Special Issue "Earth Observation (EO), Remote Sensing (RS), and Geoinformation (GI) Applications in Svalbard"

A special issue of Remote Sensing (ISSN 2072-4292).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Shridhar D. Jawak
Website
Guest Editor
Svalbard Integrated Arctic Earth Observing System - Knowledge Centre (SIOS-KC), Svalbard Forskningspark, P.O. Box 156, N-9171 Longyearbyen, Svalbard, Norway
Interests: high resolution remote sensing applications in polar regions; glacier facies mapping; polar vegetation mapping; Google Earth Engine; snow and ice remote sensing; glaciological image analysis
Prof. Dr. Andreas Kääb
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Geosciences, University of Oslo, P.O Box 1047, Blindern, 0316 Oslo, Norway.
Interests: Earth Observation technology; glaciology; cryosphere remote sensing; geoinformatics
Prof. Dr. Veijo Pohjola
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University, Geocentrum, Villavägen 16, 752 36 Uppsala, Sweden
Interests: glaciology; mass balance and ice dynamics in Svalbar; firn aquifers and snow distribution
Prof. Hiroyuki Enomoto
Website
Guest Editor
National Institute of Polar Research, 10-3, Midori-cho, Tachikawa-shi, Tokyo 190-8518, Japan
Interests: glaciology; climatology; remote sensing engineering
Dr. Geir Moholdt
Website
Guest Editor
Norwegian Polar Institute, Fram Centre, P.O. Box 6606 Langnes, N-9296 Tromsø, Norway
Interests: remote sensing of the cryosphere glacier and ice-sheet changes
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Kjell Arild Høgda
Website
Guest Editor
NORCE Technology, NORCE Norwegian Research Center AS, Sykehusvn 21, 9019 Tromsø, Norway.
Interests: InSAR; glaciers; airborne data; drones; permafrost; Svalbard vegetation and growing season
Dr. Małgorzata Błaszczyk
Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of Silesia in Katowice, Bankowa 12, 40-007 Katowice, Poland
Interests: remote sensing of polar areas; glaciology
Dr. Bo N. Andersen
Website
Guest Editor
Norwegian Space Agency (NoSA) and Svalbard Integrated Arctic Earth Observing System - Knowledge Centre (SIOS-KC), Svalbard Forskningspark, P.O. Box 156, N-9171 Longyearbyen, Svalbard, Norway.
Interests: Satellite cal/val; Earth Observation and remote sensing applications in Svalbard
Ms. Ann Mari Fjæraa
Website
Guest Editor
Atmosphere and Climate Department, Norwegian Institute for Air Research (NILU), P.O box 100, 2027 Kjeller, Norway.
Interests: Satellite cal/val; Sentinel-5p; Pandora; atmosphere remote sensing applications
Dr. Bartłomiej Luks
Website SciProfiles
Guest Editor
Department of Polar and Marine Research, Institute of Geophysics Polish Academy of Sciences, 01-452 Warszawa, Poland
Interests: snow cover spatial distribution; snow remote sensing; snow hydrology; glaciology; climatology
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Roberto Salzano
Website
Guest Editor
Institute for Atmospheric Pollution Research (IIA), National Research Council of Italy (CNR), Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Italy
Interests: remote sensing of cold regions
Dr. Frode Dinessen
Website
Guest Editor
Remote Sensing and Data Management, Norwegian Meteorological Institute (MET Norway), PO Box 6314 Langnes, 9293 Tromsø, Norway.
Interests: sea ice remote sensing; SAR; passive microwave radiometers

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The Svalbard Integrated Arctic Earth Observing System (SIOS) is an international observing system for long-term in situ and remotely sensed measurements in and around Svalbard addressing Earth System Science (ESS) questions. SIOS research infrastructures (RI) are distributed all over Svalbard for collection of long-term in situ measurements. These in situ measurements are useful for various current and future satellite missions for calibration and validation (cal/val) activities. Eventually, integration of in situ and satellite-based measurements would benefit the entire ESS community to address broader scientific questions. Over the past three decades, tremendous developments in Earth Observation (EO) satellites have made significant contributions to the spatial–spectral–temporal sampling and subsequent extraction of geoinformation (GI) from the Arctic. Svalbard is probably the region in the Arctic with the most in situ measurements; still, there are massive gaps. Such data gaps can be filled using frequent satellite-based acquisitions, new product generation using remote sensing (RS), and integration of in situ data with satellite-based information. This Special Issue will provide a broad platform to various regional and Svalbard-wide studies that are being conducted using EO/RS/GI. For this Special Issue, we seek submissions focusing on:

  • EO/RS/GI techniques relevant for field campaigns, modelling, and long-term monitoring programs;
  • Optical (e.g., Sentinel-2-3), Microwave (e.g., scatterometers, SAR) and Lidar (e.g., ICESat) applications in Svalbard;
  • Terrestrial, marine, atmospheric, and cryospheric applications of RS/EO/GI in Svalbard and associated waters;
  • Remote sensing of the marine cryosphere and its interactions with ocean, land, and atmosphere;
  • Ground-, space-, and airborne platform-based studies in Svalbard;
  • Integration of remote sensing, in situ and previously published geoinformation to gain new knowledge about Svalbard;
  • Cal/val activities for satellite missions that are being conducted in Svalbard, e.g., Pandora installation in Ny Ålesund, cal/val of snow parameters from satellite, cal/val activities using moorings;
  • Machine learning, deep learning, neural networks and cloud computing (e.g., Google Earth Engine) based applications in Svalbard;
  • Broader review papers on EO/RS/GI driven research activities in Svalbard (e.g., review on monitoring calving events in Svalbard);
  • Svalbard wide GI extraction/product generation and operationalization using EO/RS;
  • Derivation of geophysical and biophysical parameters using satellites (e.g., sea ice drift and type, chlorophyll concentration, phytoplankton blooms);
  • Remote sensing applications in glaciological studies in Svalbard (geodetic mass balance, snow cover and snow properties, surface elevation changes, etc.;
  • Remote sensing of sea ice, icebergs, snow/firn/ice, ground ice, snow on sea ice, avalanche activities, permafrost subsidence studies using InSAR
  • Methods for characterizing the terrestrial vegetation, mapping abundance and extent, growing season, primary productivity, and time series analysis;
  • Applications of new technologies such as AUVs, robots, drones, mapping using Surface from Motion, terrestrial LiDAR;
  • Very high resolution (VHR) satellite remote sensing in Svalbard including applications using airborne imagery and hyperspectral data acquired by SIOS-NORCE research aircraft and drones;
  • Relevant research studies supported by the SIOS-ACCESS, SIOS-SESS, and SIOS-InfraNor initiative.

We especially encourage contributors to provide access of data and products generated as a part of study via the SIOS data management system (SDMS).

Dr. Shridhar D. Jawak
Prof. Dr. Veijo Pohjola
Prof. Dr. Andreas Kääb
Prof. Hiroyuki Enomoto
Dr. Geir Moholdt
Dr. Kjell Arild Høgda
Dr. Malgorzata Blaszczyk
Dr. Bo N. Andersen
Ms. Ann Mari Fjæraa
Dr. Bartłomiej Luks
Dr. Roberto Salzano
Dr. Frode Dinessen
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Remote Sensing is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Svalbard
  • Arctic
  • SIOS
  • research infrastructures
  • new sensors
  • cal/val
  • geospatial product generation
  • UAV/drones
  • research aircraft
  • permafrost
  • arctic vegetation
  • glaciology
  • Infranor

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Does the Intra-Arctic Modification of Long-Range Transported Aerosol Affect the Local Radiative Budget? (A Case Study)
Remote Sens. 2020, 12(13), 2112; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs12132112 - 01 Jul 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
The impact of aerosol spatio-temporal variability on the Arctic radiative budget is not fully constrained. This case study focuses on the intra-Arctic modification of long-range transported aerosol and its direct aerosol radiative effect (ARE). Different types of air-borne and ground-based remote sensing observations [...] Read more.
The impact of aerosol spatio-temporal variability on the Arctic radiative budget is not fully constrained. This case study focuses on the intra-Arctic modification of long-range transported aerosol and its direct aerosol radiative effect (ARE). Different types of air-borne and ground-based remote sensing observations (from Lidar and sun-photometer) revealed a high tropospheric aerosol transport episode over two parts of the European Arctic in April 2018. By incorporating the derived aerosol optical and microphysical properties into a radiative transfer model, we assessed the ARE over the two locations. Our study displayed that even in neighboring Arctic upper tropospheric levels, aged aerosol was transformed due to the interplay of removal processes (nucleation scavenging and dry deposition) and alteration of the aerosol source regions (northeast Asia and north Europe). Along the intra-Arctic transport, the coarse aerosol mode was depleted and the visible wavelength Lidar ratio (LR) increased significantly (from 15 to 64–82 sr). However, the aerosol modifications were not reflected on the ARE. More specifically, the short-wave (SW) atmospheric column ARE amounted to +4.4 - +4.9 W m−2 over the ice-covered Fram Strait and +4.5 W m−2 over the snow-covered Ny-Ålesund. Over both locations, top-of-atmosphere (TOA) warming was accompanied by surface cooling. These similarities can be attributed to the predominant accumulation mode, which drives the SW radiative budget, as well as to the similar layer altitude, solar geometry, and surface albedo conditions over both locations. However, in the context of retreating sea ice, the ARE may change even along individual transport episodes due to the ice albedo feedback. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
A 20-Year MODIS-Based Snow Cover Dataset for Svalbard and Its Link to Phenological Timing and Sea Ice Variability
Remote Sens. 2020, 12(7), 1123; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs12071123 - 01 Apr 2020
Abstract
The climate in Svalbard has been warming dramatically compared with the global average for the last few decades. Seasonal snow cover, which is sensitive to temperature and precipitation changes, is therefore expected to undergo both spatial and temporal changes in response to the [...] Read more.
The climate in Svalbard has been warming dramatically compared with the global average for the last few decades. Seasonal snow cover, which is sensitive to temperature and precipitation changes, is therefore expected to undergo both spatial and temporal changes in response to the changing climate in Svalbard. This will in turn have implications for timing of terrestrial productivity, which is closely linked to the disappearance of seasonal snow. We have produced a 20-year snow cover fraction time series for the Svalbard archipelago, derived from MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) Terra data to map and identify changes in the timing of the first snow-free day (FSFD) for the period 2000–2019. Moreover, we investigate the influence of sea ice concentration (SIC) variations on FSFD and how FSFD is related to the start of the phenological growing season in Svalbard. Our results revealed clear patterns of earlier FSFD in the southern and central parts of the archipelago, while the northernmost parts exhibit little change or trend toward later FSFD, resulting in weaker trends in summer and winter duration. We found that FSFD preceded the onset of the phenological growing season with an average difference of 12.4 days for the entire archipelago, but with large regional variations that are indicative of temperature dependence. Lastly, we found a significant correlation between variations of time-integrated SIC and variations in FSFD, which maximizes when correlating SIC northeast of Svalbard with FSFD averaged over Nordaustlandet. Prolonged sea ice cover in the spring was correlated with late snow disappearance, while lower-than-average sea ice cover correlated with early snow disappearance, indicating that proximity to sea ice plays an important role in regulating the timing of snow disappearance on land through influencing the regional air temperature and therefore rate of spring snowmelt. Full article
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