Special Issue "ROS Responses in Plants"

A special issue of Plants (ISSN 2223-7747). This special issue belongs to the section "Plant Physiology and Metabolism".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 December 2019.

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Jun’ichi Mano Website E-Mail
Science Research Center, Yamaguchi University, 753-8515 Yamaguchi, Japan
Phone: +81-83-933-5945
Interests: reactive oxygen species (ROS) signaling; reactive carbonyl species; oxylipin; environmental stress; programmed cell death
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Yoshiyuki Murata Website E-Mail
Graduate School of Environmental and Life Science, Okayama University, 700-8530 Okayama, Japan
Phone: +81-86-251-8310
Interests: reactive oxygen species (ROS) signaling; stomatal movement; Ca2+ signaling; guard cell signaling; ion channels
Guest Editor
Prof. Kazuyuki Kuchitsu Website E-Mail
Department of Applied Biological Science, Faculty of Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, 278-8510 Noda, Japan
Phone: +81-4-7122-9404
Interests: reactive oxygen species (ROS) in immunity; stress responses; development; reproduction, and programmed cell death in plants; Ca2+ signaling

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Reactive oxygen species (ROS) designates O2-derived reactive molecules including the superoxide anion radical, hydrogen peroxide, singlet oxygen, and the hydroxyl radical. The critical significance of ROS in various aspects of plant life—ranging from the reprogramming during development to the defense response against stress and programmed cell death—is well accepted, and the terms ‘oxidative stress’ and ‘ROS signaling’ are now very often seen in articles in plant sciences. On the other hand, our understanding of the mechanisms of ROS action has been hampered by the nature of ROS in cells: they have high reactivity and their levels are kept very low by abundant antioxidants. The current study of ROS in plants and animals presents many challenges, for example: (i) In which cell compartments (or membranes) are distinct ROS produced and where do they react with their targets? (ii) Is an observed increase in ROS level the cause of cell damage or just a resulting symptom of it? (iii) In ROS-mediated signaling, how can ROS, rather universal species, induce a response specific to the original stimulus? (iv) What is the identity of ROS signal receptors and sensors? (v) By what biochemical mechanisms are ROS signals recognized and transmitted? (vi) How can ROS signal be allowed to travel among organelles and even cells, in a situation in which cells are filled with antioxidants? (vii) What biochemical factors determine cell’s fate, i.e., defense (survival) or death, upon ROS stimulus?

To improve our understanding, several breakthroughs in technology and in knowledge are required. In this Special Issue, we would like to invite research articles and reviews that tackle these challenges and explore new horizons of ROS study in plants.

Prof. Jun’ichi Mano
Prof. Yoshiyuki Murata
Prof. Kazuyuki Kuchitsu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Plants is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • ROS signaling
  • hormonal response
  • environmental stress
  • defense responses and plant immunity
  • programmed cell death
  • plant development
  • reactive electrophiles
  • protein thiol modification
  • apoplast
  • cell wall

Published Papers (5 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle
Understanding the Role of the Antioxidant System and the Tetrapyrrole Cycle in Iron Deficiency Chlorosis
Plants 2019, 8(9), 348; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants8090348 - 13 Sep 2019
Abstract
Iron deficiency chlorosis (IDC) is an abiotic stress often experienced by soybean, owing to the low solubility of iron in alkaline soils. Here, soybean lines with contrasting Fe efficiencies were analyzed to test the hypothesis that the Fe efficiency trait is linked to [...] Read more.
Iron deficiency chlorosis (IDC) is an abiotic stress often experienced by soybean, owing to the low solubility of iron in alkaline soils. Here, soybean lines with contrasting Fe efficiencies were analyzed to test the hypothesis that the Fe efficiency trait is linked to antioxidative stress signaling via proper management of tissue Fe accumulation and transport, which in turn influences the regulation of heme and non heme containing enzymes involved in Fe uptake and ROS scavenging. Inefficient plants displayed higher oxidative stress and lower ferric reductase activity, whereas root and leaf catalase activity were nine-fold and three-fold higher, respectively. Efficient plants do not activate their antioxidant system because there is no formation of ROS under iron deficiency; while inefficient plants are not able to deal with ROS produced under iron deficiency because ascorbate peroxidase and superoxide dismutase are not activated because of the lack of iron as a cofactor, and of heme as a constituent of those enzymes. Superoxide dismutase and peroxidase isoenzymatic regulation may play a determinant role: 10 superoxide dismutase isoenzymes were observed in both cultivars, but iron superoxide dismutase activity was only detected in efficient plants; 15 peroxidase isoenzymes were observed in the roots and trifoliate leaves of efficient and inefficient cultivars and peroxidase activity levels were only increased in roots of efficient plants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue ROS Responses in Plants)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Reactive Oxygen Species Alleviate Cell Death Induced by Thaxtomin A in Arabidopsis thaliana Cell Cultures
Plants 2019, 8(9), 332; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants8090332 - 06 Sep 2019
Abstract
Thaxtomin A (TA) is a cellulose biosynthesis inhibitor synthesized by the soil actinobacterium Streptomyces scabies, which is the main causal agent of potato common scab. TA is essential for the induction of scab lesions on potato tubers. When added to Arabidopsis thaliana [...] Read more.
Thaxtomin A (TA) is a cellulose biosynthesis inhibitor synthesized by the soil actinobacterium Streptomyces scabies, which is the main causal agent of potato common scab. TA is essential for the induction of scab lesions on potato tubers. When added to Arabidopsis thaliana cell cultures, TA induces an atypical programmed cell death (PCD). Although production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) often correlates with the induction of PCD, we observed a decrease in ROS levels following TA treatment. We show that this decrease in ROS accumulation in TA-treated cells is not due to the activation of antioxidant enzymes. Moreover, Arabidopsis cell cultures treated with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) prior to TA treatment had significantly fewer dead cells than cultures treated with TA alone. This suggests that H2O2 induces biochemical or molecular changes in cell cultures that alleviate the activation of PCD by TA. Investigation of the cell wall mechanics using atomic force microscopy showed that H2O2 treatment can prevent the decrease in cell wall rigidity observed after TA exposure. While we cannot exclude the possibility that H2O2 may promote cell survival by altering the cellular redox environment or signaling pathways, our results suggest that H2O2 may inhibit cell death, at least partially, by reinforcing the cell wall to prevent or compensate for damages induced by TA. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue ROS Responses in Plants)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Hydrogen Peroxide and Superoxide Anion Radical Photoproduction in PSII Preparations at Various Modifications of the Water-Oxidizing Complex
Plants 2019, 8(9), 329; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants8090329 - 05 Sep 2019
Abstract
The photoproduction of superoxide anion radical (O2−•) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in photosystem II (PSII) preparations depending on the damage to the water-oxidizing complex (WOC) was investigated. The light-induced formation of O2−• and H [...] Read more.
The photoproduction of superoxide anion radical (O2−•) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in photosystem II (PSII) preparations depending on the damage to the water-oxidizing complex (WOC) was investigated. The light-induced formation of O2−• and H2O2 in the PSII preparations rose with the increased destruction of the WOC. The photoproduction of superoxide both in the PSII preparations holding intact WOC and the samples with damage to the WOC was approximately two times higher than H2O2. The rise of O2−• and H2O2 photoproduction in the PSII preparations in the course of the disassembly of the WOC correlated with the increase in the fraction of the low-potential (LP) Cyt b559. The restoration of electron flow in the Mn-depleted PSII preparations by exogenous electron donors (diphenylcarbazide, Mn2+) suppressed the light-induced formation of O2−• and H2O2. The decrease of O2−• and H2O2 photoproduction upon the restoration of electron transport in the Mn-depleted PSII preparations could be due to the re-conversion of the LP Cyt b559 into higher potential forms. It is supposed that the conversion of the high potential Cyt b559 into its LP form upon damage to the WOC leads to the increase of photoproduction of O2−• and H2O2 in PSII. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue ROS Responses in Plants)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Oxidation of P700 Induces Alternative Electron Flow in Photosystem I in Wheat Leaves
Plants 2019, 8(6), 152; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants8060152 - 05 Jun 2019
Abstract
Oxygen (O2)-evolving photosynthetic organisms oxidize the reaction center chlorophyll, P700, in photosystem I (PSI) to suppress the production of reactive oxygen species. The oxidation of P700 is accompanied by alternative electron flow in PSI (AEF-I), which is not required for photosynthetic [...] Read more.
Oxygen (O2)-evolving photosynthetic organisms oxidize the reaction center chlorophyll, P700, in photosystem I (PSI) to suppress the production of reactive oxygen species. The oxidation of P700 is accompanied by alternative electron flow in PSI (AEF-I), which is not required for photosynthetic linear electron flow (LEF). To characterize AEF-I, we compared the redox reactions of P700 and ferredoxin (Fd) during the induction of carbon dioxide (CO2) assimilation in wheat leaves, using dark-interval relaxation kinetics analysis. Switching on an actinic light (1000 μmol photons m−2 s−1) at ambient CO2 partial pressure of 40 Pa and ambient O2 partial pressure of 21 kPa gradually oxidized P700 (P700+) and enhanced the reduction rate of P700+ (vP700) and oxidation rate of reduced Fd (vFd). The vFd showed a positive linear relationship with an apparent photosynthetic quantum yield of PSII (Y[II]) originating at point zero; the redox turnover of Fd is regulated by LEF via CO2 assimilation and photorespiration. The vP700 also showed a positive linear relationship with Y(II), but the intercept was positive, not zero. That is, the electron flux in PSI included the electron flux in AEF-I in addition to that in LEF. This indicates that the oxidation of P700 induces AEF-I. We propose a possible mechanism underlying AEF-I and its physiological role in the mitigation of oxidative damage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue ROS Responses in Plants)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview
Biotechnological Potential of LSD1, EDS1, and PAD4 in the Improvement of Crops and Industrial Plants
Plants 2019, 8(8), 290; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants8080290 - 16 Aug 2019
Abstract
Lesion Simulating Disease 1 (LSD1), Enhanced Disease Susceptibility (EDS1) and Phytoalexin Deficient 4 (PAD4) were discovered a quarter century ago as regulators of programmed cell death and biotic stress responses in Arabidopsis thaliana. Recent studies have demonstrated that these proteins are also [...] Read more.
Lesion Simulating Disease 1 (LSD1), Enhanced Disease Susceptibility (EDS1) and Phytoalexin Deficient 4 (PAD4) were discovered a quarter century ago as regulators of programmed cell death and biotic stress responses in Arabidopsis thaliana. Recent studies have demonstrated that these proteins are also required for acclimation responses to various abiotic stresses, such as high light, UV radiation, drought and cold, and that their function is mediated through secondary messengers, such as salicylic acid (SA), reactive oxygen species (ROS), ethylene (ET) and other signaling molecules. Furthermore, LSD1, EDS1 and PAD4 were recently shown to be involved in the modification of cell walls, and the regulation of seed yield, biomass production and water use efficiency. The function of these proteins was not only demonstrated in model plants, such as Arabidopsis thaliana or Nicotiana benthamiana, but also in the woody plant Populus tremula x tremuloides. In addition, orthologs of LSD1, EDS1, and PAD4 were found in other plant species, including different crop species. In this review, we focus on specific LSD1, EDS1 and PAD4 features that make them potentially important for agricultural and industrial use. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue ROS Responses in Plants)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Oxygen and ROS in Photosynthesis

Authors: Sergey Khorobrykh, Heta Mattila, Vesa Havurinne and Esa Tyystjärvi

Affiliation: Department of Biochemistry / Molecular Plant Biology, University of Turku, FI-20014 Turku, Finland

Abstract: Oxygen is a natural acceptor of electrons in the respiratory pathway of aerobic organisms and in many other biochemical reactions. Aerobic metabolism is always associated with the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS may damage biomolecules but are also involved in regulatory functions of photosynthetic organisms. The review presents the main properties of ROS, the formation of ROS in the photosynthetic electron transport chain and in the stroma of chloroplasts, and ROS scavenging systems of thylakoid membrane and stroma. Effects of ROS on the photosynthetic apparatus and their roles in redox signaling are discussed.

Key words: reactive oxygen species; chloroplasts; photosynthetic electron transport chain; photodamage; redox signaling

Back to TopTop