Special Issue "Selected Papers of the European Lidar Conference"

A special issue of Remote Sensing (ISSN 2072-4292). This special issue belongs to the section "Atmosphere Remote Sensing".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Lucas Alados-Arboledas
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Applied Physics Department, University of Granada, and Andalusian Research Institute for the Earth System, 18071 Granada, Spain
Interests: atmospheric aerosol; lidar; remote sensing; atmospheric radiation; aerosol–cloud interaction
Prof. Juan Luis Guerrero Rascado
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Applied Physics Department, University of Granada, and Andalusian Research Institute for the Earth System, 18071 Granada, Spain
Interests: atmospheric aerosol; lidar; remote sensing; clouds; aerosol–cloud interaction; bioaerosols
Dr. Juan Antonio Bravo-Aranda
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Applied Physics Department, University of Granada, and Andalusian Research Institute for the Earth System, 18071 Granada, Spain
Interests: atmospheric aerosol; lidar; remote sensing of the atmosphere; clouds; aerosol–cloud interaction
Dr. María José Granados-Muñoz
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Applied Physics Department, University of Granada, and Andalusian Research Institute for the Earth System, 18071 Granada, Spain
Interests: atmospheric aerosol; lidar; radiation; tropospheric ozone; remote sensing of the atmosphere; clouds; aerosol–cloud interaction
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The European Lidar Conference aims to be a suitable environment where lidarists can have a deep and open discussion. For 2.5 days, experts have the opportunity to network, find new and longstanding collaborations, exchange ideas, create novel ones, and be inspired by top-level keynote lectures, to further improve the field of lidar research. In other words, it is a place where lidarists can meet and discuss the very technical aspects of our work around the lidar technique in all its variants (e.g., backscatter- and Doppler lidar, automatic lidar and ceilometers, DIAL, and lidars with Raman and depolarization capabilities). On the occasion of the celebration of the 2nd and 3rd European Lidar Conference, ELC2020 and ELC2021, we encourage all participants to be part of this Special Issue of the journal Remote Sensing. This Special Issue titled ‘Selected Papers of ELC’ is calling for papers reporting the newest advances and scientific results in the Earth’s atmosphere involving ground-, air-, and space-based lidar techniques. Particularly, submissions related to atmospheric anthropogenic/natural aerosol particles, wind, and thermodynamics, aiming to provide a comprehensive assessment of aerosol–radiation interactions, aerosol–cloud interactions, and atmospheric boundary layer dynamics are particularly encouraged. Furthermore, synergistic combinations between lidars and other instrumentation as well as innovative applications are also welcome. Specifically, topics of interest for this Special Issue include (but are not limited to):

  • Lidar technology;
  • Lidar algorithms and data products;
  • Lidar applications;
  • Role of lidars in Cal/Val satellite missions;
  • Atmospheric Boundary Layer and low altitude profiling;
  • Synergies based on lidar techniques.

Prof. Lucas Alados-Arboledas
Prof. Juan Luis Guerrero Rascado
Dr. Juan Antonio Bravo-Aranda
Dr. María José Granados-Muñoz
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Remote Sensing is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • elastic Lidar
  • Raman lidar
  • Doppler lidar
  • fluorescence lidar
  • high spectral resolution lidar
  • Cal/Val satellite lidar missions
  • atmospheric aerosol
  • clouds
  • aerosol–cloud interactions

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Advection of Biomass Burning Aerosols towards the Southern Hemispheric Mid-Latitude Station of Punta Arenas as Observed with Multiwavelength Polarization Raman Lidar
Remote Sens. 2021, 13(1), 138; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13010138 - 04 Jan 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 933
Abstract
In this paper, we present long-term observations of the multiwavelength Raman lidar PollyXT conducted in the framework of the DACAPO-PESO campaign. Regardless of the relatively clean atmosphere in the southern mid-latitude oceans region, we regularly observed events of long-range transported smoke, [...] Read more.
In this paper, we present long-term observations of the multiwavelength Raman lidar PollyXT conducted in the framework of the DACAPO-PESO campaign. Regardless of the relatively clean atmosphere in the southern mid-latitude oceans region, we regularly observed events of long-range transported smoke, originating either from regional sources in South America or from Australia. Two case studies will be discussed, both identified as smoke events that occurred on 5 February 2019 and 11 March 2019. For the first case considered, the lofted smoke layer was located at an altitude between 1.0 and 4.2 km, and apart from the predominance of smoke particles, particle linear depolarization values indicated the presence of dust particles. Mean lidar ratio values at 355 and 532 nm were 49 ± 12 and 24 ± 18 sr respectively, while the mean particle linear depolarization was 7.6 ± 3.6% at 532 nm. The advection of smoke and dust particles above Punta Arenas affected significantly the available cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nucleating particles (INP) in the lower troposphere, and effectively triggered the ice crystal formation processes. Regarding the second case, the thin smoke layers were observed at altitudes 5.5–7.0, 9.0 and 11.0 km. The particle linear depolarization ratio at 532 nm increased rapidly with height, starting from 2% for the lowest two layers and increasing up to 9.5% for the highest layer, indicating the possible presence of non-spherical coated soot aggregates. INP activation was effectively facilitated. The long-term analysis of the one year of observations showed that tropospheric smoke advection over Punta Arenas occurred 16 times (lasting from 1 to 17 h), regularly distributed over the period and with high potential to influence cloud formation in the otherwise pristine environment of the region. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selected Papers of the European Lidar Conference)
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Article
Toward Non-Invasive Measurement of Atmospheric Temperature Using Vibro-Rotational Raman Spectra of Diatomic Gases
Remote Sens. 2020, 12(24), 4129; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs12244129 - 17 Dec 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1031
Abstract
We demonstrate precise determination of atmospheric temperature using vibro-rotational Raman (VRR) spectra of molecular nitrogen and oxygen in the range of 292–293 K. We used a continuous wave fiber laser operating at 10 W near 532 nm as an excitation source in conjunction [...] Read more.
We demonstrate precise determination of atmospheric temperature using vibro-rotational Raman (VRR) spectra of molecular nitrogen and oxygen in the range of 292–293 K. We used a continuous wave fiber laser operating at 10 W near 532 nm as an excitation source in conjunction with a multi-pass cell. First, we show that the approximation that nitrogen and oxygen molecules behave like rigid rotors leads to erroneous derivations of temperature values from VRR spectra. Then, we account for molecular non-rigidity and compare four different methods for the determination of air temperature. Each method requires no temperature calibration. The first method involves fitting the intensity of individual lines within the same branch to their respective transition energies. We also infer temperature by taking ratios of two isolated VRR lines; first from two lines of the same branch, and then one line from the S-branch and one from the O-branch. Finally, we take ratios of groups of lines. Comparing these methods, we found that a precision up to 0.1 K is possible. In the case of O2, a comparison between the different methods show that the inferred temperature was self-consistent to within 1 K. The temperature inferred from N2 differed by as much as 3 K depending on which VRR branch was used. Here we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each method. Our methods can be extended to the development of instrumentation capable of non-invasive monitoring of gas temperature with broad potential applications, for example, in laboratory, ground-based, or airborne remote sensing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selected Papers of the European Lidar Conference)
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Article
Study of the Effect of Aerosol Vertical Profile on Microphysical Properties Using GRASP Code with Sun/Sky Photometer and Multiwavelength Lidar Measurements
Remote Sens. 2020, 12(24), 4072; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs12244072 - 12 Dec 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 582
Abstract
In this paper, we study the effect of the vertical distribution of aerosols on the inversion process to obtain microphysical properties of aerosols. The GRASP code is used to retrieve the aerosol size distribution from two different schemes. Firstly, only sun/sky photometer measurements [...] Read more.
In this paper, we study the effect of the vertical distribution of aerosols on the inversion process to obtain microphysical properties of aerosols. The GRASP code is used to retrieve the aerosol size distribution from two different schemes. Firstly, only sun/sky photometer measurements of aerosol optical depth and sky radiances are used as input to the retrieval code, and then, both this information and the range-corrected signals from an advanced lidar system are provided to the code. Measurements taken at the Madrid EARLINET station, complemented with those from the nearby AERONET station, have been analyzed for the 2016–2019 time range. The effect found of the measured vertical profile on the inversion is a shift to smaller radius of the fine mode with average differences of 0.05 ± 0.02 µm, without noticeable effects for the coarse mode radius. This coarse mode is sometimes split into two modes, related to large AOD or elevated aerosol-rich layers. The first scheme´s retrieved size distributions are also compared with those provided by AERONET, observing the unusual persistence of a large mode centered at 5 µm. These changes in the size distributions affect slightly the radiative forcing calculated also by the GRASP code. A stronger forcing, dependent on the AOD, is observed in the second scheme. The shift in the fine mode and the effect on the radiative forcing indicate the importance of considering the vertical profile of aerosols on the retrieval of microphysical properties by remote sensing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selected Papers of the European Lidar Conference)
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