Special Issue "Optomechanics: Science and Applications"

A special issue of Photonics (ISSN 2304-6732). This special issue belongs to the section "Quantum Photonics and Technologies".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Tongcang Li
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Physics and Astronomy and School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, 525 Northwestern Ave, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA
Interests: optomechanics; quantum sensing; quantum photonics; optical trapping

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue is devoted to publishing recent advancements in optomechanics, which investigates the interaction between photons and mechanical motions. There have been many remarkable developments in optomechanics recently. Quantum behaviors have been observed in different optomechanical systems, including nanofabricated resonators, optically levitated nanoparticles, and LIGO’s 40-kilogram mirrors. Optomechanical systems have also found essential applications in acceleration and rotation sensing, precision measurements, quantum state transduction, and beyond.

This Special Issue brings worldwide experts together to discuss the latest research in all fields of optomechanics. Topics include but are not limited to the following:

  • Cavity optomechanics;
  • Levitated optomechanics;
  • Superfluid optomechanics;
  • Optomechanical crystals;
  • Optomechanics with 1D and 2D materials;
  • Optomechanical transduction;
  • Optomechanical sensing;
  • Spin optomechanics;
  • Hybrid optomechanical devices.

Prof. Dr. Tongcang Li
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Photonics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

Article
Cooperative Molecular Rabi Splitting for Strong Coupling between a Plain Au Layer and an Azo-Dye
Photonics 2021, 8(12), 531; https://doi.org/10.3390/photonics8120531 (registering DOI) - 25 Nov 2021
Viewed by 182
Abstract
Here, the experimental and numerical results provide evidence of strong coupling between an Au layer and an azo-dye. Strong coupling between the Au and a dye is not easy to observe, so a deep analysis for understanding the physics of the system is [...] Read more.
Here, the experimental and numerical results provide evidence of strong coupling between an Au layer and an azo-dye. Strong coupling between the Au and a dye is not easy to observe, so a deep analysis for understanding the physics of the system is carried on. After an accurate analysis of the reflectivity of the plain Au layer as well as after the chromophore adsorption, a hypothesis of strong coupling was advanced. The reflectivity dispersion of system polariton-exciton is characterized by an anti-crossing and two polaritons with a distance that raises with the concentration of the molecules until reaching a condition of saturation, as proof of a non-weak coupling. However, from one side the low-quality factor Q, from the other the optical characteristics of the dye, the strong coupling seems to contradict the achieved results. Then, a possible explanation of these results is that the collective vibrational level structure of the molecules plays a crucial role, and despite the poor conditions of coupling, the matching between the phonons and the excitons reaches an outstanding strength. The emission spectra permitted to characterize the vibrational status of the molecules coupled to the polaritons. Due to the dye adsorption, the surface plasmon frequency shifts, and the Stokes peak splits into two peaks, having a distance bigger than their line width. The strong effect of the collective mechanism of the molecules was described by a hybrid model. Finally, after proving and characterizing the strong coupling, the Raman scattering from such hybridized light-matter states was studied. The coherent nature of the vibro-polariton states increases the Raman scattering cross-section and indicates an enhancement mechanism due to the intrinsic properties of the molecules (e.g., polarizability). Since the light-matter interaction permits the property modulation of materials by confining to small volumes the light field for forming exciton-polariton states, these results provide insight into molecular science. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optomechanics: Science and Applications)
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Communication
Direct and Clean Loading of Nanoparticles into Optical Traps at Millibar Pressures
Photonics 2021, 8(11), 458; https://doi.org/10.3390/photonics8110458 - 20 Oct 2021
Viewed by 353
Abstract
Nanoparticles levitated by optical fields under vacuum conditions have applications in quantum science, the study of nanothermodynamics and precision sensing. The existing techniques for loading optical traps require ambient conditions and often involve dispersion in liquids, which can contaminate delicate optics and lead [...] Read more.
Nanoparticles levitated by optical fields under vacuum conditions have applications in quantum science, the study of nanothermodynamics and precision sensing. The existing techniques for loading optical traps require ambient conditions and often involve dispersion in liquids, which can contaminate delicate optics and lead to enhanced optical absorption and heating. Here, we present a clean, dry and generic mechanism for directly loading optical traps at pressures down to 1 mbar, exploiting Laser Induced Acoustic Desorption and allowing for the rapid and efficient trapping of nanoparticles. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optomechanics: Science and Applications)
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Article
Optical Amplification and Fast-Slow Light in a Three-Mode Cavity Optomechanical System without Rotating Wave Approximation
Photonics 2021, 8(9), 384; https://doi.org/10.3390/photonics8090384 - 09 Sep 2021
Viewed by 416
Abstract
We investigate the optical amplification of the output field and fast-slow light effect in a three-mode cavity optomechanical system without rotating wave approximation and discuss two ways of realizing the optical amplification effect. Resorting to the Coulomb coupling between the nanomechanical resonators, the [...] Read more.
We investigate the optical amplification of the output field and fast-slow light effect in a three-mode cavity optomechanical system without rotating wave approximation and discuss two ways of realizing the optical amplification effect. Resorting to the Coulomb coupling between the nanomechanical resonators, the asymmetric double optomechanically induced amplification effect can be achieved by utilizing the counterrotating term. Moreover, we find a remarkable optical amplification effect and observe the prominent fast-slow light effect at the singular point since the introduction of mechanical gain. Meanwhile, the transmission rate of the output field is increased by four orders of magnitude and the group delay time can reach in the order of 105μs. Our work is of great significance for the potential applications of optomechanically induced amplification in quantum information processing and quantum precision measurement. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optomechanics: Science and Applications)
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Article
Optical Trapping of Sub−Micrometer Particles with Fiber Tapers Fabricated by Fiber Pulling Assisted Chemical Etching
Photonics 2021, 8(9), 367; https://doi.org/10.3390/photonics8090367 - 31 Aug 2021
Viewed by 486
Abstract
Optical trapping of sub−micrometer particles in three dimensions has been attracting increasing attention in a wide variety of fields such as physics, chemistry, and biologics. Optical fibers that allow stable trapping of such particles are not readily available but beneficial in system integration [...] Read more.
Optical trapping of sub−micrometer particles in three dimensions has been attracting increasing attention in a wide variety of fields such as physics, chemistry, and biologics. Optical fibers that allow stable trapping of such particles are not readily available but beneficial in system integration and miniaturization. Here, we present a readily accessible batch fabrication method, namely fiber pulling assisted tubeless chemical etching, to obtain sharp tapered optical fibers from regular telecommunication single−mode fibers. We demonstrated the applications of such fiber tapers in two non−plasmonic optical trapping systems, namely single− and dual−fiber−taper−based trapping systems. We realized single particle trapping, multiple particle trapping, optical binding, and optical guiding with sub−micrometer silica particles. Particularly, using the dual fiber system, we observed the three−dimensional optical trapping of swarm sub−micrometer particles, which is more challenging to realize than trapping a single particle. Because of the capability of sub−micrometer particle trapping and the accessible batch fabrication method, the fiber taper−based trapping systems are highly potential tools that can find many applications in biology and physics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optomechanics: Science and Applications)
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Article
Characterizing Quantum Effects in Optically Induced Nanowire Self-Oscillations: Coherent Properties
Photonics 2021, 8(7), 237; https://doi.org/10.3390/photonics8070237 - 25 Jun 2021
Viewed by 389
Abstract
Mechanical properties of metallic-nanowire self-oscillations are investigated through a coherent-state analysis. We focus on elucidating the time behavior of quantum energy in such oscillations, in addition to the analysis of fluctuations, evolution of eigenstates, and oscillatory trajectories. The quantum energy varies somewhat randomly [...] Read more.
Mechanical properties of metallic-nanowire self-oscillations are investigated through a coherent-state analysis. We focus on elucidating the time behavior of quantum energy in such oscillations, in addition to the analysis of fluctuations, evolution of eigenstates, and oscillatory trajectories. The quantum energy varies somewhat randomly at first, but, at a later time, it undergoes a stable periodical oscillation; the mean energy in the stabilized motion is large when the frequency of the driving force is resonated with that of the intrinsic oscillation of the nanowire. We confirmed that when the oscillatory amplitude is sufficiently low, the quantum energy is quite different from the classical one due to zero-point energy which appears in the quantum regime. Because the power in such an oscillation is typically ultra low, quantum effects in the nanowire oscillations are non-negligible. Detailed analysis for the evolution of the probability densities and their relation with the oscillation trajectories of the nanowire are also carried out. Characterizing quantum effects in the actual oscillatory motions and clarifying their difference from the classical ones are important in understanding nanowire self-oscillations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optomechanics: Science and Applications)
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Article
Robust Four-Wave Mixing and Double Second-Order Optomechanically Induced Transparency Sideband in a Hybrid Optomechanical System
Photonics 2021, 8(7), 234; https://doi.org/10.3390/photonics8070234 - 24 Jun 2021
Viewed by 411
Abstract
We theoretically research the four-wave mixing (FWM) and second-order sideband generation (SSG) in a hybrid optomechanical system under the condition of pump on-resonance and pump off-resonance, where an optomechanical resonator is coupled to another nanomechanical resonator (NR) via Coulomb interaction. Using the standard [...] Read more.
We theoretically research the four-wave mixing (FWM) and second-order sideband generation (SSG) in a hybrid optomechanical system under the condition of pump on-resonance and pump off-resonance, where an optomechanical resonator is coupled to another nanomechanical resonator (NR) via Coulomb interaction. Using the standard quantum optics method and input–output theory, we obtain the analytical solution of the FWM and SSG with strict derivation. According to the numerical simulations, we find that the FWM can be controlled via regulating the coupling strength and the frequency difference of the two NRs under different detuning, which also gives a means to determine the coupling strength of the two NRs. Furthermore, the SSG is sensitive to the detuning, which shows double second-order optomechanically induced transparency (OMIT) sidebands via controlling the coupling strength and frequencies of the resonators. Our investigation may increase the comprehension of nonlinear phenomena in hybrid optomechanics systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optomechanics: Science and Applications)
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