Special Issue "Plant Mutation Breeding"

A special issue of Plants (ISSN 2223-7747). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Botany".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Si-Yong Kang
Website
Guest Editor
Radiation Breeding Research Team, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 29 Kuemgu-gil, Jeongeup, Jeonbuk 56212, Republic of Korea
Interests: mutation breeding and genetics; genomics; biotechnology; radiobiology. Currently, I am working on the development of genetic resources by mutation breeding, including various cereals and ornamental and other useful plants, as well as new mutation technology using radiation. I am also working on genomics, phenomics, and metabolomics research using selected mutants
Dr. Sobhana Sivasankar
Website
Guest Editor
Plant Breeding and Genetics, Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Applications in Food and Agriculture, IAEA, Vienna International Centre, 1400 Vienna, Austria
Interests: plant breeding and genetics; mutation breeding; genomics; transcriptomics; high-throughput phenotyping; whole-plant physiology; metabolic pathways; seed/biotechnology industry; international agricultural R&D
Prof. Dr. Qing-Yao Shu
Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Institute of Crop Science, Zhejiang University, 310058, Hangzhou, China
Interests: rice mutation breeding; mutation genetics; mutation genomics; rice biotechnology. I have been in charge of research projects involving genomic studies on induced mutant plants, mutant gene cloning using MutMap and other next-generation genome sequencing techniques, and rice breeding using advanced technologies (doubled haploid, genome editing, etc.)

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Mutation breeding by artificial genetic mutagenesis is an important method for improving crops and creating new genetic resources. The main advantage of mutation breeding by radiation and chemical agents is the creation of one or more favorable mutations randomly for an outstanding variety without altering the remaining genotype. Mutation techniques can also be applied to any crops (annual and perennial crops, seed- and vegetative-propagated crops, and impossible crops of crossing and transgenic origins) and to any initial materials from plants (seeds, pollen grains, cuttings, tubers, bulbs, or tissue cultured materials, as well as the whole individual plant). In addition to generating new varieties for improving crops, induced mutations have contributed to the discovery and identification of gene functions in the next genomics era. Finally, mutation varieties have proven to be environmentally acceptable, unregulated, and non-hazardous, because there is no difference between artificially induced mutants and naturally spontaneous mutants. Based on these advantages, mutation breeding has made a significant contribution to the yield, quality, disease and pest resistance, etc. in crop breeding programs. This Special Issue intends to report recent advances in plant mutation breeding, including new mutation technology and developments of new genetic resources combined with biotechnologies and advanced omics (genomics, proteomics, transcriptomics, phenomics, metabolomics, etc.) research using induced mutants. This Special Issue welcomes the submission of review and research papers or short communications on topics related to plant mutation breeding and its related fusion technologies.

Dr. Si-Yong Kang
Dr. Sobhana Sivasankar
Prof. Dr. Qing-Yao Shu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Plants is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Mutation breeding
  • Mutants
  • Mutagen
  • Plant genetic diversity
  • Molecular markers
  • Omics technologies
  • Abiotic and biotic stress
  • Random and targeted mutation
  • Doubled haploid and polyploidization

Published Papers (12 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
The Effect of Single and Combined Use of Gamma Radiation and Ethylmethane Sulfonate on Early Growth Parameters in Sorghum
Plants 2020, 9(7), 827; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9070827 - 30 Jun 2020
Abstract
Success in inducing genetic variation through mutagenic agents is dependent on the source and dose of application. The objective of this study was to determine the optimum doses of a single and combined use of gamma radiation and ethylmethane sulfonate (EMS) for effective [...] Read more.
Success in inducing genetic variation through mutagenic agents is dependent on the source and dose of application. The objective of this study was to determine the optimum doses of a single and combined use of gamma radiation and ethylmethane sulfonate (EMS) for effective mutation breeding in sorghum. The study involved two concurrent experiments as follows: in experiment I, the seeds of four sorghum genotypes (‘Parbhani Moti’, ‘Parbhani Shakti’, ‘ICSV 15013′, and ‘Macia’) were treated using gamma radiation (0, 300, 400, 500 and 600 Gy), EMS (0, 0.5 and 1.0%), and gamma radiation followed by EMS (0 and 300 Gy and 0.1% EMS; 400 Gy and 0.05% EMS). In experiment II, the seeds of two genotypes (‘Macia’ and ‘Red sorghum’) were treated with seven doses of gamma radiation only (0, 100, 200, 300, 400, 500 and 600 Gy). Overall, the combined applied doses of gamma radiation and EMS are not recommended due to poor seedling emergence and seedling survival rate below LD50. The best dosage of gamma radiation for genotypes Red sorghum, Parbhani Moti, Macia, ICSV 15013 and Parbhani Shakti ranged between 392 and 419 Gy, 311 and 354 Gy, 256 and 355 Gy, 273 and 304 Gy, and 266 and 297 Gy, respectively. The EMS optimum dosage ranges for genotypes Parbhani Shakti, ICSV 15013, Parbhani Moti and Macia were between 0.41% and 0.60%, 0.48% and 0.58%, 0.46% and 0.51%, and 0.36% and 0.45%, respectively. The above dose rates are useful to induce genetic variation in the tested sorghum genotypes for greater mutation events in sorghum breeding programs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Mutation Breeding)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Composition and Antioxidant Activities of Volatile Organic Compounds in Radiation-Bred Coreopsis Cultivars
Plants 2020, 9(6), 717; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9060717 - 04 Jun 2020
Abstract
Coreopsis is a flowering plant belonging to the Asteraceae family. It is an ornamental plant native to the Americas, Asia and Oceania and its flower is used as a raw material for tea and food manufacture in China. In this study, new cultivars [...] Read more.
Coreopsis is a flowering plant belonging to the Asteraceae family. It is an ornamental plant native to the Americas, Asia and Oceania and its flower is used as a raw material for tea and food manufacture in China. In this study, new cultivars of C. rosea (“golden ring”) were developed via radiation-induced mutation of the original cultivar, “pumpkin pie”. The chemical composition and antioxidant activities of flowers belonging to three different Coreopsis cultivars were evaluated: “golden ring”, “pumpkin pie” and “snow chrysanthemum” (coreopsis tea; C. tinctoria). The volatile compounds were characterized via gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and 50–59 oils representing 95.3–96.8% of the total volatile compounds in these flower materials were identified. ”Golden ring” contained a high amount of fatty acids (38.13%), while “pumpkin pie” and “snow chrysanthemum” teas were rich in aliphatic amides (43.01%) and esters (67.22%), respectively. The antioxidant activities of the volatile oils of these cultivars were evaluated using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydraxyl (DPPH) and 2,2-azino-bis-3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS) radical scavenging assays. The volatile extract of “golden ring” showed higher antioxidant activities compared with the extracts of the other cultivars. Therefore, “golden ring” can be used for further development as a raw material for tea manufacture or as a dietary supplement. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Mutation Breeding)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
High-Resolution Mapping of the Novel Early Leaf Senescence Gene Els2 in Common Wheat
Plants 2020, 9(6), 698; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9060698 - 30 May 2020
Abstract
Early leaf senescence negatively impacts the grain yield in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Induced mutants provide an important resource for mapping and cloning of genes for early leaf senescence. In our previous study, Els2, a single incomplete dominance gene, that caused [...] Read more.
Early leaf senescence negatively impacts the grain yield in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Induced mutants provide an important resource for mapping and cloning of genes for early leaf senescence. In our previous study, Els2, a single incomplete dominance gene, that caused early leaf senescence phenotype in the wheat mutant LF2099, had been mapped on the long arm of chromosome 2B. The objective of this study was to develop molecular markers tightly linked to the Els2 gene and construct a high-resolution map surrounding the Els2 gene. Three tightly linked single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers were obtained from the Illumina Wheat 90K iSelect SNP genotyping array and converted to Kompetitive allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (KASP) markers. To saturate the Els2 region, the Axiom® Wheat 660K SNP array was used to screen bulked extreme phenotype DNA pools, and 9 KASP markers were developed. For fine mapping of the Els2 gene, these KASP markers and previously identified polymorphic markers were analyzed in a large F2 population of the LF2099 × Chinese Spring cross. The Els2 gene was located in a 0.24-cM genetic region flanked by the KASP markers AX-111643885 and AX-111128667, which corresponded to a physical interval of 1.61 Mb in the Chinese Spring chromosome 2BL containing 27 predicted genes with high confidence. The study laid a foundation for a map-based clone of the Els2 gene controlling the mutation phenotype and revealing the molecular regulatory mechanism of wheat leaf senescence. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Mutation Breeding)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Characterization of Gene Isoforms Related to Cellulose and Lignin Biosynthesis in Kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.) Mutant
Plants 2020, 9(5), 631; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9050631 - 14 May 2020
Abstract
Kenaf is a source of fiber and a bioenergy crop that is considered to be a third world crop. Recently, a new kenaf cultivar, "Jangdae," was developed by gamma irradiation. It exhibited distinguishable characteristics such as higher biomass, higher seed yield, and earlier [...] Read more.
Kenaf is a source of fiber and a bioenergy crop that is considered to be a third world crop. Recently, a new kenaf cultivar, "Jangdae," was developed by gamma irradiation. It exhibited distinguishable characteristics such as higher biomass, higher seed yield, and earlier flowering than the wild type. We sequenced and analyzed the transcriptome of apical leaf and stem using Pacific Biosciences single-molecule long-read isoform sequencing platform. De novo assembly yielded 26,822 full-length transcripts with a total length of 59 Mbp. Sequence similarity against protein sequence allowed the functional annotation of 11,370 unigenes. Among them, 10,100 unigenes were assigned gene ontology terms, the majority of which were associated with the metabolic and cellular process. The Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes (KEGG) analysis mapped 8875 of the annotated unigenes to 149 metabolic pathways. We also identified the majority of putative genes involved in cellulose and lignin-biosynthesis. We further evaluated the expression pattern in eight gene families involved in lignin-biosynthesis at different growth stages. In this study, appropriate biotechnological approaches using the information obtained for these putative genes will help to modify the desirable content traits in mutants. The transcriptome data can be used as a reference dataset and provide a resource for molecular genetic studies in kenaf. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Mutation Breeding)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
High-Throughput Phenotyping (HTP) Data Reveal Dosage Effect at Growth Stages in Arabidopsis thaliana Irradiated by Gamma Rays
Plants 2020, 9(5), 557; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9050557 - 27 Apr 2020
Abstract
The effects of radiation dosages on plant species are quantitatively presented as the lethal dose or the dose required for growth reduction in mutation breeding. However, lethal dose and growth reduction fail to provide dynamic growth behavior information such as growth rate after [...] Read more.
The effects of radiation dosages on plant species are quantitatively presented as the lethal dose or the dose required for growth reduction in mutation breeding. However, lethal dose and growth reduction fail to provide dynamic growth behavior information such as growth rate after irradiation. Irradiated seeds of Arabidopsis were grown in an environmentally controlled high-throughput phenotyping (HTP) platform to capture growth images that were analyzed with machine learning algorithms. Analysis of digital phenotyping data revealed unique growth patterns following treatments below LD50 value at 641 Gy. Plants treated with 100-Gy gamma irradiation showed almost identical growth pattern compared with wild type; the hormesis effect was observed >21 days after sowing. In 200 Gy-treated plants, a uniform growth pattern but smaller rosette areas than the wild type were seen (p < 0.05). The shift between vegetative and reproductive stages was not retarded by irradiation at 200 and 300 Gy although growth inhibition was detected under the same irradiation dose. Results were validated using 200 and 300 Gy doses with HTP in a separate study. To our knowledge, this is the first study to apply a HTP platform to measure and analyze the dosage effect of radiation in plants. The method enabled an in-depth analysis of growth patterns, which could not be detected previously due to a lack of time-series data. This information will improve our knowledge about the effects of radiation in model plant species and crops. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Mutation Breeding)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Mutagenic Effect of Three Ion Beams on Rice and Identification of Heritable Mutations by Whole Genome Sequencing
Plants 2020, 9(5), 551; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9050551 - 26 Apr 2020
Abstract
High-energy ion beams are known to be an effective and unique type of physical mutagen in plants. However, no study on the mutagenic effect of argon (Ar) ion beam radiation on rice has been reported. Genome-wide studies on induced mutations are important to [...] Read more.
High-energy ion beams are known to be an effective and unique type of physical mutagen in plants. However, no study on the mutagenic effect of argon (Ar) ion beam radiation on rice has been reported. Genome-wide studies on induced mutations are important to comprehend their characteristics for establishing knowledge-based protocols for mutation induction and breeding, which are still very limited in rice. The present study aimed to investigate the mutagenic effect of three ion beams, i.e., Ar, carbon (C) and neon (Ne) on rice and identify and characterize heritable induced mutations by the whole genome sequencing of six M4 plants. Dose-dependent damage effects were observed on M1 plants, which were developed from ion beam irradiated dry seeds of two indica (LH15, T23) and two japonica (DS551, DS48) rice lines. High frequencies of chlorophyll-deficient seedlings and male-sterile plants were observed in all M2 populations (up to ~30% on M1 plant basis); plants from the seeds of different panicles of a common M1 plant appeared to have different mutations; the whole genome-sequencing demonstrated that there were 236–453 mutations in each of the six M4 plants, including single base substitutions (SBSs) and small insertion/deletions (InDels), with the number of SBSs ~ 4–8 times greater than that of InDels; SBS and InDel mutations were distributed across different genomic regions of all 12 chromosomes, however, only a small number of mutations (0–6) were present in exonic regions that might have an impact on gene function. In summary, the present study demonstrates that Ar, C and Ne ion beam radiation are all effective for mutation induction in rice and has revealed at the genome level the characteristics of the mutations induced by the three ion beams. The findings are of importance to the efficient use of ion beam radiation for the generation and utilization of mutants in rice. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Mutation Breeding)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Frequency, Spectrum, and Stability of Leaf Mutants Induced by Diverse γ-Ray Treatments in Two Cymbidium Hybrids
Plants 2020, 9(4), 546; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9040546 - 23 Apr 2020
Abstract
Ionizing radiation combined with in vitro tissue culture has been used for development of new cultivars in diverse crops. The effects of ionizing radiation on mutation induction have been analyzed on several orchid species, including Cymbidium. Limited information is available on the [...] Read more.
Ionizing radiation combined with in vitro tissue culture has been used for development of new cultivars in diverse crops. The effects of ionizing radiation on mutation induction have been analyzed on several orchid species, including Cymbidium. Limited information is available on the comparison of mutation frequency and spectrum based on phenotypes in Cymbidium species. In addition, the stability of induced chimera mutants in Cymbidium is unknown. In this study, we analyzed the radiation sensitivity, mutation frequency, and spectrum of mutants induced by diverse γ-ray treatments, and analyzed the stability of induced chimera mutants in the Cymbidium hybrid cultivars RB003 and RB012. The optimal γ-irradiation conditions of each cultivar differed as follows: RB003, mutation frequency of 4.06% (under 35 Gy/4 h); RB012, 1.51% (20 Gy/1 h). Re-irradiation of γ-rays broadened the mutation spectrum observed in RB012. The stability of leaf-color chimera mutants was higher than that of leaf-shape chimeras, and stability was dependent on the chimera type and location of a mutation in the cell layers of the shoot apical meristem. These results indicated that short-term γ-irradiation was more effective to induce mutations in Cymbidium. Information on the stability of chimera mutants will be useful for mutation breeding of diverse ornamental plants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Mutation Breeding)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessCommunication
Dark/Light Treatments Followed by γ-Irradiation Increase the Frequency of Leaf-Color Mutants in Cymbidium
Plants 2020, 9(4), 532; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9040532 - 20 Apr 2020
Abstract
Radiation randomly induces chromosomal mutations in plants. However, it was recently found that the frequency of flower-color mutants could be specifically increased by upregulating anthocyanin pathway gene expression before radiation treatments. The mechanisms of chlorophyll biosynthesis and degradation are active areas of plant [...] Read more.
Radiation randomly induces chromosomal mutations in plants. However, it was recently found that the frequency of flower-color mutants could be specifically increased by upregulating anthocyanin pathway gene expression before radiation treatments. The mechanisms of chlorophyll biosynthesis and degradation are active areas of plant study because chlorophyll metabolism is closely connected to photosynthesis. In this study, we determined the dark/light treatment conditions that resulted in upregulation of the expression levels of six chlorophyll pathway genes, uroporphyrinogen III synthase (HEMD), uroporphyrinogen III decarboxylase (HEME2), NADPH-protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase (POR) A (PORA), chlorophyll synthase (CHLG), chlorophyllase (CLH2), and red chlorophyll catabolite reductase (RCCR), and measured their effects on the γ-irradiation-induced frequencies of leaf-color mutants in two Cymbidium cultivars. To degrade chlorophyll in rhizomes, 60–75 days of dark treatment were required. To upregulate the expressions of chlorophyll pathway genes, 10 days of light treatment appeared to be optimal. Dark/light treatments followed by γ-irradiation increased chlorophyll-related leaf mutants by 1.4- to 2.0-fold compared with γ-ray treatment alone. Dark/light treatments combined with γ-irradiation increased the frequency of leaf-color mutants in Cymbidium, which supports the wider implementation of a plant breeding methodology that increases the mutation frequency of a target trait by controlling the expression of target trait-related genes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Mutation Breeding)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Colchicine-Induced Polyploidy in Rhododendron fortunei Lindl
Plants 2020, 9(4), 424; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9040424 - 31 Mar 2020
Abstract
Polyploidy in Rhododendron fortunei has great potential to improve its horticultural and commercial value, and to also meet market demands. In this study, a feasible method for polyploid induction in R. fortunei via colchicine treatment was established, and the obtained polyploid plants were [...] Read more.
Polyploidy in Rhododendron fortunei has great potential to improve its horticultural and commercial value, and to also meet market demands. In this study, a feasible method for polyploid induction in R. fortunei via colchicine treatment was established, and the obtained polyploid plants were identified and characterized. As a result, the stem bases of tissue-cultured plantlets treated with 0.1% colchicine for 24 h showed the highest polyploid induction with a rate of 36.67%. By flow cytometric analysis, 69 tetraploids and 29 octoploids were identified in the regenerated plants that were examined. Phenotypic analysis indicated that the leaves of tetraploid and octoploid plants were smaller, rounder and thicker with more abundant and longer epidermal hairs than those of diploids. Furthermore, the stomata of polyploids were larger and sparser than those of diploids. An increase in chlorophyll content was also detected in polyploids, which resulted in darker green leaves. In conclusion, our study established an effective method to induce polyploidy in R. fortunei, which could be used to develop new genetic resources for breeding R. fortunei and other Rhododendron species in the future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Mutation Breeding)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Development and Characterization of an Ethyl Methane Sulfonate (EMS) Induced Mutant Population in Capsicum annuum L.
Plants 2020, 9(3), 396; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9030396 - 23 Mar 2020
Abstract
Plant breeding explores genetic diversity in useful traits to develop new, high-yielding, and improved cultivars. Ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS) is a chemical widely used to induce mutations at loci that regulate economically essential traits. Additionally, it can knock out genes, facilitating efforts to [...] Read more.
Plant breeding explores genetic diversity in useful traits to develop new, high-yielding, and improved cultivars. Ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS) is a chemical widely used to induce mutations at loci that regulate economically essential traits. Additionally, it can knock out genes, facilitating efforts to elucidate gene functions through the analysis of mutant phenotypes. Here, we developed a mutant population using the small and pungent ornamental Capsicum annuum pepper “Micro-Pep”. This accession is particularly suitable for mutation studies and molecular research due to its compact growth habit and small size. We treated 9500 seeds with 1.3% EMS and harvested 3996 M2 lines. We then selected 1300 (32.5%) independent M2 families and evaluated their phenotypes over four years. The mutants displayed phenotypic variations in plant growth, habit, leaf color and shape, and flower and fruit morphology. An experiment to optimize Targeting Induced Local Lesions IN Genomes (TILLING) in pepper detected nine EMS-induced mutations in the eIF4E gene. The M2 families developed here exhibited broad phenotypic variation and should be valuable genetic resources for functional gene analysis in pepper molecular breeding programs using reverse genetics tools, including TILLING. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Mutation Breeding)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Mutations of OsPLDa1 Increase Lysophospholipid Content and Enhance Cooking and Eating Quality in Rice
Plants 2020, 9(3), 390; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9030390 - 21 Mar 2020
Abstract
Phospholipids belong to a significant class of lipids and comprise ~10% of total lipids in rice grains. Lysophospholipid (LPL) is derived from the hydrolysis of phospholipids and plays an important role in rice grain quality. Our previous study demonstrated that mutations in a [...] Read more.
Phospholipids belong to a significant class of lipids and comprise ~10% of total lipids in rice grains. Lysophospholipid (LPL) is derived from the hydrolysis of phospholipids and plays an important role in rice grain quality. Our previous study demonstrated that mutations in a phospholipase D gene (OsPLDα1) significantly altered lipid metabolites and reduced phytic acid content. In the present study, the effect of two ospldα1 mutations on LPL and other physicochemical prosperities of brown rice was further investigated, with the aim of assessing the overall importance of ospldα1 mutations in rice grain quality. Metabolite profiling revealed a ~15% increase in LPL level in both ospldα1 mutants as compared with their wild-type (WT) parent. Both ospldα1 mutations significantly lowered the apparent amylose content in brown rice flour (~1.9%) and altered viscosity profiles with significantly increased breakdown (+12.4%) and significantly reduced setback viscosity (−6.2%). Moreover, both ospldα1 mutations significantly lowered the gelatinization onset, peak temperature and retrogradation percentage of brown rice flour. This study demonstrated that OsPLDα1 plays a crucial role in rice grain quality and its mutation could, in general, improve the cooking and eating quality and nourishment of brown rice. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Mutation Breeding)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Molecular Characterization and Identification of Calnexin 1 As a Radiation Biomarker from Tradescantia BNL4430
Plants 2020, 9(3), 387; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9030387 - 20 Mar 2020
Abstract
Calnexin (CNX) is an integral membrane protein that functions as a chaperone in the endoplasmic reticulum for the correct folding of proteins under stress conditions, rendering organisms tolerant under adverse conditions. Studies have investigated the cytogenetic effects of gamma irradiation (Ɣ-IR) on plants, [...] Read more.
Calnexin (CNX) is an integral membrane protein that functions as a chaperone in the endoplasmic reticulum for the correct folding of proteins under stress conditions, rendering organisms tolerant under adverse conditions. Studies have investigated the cytogenetic effects of gamma irradiation (Ɣ-IR) on plants, but information on the molecular response under Ɣ-IR remains limited. Previously, we constructed a cDNA library of an irradiation-sensitive bioindicator plant, Tradescantia BNL4430 (T-4430) under Ɣ-IR, in which the Calnexin-1 gene was highly upregulated at 50 mGy treatment. TrCNX1 encodes a 61.4 kDa protein with conserved signature motifs similar to already reported CNX1s. TrCNX1 expression was evaluated by semiquantitative reverse transcriptase PCR and quantitative real-time PCR and was ubiquitously expressed in various tissues and highly upregulated in flower petals under 50 mGy Ɣ-IR stress. The protective function of TrCNX1 was investigated by overexpression of TrCNX1 in an Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) heterologous system. Using plate assay, we showed that TrCNX1 increased the viability of E. coli transformants under both UV-B and Ɣ-IR compared with the control, demonstrating that TrCNX1 functions under irradiation stress. TrCNX1 may enhance irradiation stress tolerance in crops and act as a radio marker gene to monitor the effects of radiation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Mutation Breeding)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop