Special Issue "Plants as Functional Food Ingredients and Food Preservative"

A special issue of Processes (ISSN 2227-9717). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Processes".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 October 2022 | Viewed by 2073

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Joanna Kobus-Cisowska
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Food Scinces and Nutrition, Poznan University of Live Sciences, ul Wojska Polskiego 28, 60-637 Poznan, Poland
Interests: polyphenols; antioxidants; functional food; bioactive food; enzyme; health; oxidation; fat
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Sylwester Czaplicki
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Food Sciences, University of Warmia and Mazury, Plac Cieszyński 1, 10-726 Olsztyn, Poland
Interests: food technology; chromatography in food analysis (HPLC-MS/MS, GC-MS/MS) plant bioactive compounds analysis; polyphenols; food lipids; oxidation; antioxidants

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Functional foods are special food products with beneficial health effects, containing nutrients and non-nutrients, as well as food from which health-undesirable ingredients have been removed or significantly reduced, thereby having a desired and intended effect on one or more functions of the body.

In order to prevent dangerous diseases and improper eating habits, effective countermeasures are sought. Thus, in highly developed countries, functional food is represented by numerous products commonly obtained, which meet the expectations of consumers. The functional food market develops faster than the rest of the food market. Specialized consortia and companies are established, cooperating with research centers in order to design and implement new types of functional food for production. Functional foods, based on products of plant origin, as well as products considered functional, are assigned the role of supporting the body in maintaining good physical and mental condition and supporting the prevention and even treatment of certain diseases. Functional food bioactive ingredients are those that have a positive effect on health, such as, above all, dietary fiber, oligosaccharides, proteins, amino acids, polyphenols, peptides, unsaturated fatty acids, vitamins, coenzyme Q, flavonoids, anthocyanins, minerals, choline, lecithin, L-carnitine, phytochemicals and probiotics. The richest sources of these compounds are legumes, brassica, oilseeds, vegetables and fruits, as well as herbs and spices. Their health significance lies not only in the properties’ antioxidants, but also in their ability to participate in many metabolic processes that strengthen the body's immune system.

This Special Issue on “Plants as Functional Food Ingredients and Food Preservative” aims to curate novel advances in the development and application of functional food. Topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Bioactive ingredients in functional food
  • New sources of bioactive ingredients
  • Influence of bioactive ingredients on the properties of functional food
  • Transformation of ingredients in functional food during storage
  • The role of bioactive ingredients in diet and nutrition
  • Plants as food preservative

Prof. Dr. Joanna Kobus-Cisowska
Prof. Dr. Sylwester Czaplicki
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Processes is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • functional food
  • bioactive ingredients
  • role of bioactive ingredients
  • vitamins
  • minerals, polyphenols
  • storage

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Development of Evaluation Methods for Anti-Glycation Activity and Functional Ingredients Contained in Coriander and Fennel Seeds
Processes 2022, 10(5), 982; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr10050982 - 14 May 2022
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Abstract
Spices are known to have various physiological functions. We focused on the anti-glycation effects of spices, researched anti-glycation active ingredients in coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) and fennel (Foeniculum vulgare) seeds, and conducted experiments using human skin-derived fibroblast TIG-110 cells as [...] Read more.
Spices are known to have various physiological functions. We focused on the anti-glycation effects of spices, researched anti-glycation active ingredients in coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) and fennel (Foeniculum vulgare) seeds, and conducted experiments using human skin-derived fibroblast TIG-110 cells as a model of glycation. We isolated 11 compounds from two spice seeds and found several substances that showed anti-glycation activity. A new compound (5,5′-diallyl-2,2′-diglucopyranosyl-3,3′-dimethoxy diphenyl ether) was isolated from fennel seeds and showed high anti-glycation activity with an IC50 value of 0.08 mM, thereby indicating a high anti-glycosylation activity. In this study, we established a glyoxal (GO)-induced glycation test method for human skin cells, confirmed the anti-glycation effect of spice seeds using this glycation induction model, and found that the exposure of TIG-110 human skin-derived fibroblast cells to GO reduced cell viability. The most stable conditions for cell viability were found to be a GO concentration of 1.25 mM and a culture time of 48 h. We evaluated extracts and isolates of spice seeds using this model as a model test for glycation induction. We conducted qualitative and quantitative analyses of carboxymethyl lysine (CML), a type of AGE, to determine the relationship between cell viability and AGEs. The relationship between cell viability and the amount of CML was correlated. Establishing a glycation induction model test using skin cells makes it possible to quickly screen extracts of natural ingredients in the future. Moreover, the results of this model showed that extracts of two spice seeds and their isolates have high anti-glycation activity, and they are expected to be used as cosmetics, health foods, and pharmaceutical ingredients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plants as Functional Food Ingredients and Food Preservative)
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Article
Functional Ingredients and Food Preservative in Immature Persimmon “Tekka-Kaki”
Processes 2021, 9(11), 1989; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr9111989 - 08 Nov 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 422
Abstract
Immature persimmons are unripe fruits that are cut off during the persimmon cultivation process and immediately discarded, amounting to an annual fruit loss of approximately 100 to 400 kg per 1000 m2. The purpose of this study was to make effective [...] Read more.
Immature persimmons are unripe fruits that are cut off during the persimmon cultivation process and immediately discarded, amounting to an annual fruit loss of approximately 100 to 400 kg per 1000 m2. The purpose of this study was to make effective use of unused resources, namely, immature persimmons, and attempt to use them as food additives. In this study, we studied the Tone Wase (fully astringent persimmon) and Fuyu (fully sweet persimmon) cultivars. As a result, we performed a component analysis of the immature persimmons, isolating 12 compounds, of which two were newly identified. Differences in the components and their contents were found between cultivars and between the peel and flesh. To effectively use immature persimmons as food for the elderly, we searched for active substances that inhibit AGE formation and found that extracts of immature persimmons and isolated compounds showed high activity. In particular, high activity was observed for catechin and its polymeric form, procyanidin. Regarding the inhibition of aroma deterioration, 5 mg/L of gallic acid in octadecane was found to be the optimal condition for the inhibition of citral deterioration. As for antimicrobial activity, we found that extracts at a concentration of 500 mg/L had no antimicrobial effect. Based on these findings, we made a microencapsulation process, and plan to advance to the clinical trial study in future. These findings confirmed the effectiveness of immature persimmons, which are an unused resource, and reveal their potential as a food for the elderly and as a food additive in other food products, which we hope will lead to new industrial innovations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plants as Functional Food Ingredients and Food Preservative)
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Article
Polyphenolic Herbal Extract of Cistus incanus as Natural Preservatives for Sausages Enriched with Natural Colors
Processes 2021, 9(9), 1556; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr9091556 - 31 Aug 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 780
Abstract
This study evaluates the effects of polyphenolic extract of Cistus incanus, lycopene dye from tomatoes, and betanin dye from red beet on selected parameters of model meat products with reduced nitrate contents. The polyphenolic composition and activity of the C. incanus extract [...] Read more.
This study evaluates the effects of polyphenolic extract of Cistus incanus, lycopene dye from tomatoes, and betanin dye from red beet on selected parameters of model meat products with reduced nitrate contents. The polyphenolic composition and activity of the C. incanus extract was analyzed, revealing the presence of elagotannins, flavanols, and glycosylated flavanols. We studied the effects of the extract and dyes as well as of mixtures of the extract and dyes on the growth of bacteria characteristic of the meat environment: E. coli, S. enterica, P. fragi, L. monocytogenes, B. thermosphacta, and L. sakei. We studied the effects of the extract and dyes on the lipid oxidation, color, and microbiological quality of pork sausages with reduced nitrate content over 28 days of storage. During storage, the amounts of malon dialdehyde reduced, which indicates that the extract and dyes exhibited antioxidant activity and slowed lipid oxidation in the sausages. An increase in red color was also observed in the sausages with natural additives, despite their decreased nitrate content. It was found that the C. incanus extract combined with coloring agents positively influenced the selected parameters of the analyzed pork sausages. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plants as Functional Food Ingredients and Food Preservative)
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