three most focused adapted sports. Researchers showed a growing interest in submitting their studies to sport science, rehabilitation, and sociological journals. Adapted sport research was more common in developed countries and regions. The UK contributed most publications accounting for about 20% of the total publications. Conclusions: With the growth of publications concerning adapted sport, the bibliometric analysis presented an overview of collaboration, trends, and hotspots in the field. Full article
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Review

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19 pages, 762 KiB  
Review
The Sport Training Process of Para-Athletes: A Systematic Review
by Manuel Rodríguez Macías, Francisco Javier Giménez Fuentes-Guerra and Manuel Tomás Abad Robles
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(12), 7242; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19127242 - 13 Jun 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 3158
Abstract
The aim of this systematic review was to identify the main factors affecting the training process of para-athletes, as well as the barriers they encounter. For this purpose, a systematic review was carried out in accordance with the PRISMA declaration guidelines, in which [...] Read more.
The aim of this systematic review was to identify the main factors affecting the training process of para-athletes, as well as the barriers they encounter. For this purpose, a systematic review was carried out in accordance with the PRISMA declaration guidelines, in which six databases were analysed (Web of Science, Scopus, SportDiscus, Pubmed, Eric, and PsycInfo). A total of 19 articles were selected for analysis after applying the inclusion criteria. The results show that the figures of the coach and families in the sporting and social contexts, respectively, had a relevant influence on the training process of para-athletes. Furthermore, in terms of psychological aspects, stress reduction, the importance of self-esteem, and motivation were highlighted. On the other hand, there are some barriers hindering the training and performance of athletes, which are related to the lack of financial support, lack of visibility in the media, and dependence on other people. These considerations can be of great help to coaches and competent institutions in the field (Paralympic committees, federations, etc.) in order to improve the training process and performance of para-athletes and to eliminate the barriers encountered by this group, promoting policies which facilitate access to sports for people with disabilities. Full article
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