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Article

Stress Responses of Shade-Treated Tea Leaves to High Light Exposure after Removal of Shading

1
Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Kyoto Prefectural University, Kyoto 606-8522, Japan
2
Agriculture and Forestry Technology Department, Kyoto Prefectural Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries Technology Center, Kameoka, Kyoto 621-0806, Japan
3
Biotechnology Research Department, Kyoto Prefectural Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries Technology Center, Seika, Kyoto 619-0244, Japan
4
Faculty of Agriculture, Ryukoku University, Seta, Otsu 520-2194, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Plants 2020, 9(3), 302; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9030302
Received: 13 January 2020 / Revised: 22 February 2020 / Accepted: 24 February 2020 / Published: 1 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue ROS Responses in Plants)
High-quality green tea is produced from buds and young leaves grown by the covering-culture method, which employs shading treatment for tea plants (Camellia sinensis L.). Shading treatment improves the quality of tea, but shaded tea plants undergo sudden exposures to high light (HL) at the end of the treatment by shade removal. In this study, the stress response of shaded tea plants to HL illumination was examined in field condition. Chl a/b ratio was lower in shaded plants than nonshaded control, but it increased due to exposure to HL after 14 days. Rapid decline in Fv/Fm values and increases in carbonylated protein level were induced by HL illumination in the shaded leaves on the first day, and they recovered thereafter between a period of one and two weeks. These results revealed that shaded tea plants temporarily suffered from oxidative damages caused by HL exposure, but they could also recover from these damages in 2 weeks. The activities of antioxidant enzymes, total ascorbate level, and ascorbate/dehydroascorbate ratio were decreased and increased in response to low light and HL conditions, respectively, suggesting that the upregulation of antioxidant defense systems plays a role in the protection of the shaded tea plants from HL stress. View Full-Text
Keywords: Camellia sinensis; covering culture; high light; oxidative stress; shading treatment; tea Camellia sinensis; covering culture; high light; oxidative stress; shading treatment; tea
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MDPI and ACS Style

Sano, S.; Takemoto, T.; Ogihara, A.; Suzuki, K.; Masumura, T.; Satoh, S.; Takano, K.; Mimura, Y.; Morita, S. Stress Responses of Shade-Treated Tea Leaves to High Light Exposure after Removal of Shading. Plants 2020, 9, 302. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9030302

AMA Style

Sano S, Takemoto T, Ogihara A, Suzuki K, Masumura T, Satoh S, Takano K, Mimura Y, Morita S. Stress Responses of Shade-Treated Tea Leaves to High Light Exposure after Removal of Shading. Plants. 2020; 9(3):302. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9030302

Chicago/Turabian Style

Sano, Satoshi, Tetsuyuki Takemoto, Akira Ogihara, Kengo Suzuki, Takehiro Masumura, Shigeru Satoh, Kazufumi Takano, Yutaka Mimura, and Shigeto Morita. 2020. "Stress Responses of Shade-Treated Tea Leaves to High Light Exposure after Removal of Shading" Plants 9, no. 3: 302. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9030302

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