Special Issue "Extraction Optimization Processes of Antioxidants"

A special issue of Processes (ISSN 2227-9717). This special issue belongs to the section "Biological Systems".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Francesca Blasi
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Perugia, Via San Costanzo, 06126 Perugia, Italy
Interests: lipids; antioxidants; gas-chromatography; vegetable extracts
Prof. Lina Cossignani
Website
Co-Guest Editor
University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy
Interests: structured lipids; innovative extraction techniques; food waste; liquid chromatography
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

It is scientifically evident that the increased consumption of antioxidant-rich foods is associated with a reduction of chronic disease risk. The use of natural antioxidants, such as polyphenols, has increased in the food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical fields. Since some synthetic antioxidants show negative health effects, at present, there is the necessity to replace them with natural compounds. It has been reported that that vegetable extracts can also be used as an alternative for the treatment of different diseases, among them obesity and diabetes. However, there are various and not universally accepted methods for extracting antioxidant compounds from foods and waste (i.e., fruits, herbs, legumes, berries, shrubs, algae, roots). Usually, these methods are based on the use of pure solvents or mixtures with different polarities and should take into consideration the chemical structure of the antioxidants and the different structural and compositive characteristics of vegetable matrices. Based on this consideration, special attention must be given to the research of the best conditions for maximizing antioxidant extraction from vegetable foods and byproducts, focusing research on the development of new optimized extraction methodologies, also based on response surface methodology.

This Special Issue on “Extraction Optimization Processes of Antioxidants” aims to curate novel advances in the development and application of sustainable extraction methods also to address the recovery of waste products. Topics include but are not limited to:

  • Development of new extraction methods to improve yield and selectivity of processes;
  • Chemical–analytical characterization and evaluation of bioactivity of vegetable extracts;
  • Optimization of extraction process to drive on-large scale methods toward sustainability;
  • Development of green innovative process to obtain the recovery of waste products.

Dr. Francesca Blasi
Prof. Lina Cossignani
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Processes is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Please note that for papers submitted after 30 June 2020 an APC of 1500 CHF applies. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • bioactive compounds
  • biological activity
  • enzymes
  • innovative processes
  • waste
  • sustainability
  • response surface methodology
  • green chemistry
  • byproducts
  • analytical characterization

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Antioxidant Activity and Sensory Improvement of Angelica dahurica cv. Yubaizhi Essential Oil on Sunflower Oil during High-temperature Storage
Processes 2020, 8(4), 403; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr8040403 - 30 Mar 2020
Abstract
The oxidative state of sunflower oil during high-temperature storage has been facing large challenges. In the study, the antioxidant effect of the essential oil of Angelica dahurica cv. Yubaizhi (ADEO) in sunflower oil was explored. In the high-temperature storage for 24 days at [...] Read more.
The oxidative state of sunflower oil during high-temperature storage has been facing large challenges. In the study, the antioxidant effect of the essential oil of Angelica dahurica cv. Yubaizhi (ADEO) in sunflower oil was explored. In the high-temperature storage for 24 days at 65 °C, ADEO (800 ppm) was able to markedly inhibit the development of the acid value (AV), peroxide value (PV), p-anisidine value (AnV), total oxidation value (TOTOX), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), total polar compounds (TPC), and the absorbance at 232 and 268 nm (p < 0.01 or p < 0.05) of sunflower oil and to prominently inhibit the transformation between unsaturated fatty acids (UFA) and saturated fatty acids (SFA). Interestingly, the synergistic effect of ADEO (400 ppm) and tert-butyl hydroquinone (TBHQ, 100 ppm) was demonstrated. Furthermore, the sensory attributes such as flavor, taste, and overall acceptability of oxidized sunflower oil added by ADEO at 200, 400, and 800 ppm were memorably elevated (p < 0.05). Besides, one of its main compounds, myrcene, was demonstrated to be its active compound during the whole investigation. Consequently, TBHQ at 200 ppm could be substituted by ADEO at 800 ppm and myrcene at 69.8 ppm in the high-temperature storage at 65 °C of sunflower oil. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Extraction Optimization Processes of Antioxidants)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Low-Molecular-Weight Phenols Recovery by Eco-Friendly Extraction from Quercus Spp. Wastes: An Analytical and Biomass-Sustainability Evaluation
Processes 2020, 8(4), 387; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr8040387 - 26 Mar 2020
Abstract
In this work, chemical–physical protocols aimed at the implementation of eco-friendly and biomass-sustainable recovery processes of useful compounds from forestry and/or wood industry wastes were evaluated. Four species of interest in industrial and environmental fields (Quercus cerris, Quercus ilex, and [...] Read more.
In this work, chemical–physical protocols aimed at the implementation of eco-friendly and biomass-sustainable recovery processes of useful compounds from forestry and/or wood industry wastes were evaluated. Four species of interest in industrial and environmental fields (Quercus cerris, Quercus ilex, and Robinia pseudoacacia from Central Italy, Quercus petraea from France) were submitted to neutral extraction and analyzed by gaschromatography, with mass spectrometry identification of low-molecular-weight phenols. Moreover, Quercus petraea heartwood samples were submitted to three extraction/hydrolysis protocols in an alkaline environment, and the byproducts from the lignin degradation were identified and evaluated. The recovery of bioactive phenols from forestry wastes by applying eco-friendly extractive protocols may reveal a precious strategy for rethinking the management of such wastes, in line with the fundamentals of “circular economy”. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Extraction Optimization Processes of Antioxidants)
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Open AccessArticle
Optimizing the Extraction of Polysaccharides from Bletilla ochracea Schltr. Using Response Surface Methodology (RSM) and Evaluating their Antioxidant Activity
Processes 2020, 8(3), 341; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr8030341 - 16 Mar 2020
Abstract
Bletilla ochracea Schltr. polysaccharides (BOP) have a similar structure to Bletilla striata (Thunb.) Reichb.f. (Orchidaceae) polysaccharides (BSP). Therefore, BOP can be considered as a substitute for BSP in the food, pharmaceuticals and cosmetics fields. To the best of our knowledge, little information is [...] Read more.
Bletilla ochracea Schltr. polysaccharides (BOP) have a similar structure to Bletilla striata (Thunb.) Reichb.f. (Orchidaceae) polysaccharides (BSP). Therefore, BOP can be considered as a substitute for BSP in the food, pharmaceuticals and cosmetics fields. To the best of our knowledge, little information is available regarding the optimization of extraction and antioxidant activity of BOP. In this study, response surface methodology (RSM) was firstly used for optimizing the extraction parameters of BOP. The results suggested that the optimal conditions included a temperature of 82 °C, a duration of 85 min and a liquid/material ratio of 30 mL/g. In these conditions, we received 26.45% ± 0.18% as the experimental yield. In addition, BOP exhibited strong concentration-dependent antioxidant abilities in vitro. The half-maximal effective concentration (EC50) values of BOP against 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH·), 2,2′-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonate) (ABTS+·), hydroxyl (·OH) and superoxide anion (·O2) radicals and ferrous ions (Fe2+) were determined as 692.16, 224.09, 542.22, 600.53 and 515.70 µg/mL, respectively. In conclusion, our results indicate that BOP can be a potential natural antioxidant, deserving further investigation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Extraction Optimization Processes of Antioxidants)
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Open AccessArticle
Anti-Melanogenesis, Antioxidant and Anti-Tyrosinase Activities of Scabiosa columbaria L.
Processes 2020, 8(2), 236; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr8020236 - 19 Feb 2020
Abstract
Scabiosa columbaria is a plant traditionally used to treat skin ailments, such as scabies, wound bruises, sores and hyperpigmentation. To find a novel skin depigmenting agent, the present study was investigated to determine the possible anti-melanogenesis, antioxidant and anti-tyrosinase effects of methanol extract [...] Read more.
Scabiosa columbaria is a plant traditionally used to treat skin ailments, such as scabies, wound bruises, sores and hyperpigmentation. To find a novel skin depigmenting agent, the present study was investigated to determine the possible anti-melanogenesis, antioxidant and anti-tyrosinase effects of methanol extract of S. columbaria leaves. Cytotoxicity towards human dermal fibroblast (MRHF) cells was assessed using the live-cell fluorescence imaging microscopy. The inhibitory effects of the extract on tyrosinase, collagenase and melanin synthesis were also investigated using standard in vitro method, while ferric reducing power (FRAP) was used to determine the antioxidant potential of the plant extract. The effect of the extract on collagen content in MRHF cells was also investigated. The plant extract displayed no meaningful cytotoxicity towards MRHF cells and no significant cell death was recorded at all the tested concentrations. The extract (25–100 µg/mL) effectively decreased melanin content in B16F10 (mouse melanoma) cells with moderate inhibition of tyrosinase enzyme in a dose-dependent manner. However, the extract also demonstrated no significant effect on collagenase and collagen content in MRHF cells, but showed strong antioxidant activity at the concentrations tested. The results suggest that S. columbaria could be a promising candidate in the treatment of skin hyperpigmentation disorders Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Extraction Optimization Processes of Antioxidants)
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Open AccessArticle
Antiproliferative, Antimicrobial, and Antifungal Activities of Polyphenol Extracts from Ferocactus Species
Processes 2020, 8(2), 138; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr8020138 - 21 Jan 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Polyphenols, obtained from natural resources, may possess important pharmacological effects. The polyphenolic profiles of the stem extracts of six Ferocactus species (sp.): F. gracilis, F. pottsii, F. herrerae, F. horridus, F. glaucescens, and F. emoryi, were measured [...] Read more.
Polyphenols, obtained from natural resources, may possess important pharmacological effects. The polyphenolic profiles of the stem extracts of six Ferocactus species (sp.): F. gracilis, F. pottsii, F. herrerae, F. horridus, F. glaucescens, and F. emoryi, were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with diode-array detection (DAD). Additionally, anticancer, antibacterial, and antifungal activities were examined. Results showed the presence of high to moderate amounts of polyphenols in the extracts (phenolic acids: Protocatechuic acid, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, caffeic acid, and vanillic acid; flavonoids: Rutoside and quercitrin). The highest amounts of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid were found in F. glaucescens ((132.09 mg 100 g−1 dry weight (DW)), F. pottsii (75.71 mg 100 g−1 DW), and F. emoryi (69.14 mg 100 g−1 DW) while rutoside content was highest in F. glaucescens (107.66 mg 100 g−1 DW). Maximum antiproliferative activities were observed against HeLa and Jurkat cancer cells, with F. glaucescens, F. emoryi, and F. pottsii showing the highest anticancer activity. Most bacteria were sensitive to Ferocactus sp. stem extracts. Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus were the most sensitive. Excellent antifungal effects were observed against Aspergillus ochraceus and A. niger. However, Penicillium funiculosum, P. ochrochloron, and Candida albicans were relatively resistant. This is the first study reporting novel sources of polyphenols in Ferocactus sp. with anticancer and antimicrobial activities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Extraction Optimization Processes of Antioxidants)
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