Special Issue "Protein Biosynthesis and Drug Design & Delivery Processes"

A special issue of Processes (ISSN 2227-9717). This special issue belongs to the section "Biological Systems".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Mahesh Narayan
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP), El Paso, TX 79968, USA
Interests: protein folding, docking, halogen bonding, reactive oxygen species, neurodegenerative disorders, drug-discovery, chemical education
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

From the initial, epoch-making work of Bruce Merrifield and solid-phase peptide synthesis, the era of protein biosynthesis, along with drug-delivery and processes, has come a long way. Having mastered methods to introduce unnatural amino acids, and moieties of interest into protein chains, we are now firmly in the era of biologicals. Matching these efforts and surpassing them will enable us to make inroads into drug-design and delivery processes. While in silico computational approaches remain the mainstay of the drug development pipeline, novel delivery systems embrace nanotechnology to enhance delivery efficacy and specificity.

In this Special Issue, we cover advances in protein biosynthesis, drug-design, and delivery processes and remark on the future of these arenas.

Prof. Dr. Mahesh Narayan
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Processes is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • protein ligand
  • protein biosynthesis
  • docking
  • biologicals
  • liposomes
  • in silico
  • drug-design
  • bodning
  • force-field

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Article
Evaluation of Oleic Acid and Polyethylene Glycol Monomethyl Ether Conjugate (PEGylated Oleic Acid) as a Solubility Enhancer of Furosemide
Processes 2019, 7(8), 520; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr7080520 - 07 Aug 2019
Viewed by 1337
Abstract
Poor aqueous solubility limits the therapeutic efficacy of many marketed and investigational drugs. Synthesis of new drugs with improved solubility is challenging due to time constraint and expenses involved. Therefore, finding the solubility enhancers for existing drugs is an attractive and profitable strategy. [...] Read more.
Poor aqueous solubility limits the therapeutic efficacy of many marketed and investigational drugs. Synthesis of new drugs with improved solubility is challenging due to time constraint and expenses involved. Therefore, finding the solubility enhancers for existing drugs is an attractive and profitable strategy. In this study, PEGylated oleic acid (OA-mPEG5000), a conjugate of oleic acid and mPEG5000 was synthesized and evaluated as a solubilizer for furosemide. OA-mPEG5000 was evaluated as a nanocarrier for furosemide by formulating polymersomes. Solubility of furosemide in milli-Q water and aqueous OA-mPEG5000 solution was determined using shake flask method. At 37 °C, the solubility of furosemide in OA-mPEG5000 (1% w/w) and milli-Q water was 3404.7 ± 254.6 µg/mL and 1020.2 ± 40.9 µg/mL, respectively. Results showed there was a 3.34-fold increase in solubility of furosemide in OA-mPEG5000 compared to water at 37 °C. At 25 °C, there was a 3.31-fold increase in solubilization of furosemide in OA-mPEG5000 (1% w/w) (90.0 ± 1.45 µg/mL) compared to milli-Q water (27.2 ± 1.43 µg/mL). Size, polydispersity index and zeta potential of polymersomes ranged from 85–145.5 nm, 0.187–0.511 and −4.0–12.77 mV, respectively. In-vitro release study revealed a burst release (71%) within 1 h. Significant enhancement in solubility and formation of polymersomes suggested that OA-mPEG5000 could be a good solubilizer and nanocarrier for furosemide. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Protein Biosynthesis and Drug Design & Delivery Processes)
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Article
Preparation and Characterization of Furosemide-Silver Complex Loaded Chitosan Nanoparticles
Processes 2019, 7(4), 206; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr7040206 - 11 Apr 2019
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1388
Abstract
Antibiotic-resistant bacteria may result in serious infections which are difficult to treat. In addition, the poor antibiotic pipeline has contributed to the crisis. Recently, a complex of furosemide and silver (Ag-FSE) has been reported as a potential antibacterial agent. However, its poor aqueous [...] Read more.
Antibiotic-resistant bacteria may result in serious infections which are difficult to treat. In addition, the poor antibiotic pipeline has contributed to the crisis. Recently, a complex of furosemide and silver (Ag-FSE) has been reported as a potential antibacterial agent. However, its poor aqueous solubility is limiting its activity. The purpose of this study was to encapsulate Ag-FSE into chitosan nanoparticles (CSNPs) and evaluate antibacterial efficacy. Ag-FSE CSNPs were prepared using an ionic gelation technique. The particle size, polydispersity index, and zeta potential of Ag-FSE CSNPs were 197.1 ± 3.88 nm 0.234 ± 0.018 and 36.7 ± 1.78 mV, respectively. Encapsulation efficiency was 66.72 ± 4.14%. In vitro antibacterial activity results showed that there was 3- and 6-fold enhanced activity with Ag-FSE CSNPs against E. coli and S. aureus, respectively. Results also confirmed that Ag-FSE CSNPs showed ~44% release within 4 h at pH 5.5 and 6.5. Moreover, release from the CSNPs was sustained with a cumulative release of ~75% over a period of 24 h. In conclusion, encapsulation of Ag-FSE into CSNPs resulted in significant improvement of antibacterial efficacy with a sustained and pH-sensitive release. Therefore, Ag-FSE CSNPs can be considered as a potential novel antibacterial agent against bacterial infections. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Protein Biosynthesis and Drug Design & Delivery Processes)
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Commentary
Untangling the Potential of Carbon Quantum Dots in Neurodegenerative Disease
Processes 2020, 8(5), 599; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr8050599 - 18 May 2020
Viewed by 1907
Abstract
The transitioning of carbon quantum dot (cQD) applications from electrochemistry, catalysis and environmental sensing to biomedicine represents an important milestone in its 15-year history; a bellwether for its yet-unrealized potential in interventional biology, imaging, diagnostics, prophylaxis and therapy. However, despite the significant advances [...] Read more.
The transitioning of carbon quantum dot (cQD) applications from electrochemistry, catalysis and environmental sensing to biomedicine represents an important milestone in its 15-year history; a bellwether for its yet-unrealized potential in interventional biology, imaging, diagnostics, prophylaxis and therapy. However, despite the significant advances made over the last decade in several areas of the cQD domain, our knowledge of the exact chemical ipseity of cQDs at the Angstrom level remains either in its infancy or is largely ignored. The imminent crossing over of cQDs into biological systems and into the blood–brain barrier demands attention to the critical, yet unmet, need to resolve the inherent heterogeneity in cQD preparations and their separation into purified conformers, to identify the issues associated with potential cytotoxicity as well as to examine their bioavailability. Perhaps most importantly, and ironically neglected as well, is the compelling urgency to obtain an atomic- and molecular-level understanding of cQD’s interactions with biological receptors; a demand that requires absolute knowledge of its structure, chemistry and aspects therein. The need for the total chemical mapping of cQDs, with Angstrom-level resolution, remains the unrealized cornerstone to tailoring its specificity for its designated use in preclinical and clinical trials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Protein Biosynthesis and Drug Design & Delivery Processes)
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Opinion
Influence of Carbon Quantum Dots on the Biome
Processes 2020, 8(4), 445; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr8040445 - 10 Apr 2020
Viewed by 1147
Abstract
The latest class of engineered nanomaterials, viz., carbon quantum dots (CQDs), has attracted attention because they are synthesized through green chemical procedures and from organic waste matter. The synthesis of these nano-sized particles synthesized from biomass such as fruit peel and other organic [...] Read more.
The latest class of engineered nanomaterials, viz., carbon quantum dots (CQDs), has attracted attention because they are synthesized through green chemical procedures and from organic waste matter. The synthesis of these nano-sized particles synthesized from biomass such as fruit peel and other organic matter results in mixtures of CQD species that differ in chemical identity, activity and photo-physical properties. Generally used collectively as chemically heterogeneous ensemble, they have already had an impact on multiple sectors of our environment by use as wastewater sensors, switches, model agro-fertilizers, and in biomedicine. The transitioning of their applications to crops is an important crossover point that calls for an accurate and detailed assessment of their genomic, proteomic, and metabolomics impact on agriculturally important crops and produce. We review the current status of CQDs vis-à-vis their impact on the biosphere via recent model studies and comment on the knowledge gaps that need to be bridged to ensure their safe use in agronomy. A detailed knowledge of their impact on aquatic systems and the food-chain is critical for human and environmental safety and sustainability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Protein Biosynthesis and Drug Design & Delivery Processes)
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