Special Issue "Long-Distance Signals and Systemic Adaptation Response on Action of Stressors in Plants"

A special issue of Plants (ISSN 2223-7747). This special issue belongs to the section "Plant Response to Abiotic Stress and Climate Change".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 28 February 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Vladimir Sukhov
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biophysics, Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod, Nizhny Novgorod, 603950, Russian Federation
Interests: electrical signals; plant adaptation; photosynthesis; remote sensing; simulation
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Special Issue Information

Dear colleague,

Action of many stressors on a plant organism (excessive light, high and low temperatures, drought, mechanical wounding, insect attacks, etc.) can be spatially heterogeneous. In contrast, adaptation to these stressors requires fast coordinated changes in physiological processes, i.e. induction of a systemic adaptation response. Long-distance signals (including electrical, hydraulic, chemical, ROS and other signals), which quickly propagate from irritated zone to other parts of the plant body, can be important linkers between the local action of stressors and induction of the systemic response. Long-distance signals can influence expression of genes, production of phytohormones, phloem mass flow, photosynthesis, respiration, transpiration and many other processes. Numerous problems in this field are actively investigated now; in particular, dependence of type and parameters of long-distance signals on types of stressors, mechanisms of their propagation, ways of influence of long-distance signals on specific physiological processes, participation of changes in these processes in the plant adaptation, interactions between long-distance signals of different types (e.g. electrical and ROS signals, hormonal and hydraulic signals, etc), role of long-distance signals in information processing in plants, simulation of plant long-distance signals, using of long-distance signals and physiological responses caused by them in monitoring of plants, etc. This Special Issue of Plants will highlight the all aspects of participation of long-distance signals in the systemic adaptation response on action of stressors in plants. Reviews and research articles focused on a complex analysis of physiological roles of long-distance signals in plants will be especially appropriated for the Special Issue

Dr. Vladimir Sukhov
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Plants is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Long-distance signals
  • electrical signals
  • chemical signals
  • ROS signals
  • physiological role
  • systemic adaptation response
  • spatially heterogeneous action of stressors

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Spatial and Temporal Dynamics of Electrical and Photosynthetic Activity and the Content of Phytohormones Induced by Local Stimulation of Pea Plants
Plants 2020, 9(10), 1364; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9101364 - 15 Oct 2020
Abstract
A local leaf burning causes variation potential (VP) propagation, a decrease in photosynthesis activity, and changes in the content of phytohormones in unstimulated leaves in pea plants. The VP-induced photosynthesis response develops in two phases: fast inactivation and long-term inactivation. Along with a [...] Read more.
A local leaf burning causes variation potential (VP) propagation, a decrease in photosynthesis activity, and changes in the content of phytohormones in unstimulated leaves in pea plants. The VP-induced photosynthesis response develops in two phases: fast inactivation and long-term inactivation. Along with a decrease in photosynthetic activity, there is a transpiration suppression in unstimulated pea leaves, which corresponds to the long-term phase of photosynthesis response. Phytohormone level analysis showed an increase in the concentration of jasmonic acid (JA) preceding a transpiration suppression and a long-term phase of the photosynthesis response. Analysis of the spatial and temporal dynamics of electrical signals, phytohormone levels, photosynthesis, and transpiration activity showed the most pronounced changes in the more distant leaf from the area of local stimulation. The established features are related to the architecture of the vascular bundles in the pea stem. Full article
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Inactivation of H+-ATPase can be link between variation potential and changes in photosynthesis and respiration in peas
Authors: Vladimir Sukhov
Affiliation: Department of Biophysics, Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod, Nizhny Novgorod, 603950, Russian Federation
Abstract: Local damages (e.g. burning, heating or crush) cause generation and propagation of unique electrical signal (variation potential, VP) in higher plants. In particular, VP induces activation of respiration, inactivation of photosynthetic processes and increase of their thermal resistance in intact plant cells. VP generation is based on transient inactivation of H+-ATPase in plasma membrane; in current work we investigated participation of this inactivation in development of VP-induced physiological responses in peas. Firstly, it was shown that pretreatment by vanadate (inhibitor of H+-ATPase) and fusicoccin (activator of H+-ATPase) reduced and activated, respectively, the VP-induced changes in photosynthetic and respiratory activities in plants. Secondly, treatment by vanadate induced inactivation of photosynthesis and activation of respiration in pea’s protoplasts. Thirdly, VP increased thermal resistance of photosystem I, and the effect was fully suppressed in vanadate-treated plants. Our results show that inactivation of H+-ATPase plays an important role in VP-induced changes in photosynthesis and respiration and increase of thermal resistance of photosystem I.

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